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Posted Jan 18, 2008
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USB vs PCI card
Can anyone list the merits of a USB connect card vs the PCI type connect card?
Thank you
Can anyone list the merits of a USB connect card vs the PCI type connect card?
Thank you

USB vs PCI card

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Jan 18, 2008 10:58:23 AM
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I chose the USB card because I have 2 notebooks that I want to use it for, one with PCMCIA card and one with ExpressCard.  Also, I may want/need to use it with a desktop at some point.  With the USB device, I can use it for all workstations.
 
Yes, I realize I can get the ExpressCard, and then get an adapter to have it work in PCMCIA slot, and another adapter to make it work in USB port.  But that did not make much sense to me as just getting the USB modem to begin with; I don't have to "buy" two other conversion adapters and carry them around.
I chose the USB card because I have 2 notebooks that I want to use it for, one with PCMCIA card and one with ExpressCard.  Also, I may want/need to use it with a desktop at some point.  With the USB device, I can use it for all workstations.
 
Yes, I realize I can get the ExpressCard, and then get an adapter to have it work in PCMCIA slot, and another adapter to make it work in USB port.  But that did not make much sense to me as just getting the USB modem to begin with; I don't have to "buy" two other conversion adapters and carry them around.

Re: USB vs PCI card

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Jan 18, 2008 11:32:09 AM
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If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),

Re: USB vs PCI card

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Jan 18, 2008 1:24:12 PM
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asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.

Re: USB vs PCI card

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Jan 18, 2008 3:44:52 PM
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Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.

Re: USB vs PCI card

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Jan 18, 2008 6:46:13 PM
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DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster. (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.) Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2. So for those computers, it's not as big a deal. But for some people, having the USB adapter sticking out is not desireable. I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception. WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector. Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops. Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots. (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.




I doubt we'll ever see HSDPA that will tax a usb 1.1 connection. We will have moved on long before HSDPA reaches the 14mbs theoretical limit. Also, AT&T is starting to become oversold and taxing the capacity in some areas. We could have had 7.2mbs a year ago but they are dragging on even 3.6 and getting ready to impose 5GB soft limits anyway so even if you had the faster speeds, it would only mean you could use up your quota in a few hours.


DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster. (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.) Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2. So for those computers, it's not as big a deal. But for some people, having the USB adapter sticking out is not desireable. I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception. WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector. Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops. Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots. (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.




I doubt we'll ever see HSDPA that will tax a usb 1.1 connection. We will have moved on long before HSDPA reaches the 14mbs theoretical limit. Also, AT&T is starting to become oversold and taxing the capacity in some areas. We could have had 7.2mbs a year ago but they are dragging on even 3.6 and getting ready to impose 5GB soft limits anyway so even if you had the faster speeds, it would only mean you could use up your quota in a few hours.

Re: USB vs PCI card

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DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),


Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.

I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.

Thank you DeeBat.  That was my point.  Although a USB1 port has a max limit of 12Mb, an older laptop with a slower USB chip, slower memory bus and slower processor will tend to not get anywhere near that speed.  Some of the last USB1.1 computers could get close.  But by then everyone had USB2 ports so it didn't make any difference.
 
While the speed of 3G should still fit the bandwidth of USB1, in reality, it's the computer that doesn't have the performance.  I was using a PCMCIA ethernet adapter on a 400MHz laptop.  (Not Cardbus either.)  I could get 10Mb transfer rate but not 100Mb.  When the card slot broke, I temporarily used a USB ethernet adapter.  Laptop had only USB1.0;  Not even 1.1 compliant.  I was not getting 100Mb, nor 10Mb.  Try 0.5Mb.  The same adapter on another laptop got above 10MB and almost to 100Mb.  I did not attempt to troubleshoot.  It wasn't worth it.  So it wasn't the adapter.  The throughput of that old laptop just did not give full USB speeds.
 
This is an extreme example as most people will not have a computer that slow anymore.  So the issue is really academic as what you are saying, Dave, is true of most computers in current use.  That the speed of all the adapters is the same, assuming relatively current hardware.  (On the other hand, my cousin refuses to give up his 500MHz laptop.  And I'm typing this on a Sony Vaio 1GHz with USB1 and only 802.11b. Smiley Happy )


DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster.  (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.)  Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2.  So for those computers, it's not as big a deal.  But for some people, having the USB  adapter sticking out is not desireable.  I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
 
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception.  WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector.  Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
 
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops.  Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots.  (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),


Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.

I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.

Thank you DeeBat.  That was my point.  Although a USB1 port has a max limit of 12Mb, an older laptop with a slower USB chip, slower memory bus and slower processor will tend to not get anywhere near that speed.  Some of the last USB1.1 computers could get close.  But by then everyone had USB2 ports so it didn't make any difference.
 
While the speed of 3G should still fit the bandwidth of USB1, in reality, it's the computer that doesn't have the performance.  I was using a PCMCIA ethernet adapter on a 400MHz laptop.  (Not Cardbus either.)  I could get 10Mb transfer rate but not 100Mb.  When the card slot broke, I temporarily used a USB ethernet adapter.  Laptop had only USB1.0;  Not even 1.1 compliant.  I was not getting 100Mb, nor 10Mb.  Try 0.5Mb.  The same adapter on another laptop got above 10MB and almost to 100Mb.  I did not attempt to troubleshoot.  It wasn't worth it.  So it wasn't the adapter.  The throughput of that old laptop just did not give full USB speeds.
 
This is an extreme example as most people will not have a computer that slow anymore.  So the issue is really academic as what you are saying, Dave, is true of most computers in current use.  That the speed of all the adapters is the same, assuming relatively current hardware.  (On the other hand, my cousin refuses to give up his 500MHz laptop.  And I'm typing this on a Sony Vaio 1GHz with USB1 and only 802.11b. Smiley Happy )

Re: USB vs PCI card

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Davesworld wrote:


DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster. (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.) Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2. So for those computers, it's not as big a deal. But for some people, having the USB adapter sticking out is not desireable. I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception. WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector. Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops. Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots. (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.




I doubt we'll ever see HSDPA that will tax a usb 1.1 connection. We will have moved on long before HSDPA reaches the 14mbs theoretical limit. Also, AT&T is starting to become oversold and taxing the capacity in some areas. We could have had 7.2mbs a year ago but they are dragging on even 3.6 and getting ready to impose 5GB soft limits anyway so even if you had the faster speeds, it would only mean you could use up your quota in a few hours.




USB 1.1 is 1.5 Megabits/Second (187 kilobytes a second) theoretical. These speeds are only theoretical. Actual speeds will no doubt be a bit less. AT&T is operating a 3G/HSDPA network, called BroadbandConnect... It provides average download speeds of around 1.5 megabits per second (mbit/s), with bursts up to 3.6 megabits per second (Mbit/s). [Wikipedia] So I think that HSDPA can tax USB 1.1 - at least somewhat.

Note that various factions have created some confusion in regards to USB 1.1 and USB 2.0. Some say USB 1.1 has two speeds (low speed 1.5 MB/S and full speed 12 MB/S), and one USB 2.0 (high speed at 60 MB/S). Others say USB 1.1 is 1.5 MB/S and that USB 2.0 has two speeds (12 MB/S full speed and 60 MB/S high speed).

Davesworld wrote:


DeeBat wrote:


Davesworld wrote:


asatoran wrote:
If you have an older laptop without USB2, then a PC card would be faster. (I'm assuming your mean PC as in PCMCIA not PCI.) Newer laptops with the Expresscard type PC card slot usually have USB2. So for those computers, it's not as big a deal. But for some people, having the USB adapter sticking out is not desireable. I for one have broken USB dongles because I accidentally lifted the laptop and bend the USB connector.
One advatange that the USB adapter has over the card adapters is that with a readily available USB extension cord, you can easily "raise the antenna" higher to get better reception. WIth the card adapters, you need to get an external antenna with an appropriate connector. Not impossible, but not as easy as finding a USB extension.
Also, the USB adapter will work with desktop computers as well as laptops. Most desktops do not come with PCMCIA nor Expresscard slots. (Although you can get PCI->PCMCIA adapters.),





Not true. All 3G cards use serial usb to connect through and any way you slice it, you have a usb controller sitting on a pci bus whether built into the board or built into a pcmcia card. In the case of an ExpressCard, it uses only the usb portion of that. You won't see one iota difference in speed due to the form factor. The best of all worlds is the ExpressCard which can use a usb adapter that slips around it since we are only using the usb portion of the card in the case of 3G or a pcmcia caddy which has NEC usb controllers built into the caddy. Then you can use the device on anything out there.




I am not going to say I am the authority on this, but I do question the above. Older laptops use USB 1.1 (187 kB/S) or possibly USB 2.0 Full Speed (1.5 MB/S), which is slower than USB 2.0 High Speed (60 MB/S). If you own one of these laptops with a slow 1.1 USB connection, you can buy a PCMCIA card that will give you USB 2.0 ports (I know, I own one of these myself). So theoretically, *if* the USB interface is built into the AirCard PC Card, that could allow a faster connection (vs a card that plugs into the USB jack) on older laptops that only have USB 1.1.




I doubt we'll ever see HSDPA that will tax a usb 1.1 connection. We will have moved on long before HSDPA reaches the 14mbs theoretical limit. Also, AT&T is starting to become oversold and taxing the capacity in some areas. We could have had 7.2mbs a year ago but they are dragging on even 3.6 and getting ready to impose 5GB soft limits anyway so even if you had the faster speeds, it would only mean you could use up your quota in a few hours.




USB 1.1 is 1.5 Megabits/Second (187 kilobytes a second) theoretical. These speeds are only theoretical. Actual speeds will no doubt be a bit less. AT&T is operating a 3G/HSDPA network, called BroadbandConnect... It provides average download speeds of around 1.5 megabits per second (mbit/s), with bursts up to 3.6 megabits per second (Mbit/s). [Wikipedia] So I think that HSDPA can tax USB 1.1 - at least somewhat.

Note that various factions have created some confusion in regards to USB 1.1 and USB 2.0. Some say USB 1.1 has two speeds (low speed 1.5 MB/S and full speed 12 MB/S), and one USB 2.0 (high speed at 60 MB/S). Others say USB 1.1 is 1.5 MB/S and that USB 2.0 has two speeds (12 MB/S full speed and 60 MB/S high speed).

Re: USB vs PCI card

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