AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost

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AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost

Dear AT&T.

 

Someone really needs to rethink your hardline stance concerning upgrading clients with high monthly phone rates.  I just got off the phone with AT&T Reps including retention due to my situation.  I currently have an ETF of $215.  I upgraded last year to the iPhone 5 (Early Oct. 2013).  Last year I had to battle with Retention to make the point that your early upgrade cost of $250 did not make sense since I could quite AT&T for less money.  I am again in this situation.  I am attempting to Upgrade my phone to the 5S, give my phone to my life partner and merge him onto my account.  His AT&T account is fully outside of contract since he has always gotten my older phones.  So I called in and this time, like last time, retention agreed that yes my ETF was lower, but they really couldn't do anything other than credit me $25 and then give me the phone at a subsidy.  But the real rub to this is, I am responsible for multiple business data accounts on AT&T, all of which are on simple renewals and being courted by your competitors.  As the person responsible, I get to choose which carrier I should be using.  So my two options are:

 

1.  Stay with AT&T pay the $215 Early Upgrade ($250 - credit) and keep paying my $115 a month bill, keep multiple data lines each paying $600+ a month for my corporate clients.

 

2. Pay the ETF, goto another carrier and get a bill $20-30 less a month, move all the corporate accounts off and lower their monthly data rates (in some cases by more than 1/2). and basically get more for the money and better coverage. Oh and avoid using AT&T services in all future endeavors.

 

As a long time AT&T Customer (more than a decade), this decision doesn't make sense.  Last year it didn't make sense, this year it doesn't make sense.  So I guess AT&T is forcing me to go with option 2.  Smart move.

 

C. Olliff

IT Consultant

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Re: AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost


colliff wrote:

Dear AT&T.

 

Someone really needs to rethink your hardline stance concerning upgrading clients with high monthly phone rates.  I just got off the phone with AT&T Reps including retention due to my situation.  I currently have an ETF of $215.  I upgraded last year to the iPhone 5 (Early Oct. 2013).  Last year I had to battle with Retention to make the point that your early upgrade cost of $250 did not make sense since I could quite AT&T for less money.  I am again in this situation.  I am attempting to Upgrade my phone to the 5S, give my phone to my life partner and merge him onto my account.  His AT&T account is fully outside of contract since he has always gotten my older phones.  So I called in and this time, like last time, retention agreed that yes my ETF was lower, but they really couldn't do anything other than credit me $25 and then give me the phone at a subsidy.  But the real rub to this is, I am responsible for multiple business data accounts on AT&T, all of which are on simple renewals and being courted by your competitors.  As the person responsible, I get to choose which carrier I should be using.  So my two options are:

 

1.  Stay with AT&T pay the $215 Early Upgrade ($250 - credit) and keep paying my $115 a month bill, keep multiple data lines each paying $600+ a month for my corporate clients.

 

2. Pay the ETF, goto another carrier and get a bill $20-30 less a month, move all the corporate accounts off and lower their monthly data rates (in some cases by more than 1/2). and basically get more for the money and better coverage. Oh and avoid using AT&T services in all future endeavors.

 

As a long time AT&T Customer (more than a decade), this decision doesn't make sense.  Last year it didn't make sense, this year it doesn't make sense.  So I guess AT&T is forcing me to go with option 2.  Smart move.

 

C. Olliff

IT Consultant


you signed a contract that stated for a subsidized phone you would agree to a 2 year contract for that privilige. Now you want them to allow you to get a new phone for a subsidized cost even thugh you have not completed the previous contract you agreed to, you should understand binding agreements since you are a consultant, do you try and do the same thing with who ever you contract to for work?

There is no need to "rethink" the hardline stance when it comes to a binding contract fulfillment, the terms are set forth, your signature is on the binding agreement. ATT is not "forcing you" to go with option 2, you are doing it becasue you are not getting what you want.

 

Curious as to how you would spin the proposal to who ever you are contracted to for maintaining the cell phone contracts, if any of the consultants that work for my firm came to me with that they had better have a rock solid argument for breaking an existing agreement to move to a new carrier, including the fall out for what ever other services are provided by the carrier - POT's internet access, voip services, the OC48, like most businesses I run the majority of my businesses services through a single provider under a blanket service agreement. have other carriers for other locations and for fail over at teh primary location. As a long time customer of att (going back to beofre the court ordered break up of mommy bell), I don;t expect any special handling by att or any vendor that I do business with beyond them providing what is agreed to.

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Re: AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost

Well the issue of the spin is quite simple.  The contracts are fullfilled and the clients have been requesting new proposals on options.  The issue with me, is simple, AT&T is asking me to pay basically the ETF, to get the new phone, and extend my contract by 2 years while paying more per month for my service level than any other competitor in my area (Silicon Valley).  Second, the service in my area is spotty at best and I have tolerated it simply because it was simpler than change and because I had a contract (which I believe in).  I plan to get the new phone, and I am planning to stay with a provider.  But if I have to pay the ETF to get the phone, what is my incentive to remain with this level of service and why should I keep my clients here if I can reduce their monthly bills with a new provider.  That is why I am stating the numbers don't make much sense.  I understand AT&T like all other providers have subsidized the phones to attract people.  I understand they are in the business to make money. When you have a situation like this, the rules sometimes have to be examined (BTW this was AT&T's retention groups response last year and today). 

 

BTW, over the last 20 years I have worked with AT&T on mulitple data lines (from old ISDN - Multi Bonded T1 Lines)  for various clients including local/state/federal agencies, AT&T has used the common business practice of trying to entice users to their services from vendors.  In the past it was a no brainer in our area, because they had the best service.  Today that is not the case.  Major vendors in the area provide a faster, more reliable, and cheaper service in the area.  Our clients have tended to stay on a month to month basis with AT&T to reduce any conversion costs, now might be the time to consider changing that stance.  It is an option that I can take.  

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Re: AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost


colliff wrote:

Well the issue of the spin is quite simple.  The contracts are fullfilled and the clients have been requesting new proposals on options.  The issue with me, is simple, AT&T is asking me to pay basically the ETF, to get the new phone, and extend my contract by 2 years while paying more per month for my service level than any other competitor in my area (Silicon Valley).  Second, the service in my area is spotty at best and I have tolerated it simply because it was simpler than change and because I had a contract (which I believe in).  I plan to get the new phone, and I am planning to stay with a provider.  But if I have to pay the ETF to get the phone, what is my incentive to remain with this level of service and why should I keep my clients here if I can reduce their monthly bills with a new provider.  That is why I am stating the numbers don't make much sense.  I understand AT&T like all other providers have subsidized the phones to attract people.  I understand they are in the business to make money. When you have a situation like this, the rules sometimes have to be examined (BTW this was AT&T's retention groups response last year and today). 

 

BTW, over the last 20 years I have worked with AT&T on mulitple data lines (from old ISDN - Multi Bonded T1 Lines)  for various clients including local/state/federal agencies, AT&T has used the common business practice of trying to entice users to their services from vendors.  In the past it was a no brainer in our area, because they had the best service.  Today that is not the case.  Major vendors in the area provide a faster, more reliable, and cheaper service in the area.  Our clients have tended to stay on a month to month basis with AT&T to reduce any conversion costs, now might be the time to consider changing that stance.  It is an option that I can take.  


Assuming from your first post you meant October 2012 and not 2013, your upgrade date is over a year away, 13 months to be more accurate (the upgrade period was changed to 24 months awhile back), stil cannot understand why you feel you should be able to get a new device 13 months before your upgrade date. You are not even in the range of being qualified for a early upgrade. You should understand the importance of holding to a contractual agreement.  Good luck in what ever you decide.

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Re: AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost

Well just finished working with AT&T retention again.  This time the person was far more interested in what I had mentioned about the ETF and the Early Upgrade Costs.  I pointed out that I was not asking for special treatment, but that the numbers under their policy did not make sense and that if they wanted to stick with it, there was really no reason for me to stay with them in today's market.  She looked at my account paused, and agreed.  The issue is now resolved.  Everyone including AT&T is happy and the upgrade is continuing.  Like last year, she stated she would raise the issue that when the numbers are out of sink, the policy should be examined.  Well here is hoping until next year.

 

C. Olliff

 

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Re: AT&T Upgrade Policy when ETF is Less than Early Upgrade Cost


colliff wrote:

Well just finished working with AT&T retention again.  This time the person was far more interested in what I had mentioned about the ETF and the Early Upgrade Costs.  I pointed out that I was not asking for special treatment, but that the numbers under their policy did not make sense and that if they wanted to stick with it, there was really no reason for me to stay with them in today's market.  She looked at my account paused, and agreed.  The issue is now resolved.  Everyone including AT&T is happy and the upgrade is continuing.  Like last year, she stated she would raise the issue that when the numbers are out of sink, the policy should be examined.  Well here is hoping until next year.

 

C. Olliff

 


I am glad to hear that it worked out for you.Smiley Happy

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