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Posted Aug 31, 2013
9:12:25 AM
Is early upgrade always the worst choice?
Edited by qili0547 on Aug 31, 2013 at 9:24:19 AM

Notice that you need to pay discount price+ 250 to get early upgrade. But the ETF is $325 minus $10 for each full month  of completed Service Commitment. For example, you have completed 12 month, you need to pay 205 to ETF. And you can start a new contract. It's cheaper than early upgrade. Early upgrade only beats ETF before the 7th month of your contract wchich is not allowed. What's the meaning of early upgrade? I didnt get it. Or do i misusderstand something?

Is early upgrade always the worst choice?

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Aug 31, 2013 9:57:29 AM
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ACE - Professor
Well one thing you are missing about the ETF is that you are charged that plus the monthly recurring charges, which are no longer prorated.

So for example if you were let's say 10 months into your contact, this would be $325- $100 which makes it $225 as the ETF. Now take into account that your normal recurring charges is something like $120 (this is only an example). So to terminate your contract you would be charged $225+ $120 + taxes which would be costlier in the long run and you lose your cell number and can't open a new agreement to get it back (I think the wait is about 6 months?).

The early upgrade option is basically just that, an early upgrade! Smiley Tongue It offers a partial discount (since you are still under contract) of the subsidized pricing + $250 as you correctly said. This would also renew your contract. The benefits of this is it's a tad cheaper (not by much) than the no commitment price and you get to keep your number intact and you get a new device without having to wait 24 months. Smiley Happy

Hope that helps!
~Sunshine :)
- Sunshine :)
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Aug 31, 2013 10:33:33 AM
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Tutor

Thank you. What do you mean by paying normal recurring charges? Is it need to paying the monthly cost for the rest all the monthes left?

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Aug 31, 2013 10:41:25 AM
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ACE - Professor
Edited by 21stNow on Aug 31, 2013 at 10:42:05 AM

Paying the ETF is only an option if you want to stop service with AT&T altogether.  It is not a contract buyout fee that makes you eligible for a new phone at the contract price immediately.  To answer your question, you would not owe the remaining monthly recurring charges if you left AT&T.  You would only owe the ETF and the full charges (in most cases)  for the month in which you left AT&T.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Aug 31, 2013 11:03:15 AM
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Professor

As others have pointed out, paying the ETF terminates service for that line. If you have a single plan, you would face starting a new account with a new credit check. That could be ok or it could be bad, and you just terminated a contract and paid a fee with the carrier. It would also mean getting a new phone number and paying an activation fee.

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Aug 31, 2013 1:51:21 PM
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Expert

sitnsidewayz wrote:

As others have pointed out, paying the ETF terminates service for that line. If you have a single plan, you would face starting a new account with a new credit check. That could be ok or it could be bad, and you just terminated a contract and paid a fee with the carrier. It would also mean getting a new phone number and paying an activation fee.


Also believe there is a either a 90 or 180 day waiting period before you qualify for a new customer again

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Aug 31, 2013 2:47:40 PM
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Tutor

 just add a new line with new contract and then cancel the old line.

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Sep 1, 2013 6:01:18 AM
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Expert

qili0547 wrote:

 just add a new line with new contract and then cancel the old line.


the results of this would be paying the remaining etf and lose the telephone number, when you cancel a line you release the number

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