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Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

This is double billing pure and simple. If you pay for a data plan and it is advertised as unlimited, this means you get to download as much as you want from your phone device. If your "unlimited" plan isn't unlimited, this is false advertising and a class action lawsuit should be thrown at the carrier already, but if I decide I want to tether the phone to a laptop or tablet, if you are still using the unlimited plan you are already paying for. A tethering subscription is double billing. This is ripe for a class action lawsuit. All it needs to start is people continuing to jailbreak or root their phones and tether and refusing to pay the fees and if enough people do this the media will swarm and some lawyer will jump all offer a class action for the other people who did pay the fees. It's about time we do something about it. Data is data, and we're already paying (dearly) for it. Why do we have to pay more for the same data if it comes from a tethered laptop or any other device? It is double billing and we need to organize ourselves and seriously protest this type of biased measures from telcos.

 

Does Comcast charge me for tethering my laptop to my wireless router?  No.  Does it charge me for how many machines are on my network? No.

 

We are the only country where the telcos stick it to us in every way, shape, or form.  I'm sick of it.  If I have an unlimited data plan then I have an unlimited data plan whether I choose to access it from my iPhone or a tethered device.  There is NO difference.  I hope someone sues and we get our freedom to use the device as we choose back, we are doing NOTHING wrong by tethering.  Also, if you're so concerned about people abusing the cap, then ENFORCE IT, but don't make people pay out the nose for an additional service that's no different than connecting to a wireless hot spot at Starbucks. 

 

Rip off artists to the end.

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Message 1 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff


wingrider01 wrote:

qb.84 wrote:
Yes I get it. You all like to pay for something the phone you bought does for you. Either all of you work for AT&T or you're all very naive. Keep agreeing to everything and soon you'll end up paying for the ability to pay your bills too.

You are making numerous errors in your assumptions - first unless there is a dislcaimer about it being their opinion and not ATT's they are not employees of ATT.

 

Second if you are tetheirng now, go ahead and keep doing it - on the 27th of this month you will get a notice that if you continue to violate the terms of your cellular service agreement by tethering without paying for it, ATT will enfore their legal right to add what eer is required to your account to bring you into legal agreement with your cellular service agreement - aka they will add what ever is required to make you legal - and there is not a thing you can do about it - if you terminate your contract, you owe the etf

 

Third just because you have bought a phone that has the ability to tether you cannot use it unless you pay the bill for the ability, my shelby cobra (phone) will top 170 mph easily, just becasue it can do it does not mean I can on the highway (data charges), if I want to do it I have to pay to rent a private track (tethering charges) that has no speed limit.


Your analogy is flawed. It works more like this. AT&T gives you gas for a car. Why should I pay extra for using that gas on another car if at the end the amount is going to be the same? That "private track" is already yours when you bought the phone. Try again!

Also, it wouldnt be the first company that hires people to make them look good on forums, reviews, etc

Message 46 of 137
Scholar

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

Because if people didn't pay extra for the gas, everyone would be on the highway causing congestion.
Message 47 of 137
ACE - Professor

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

 


qb.84 wrote:
Yes I get it. You all like to pay for something the phone you bought does for you. Either all of you work for AT&T or you're all very naive. Keep agreeing to everything and soon you'll end up paying for the ability to pay your bills too.

If you don't agree to the terms of a contract, the traditional response is to NOT sign the contract.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 48 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff


Javeon wrote:
Because if people didn't pay extra for the gas, everyone would be on the highway causing congestion.
That's if everyone had unlimited gas but this is not the case. You pay for 2 Gl then let me use it however I want.
Message 49 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

 


johninsj wrote:

 


qb.84 wrote:
Yes I get it. You all like to pay for something the phone you bought does for you. Either all of you work for AT&T or you're all very naive. Keep agreeing to everything and soon you'll end up paying for the ability to pay your bills too.

If you don't agree to the terms of a contract, the traditional response is to NOT sign the contract.

 


 

I think I have the right to complain, and at the end if they really care about their customers ( must important rule in managing an organization) they would understand the point we are trying to make. Of course we have people like you who would rather get screwed and not complain. Typical American attitude.
Message 50 of 137
Scholar

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

If you don't have two passengers in your car, you can't use the carpool lane. If you don't have the tethering service, you can't tether.


qb.84 wrote:

Javeon wrote:
Because if people didn't pay extra for the gas, everyone would be on the highway causing congestion.
That's if everyone had unlimited gas but this is not the case. You pay for 2 Gl then let me use it however I want.
Message 51 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

Nice try but they are both free. This would be like getting a regular plan vs family plan. Nothing to do with tether.

You can make all the analogies you want. Yes it is their rules but just because they say so doesn't make it right. If you like to pay extra for something you already own, hey go ahead no one is stopping you. Lucky for the wireless companies they have a bunch of people ( not so bright ) who are willing to do so.

Message 52 of 137
Scholar

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

The gas in your car doesn't allow you to drive anywhere. Certain conditions must be met. If not, the driver must chose a different way or else getting fined. How's your analogy working for ya?
Message 53 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

The question is not why can't I drive to a certain place is why can't I use the gas I paid for to get there lol.
Message 54 of 137
ACE - Professor

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

 


qb.84 wrote:

Nice try but they are both free. This would be like getting a regular plan vs family plan. Nothing to do with tether.

You can make all the analogies you want. Yes it is their rules but just because they say so doesn't make it right. If you like to pay extra for something you already own, hey go ahead no one is stopping you. Lucky for the wireless companies they have a bunch of people ( not so bright ) who are willing to do so.


 

What makes it right was YOUR AGREEMENT TO THE TERMS when you SIGNED YOUR CONTRACT.

 

YOU made it right. If you didn't agree with the terms, why did you sign the contract?

 

Why can't you just admit you agreed to the terms, and now you don't like them? Because then at least we could all agree you have the ability to read and understand your contract. I can totally agree with you that you don't like your contract terms, or the way AT&T structures its charges.

 

I wish AT&T offered all its services for free. I sure could use the extra money.

 

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 55 of 137
ACE - Professor

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

 


qb.84 wrote:

 


johninsj wrote:

 


qb.84 wrote:
Yes I get it. You all like to pay for something the phone you bought does for you. Either all of you work for AT&T or you're all very naive. Keep agreeing to everything and soon you'll end up paying for the ability to pay your bills too.

If you don't agree to the terms of a contract, the traditional response is to NOT sign the contract.

 


 

I think I have the right to complain, and at the end if they really care about their customers ( must important rule in managing an organization) they would understand the point we are trying to make. Of course we have people like you who would rather get screwed and not complain. Typical American attitude.

 

What's typical is to whine after agreeing to something, after the fact.

 

You can complain to AT&T. This is a user forum, right now you're complaining to fellow users.

 

I totally understand you want something for nothing, and you think you should be able to selectively ignore parts of your contract. That's not really the way the world works, however.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 56 of 137
Scholar

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

Just because you put gas in your car doesn't mean you can drive it anywhere, just like putting data on your phone doesn't mean you can use it anywhere.
Message 57 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

Hey, you're right if we can both agree that this service is not provided by them but is something the iPhone can do on it's own. That's the point I'm trying to make. This is not about their terms, this is about why their terms need to change. I don't want free service, I want fair service.
Message 58 of 137
Teacher

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff


johninsj wrote:

 


qb.84 wrote:

 


johninsj wrote:

 


qb.84 wrote:
Yes I get it. You all like to pay for something the phone you bought does for you. Either all of you work for AT&T or you're all very naive. Keep agreeing to everything and soon you'll end up paying for the ability to pay your bills too.

If you don't agree to the terms of a contract, the traditional response is to NOT sign the contract.

 


 

I think I have the right to complain, and at the end if they really care about their customers ( must important rule in managing an organization) they would understand the point we are trying to make. Of course we have people like you who would rather get screwed and not complain. Typical American attitude.

 

What's typical is to whine after agreeing to something, after the fact.

 

You can complain to AT&T. This is a user forum, right now you're complaining to fellow users.

 

I totally understand you want something for nothing, and you think you should be able to selectively ignore parts of your contract. That's not really the way the world works, however.

 


I never said I wanted something for nothing. I said if I'm paying for 2 GB what difference does it make to use it on my phone or laptop.

Message 59 of 137
Contributor

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

     AT&T is handling all of this data capping very sloppily. At the very least, it is reflecting very badly on their company as a whole in terms of being able to handle a data infused future. I'm both a U-verse and AT&T mobile subscriber, and have had the iPhone since day one. First, dropping the unlimited data plan, then capping U-Verse data, now this tethering business; Regardless of which side of the argument you land on, there are clearly some issues going on with AT&T and their network.

 

     Anybody that has had the iPhone through its previous iterations has been agitated by AT&T's inability to keep up with the iPhone's demands (both from its customers and from its hardware/software). The major point of frustration is that the phone itself is capable of many things, but is being held back by a carrier that seems unable or unwilling to let it breathe. Right out of the box, the original iPhone 2G was limited to SMS texting. When Apple released the 3.0 software, AT&T delayed MMS and tethering whereas nearly 30 other carriers were ready to go. It's things like this that drain my enthusiasm as a customer and diminish the impact of the phone.

 

     However, I believe Steve Jobs when he said at the D8 conference that any network would have had these problems if suddenly burdened with this many iPhones. Thus, I understand that there is a transition taking place and AT&T was the first network to be plagued with the problems that, in turn, spawn a robust network. Verizon had ample opportunity to widen their already wide spectrum and prepare for their smartphones, and now the iPhone. But the way the iPhone works is very simple and its relationship with AT&T (and now Verizon and other providers around the world) is unprecedented: Apple handles everything on the phone side and the carrier handles the data/voice. Up until now, any phone problems were handled by Apple's software updates, and any data/voice issues were tackled by AT&T. For a while, these two sides of the phone were pacing well together. Say what you will about the incremental updates in hardware/software of the iPhone, but you cannot deny that it keeps getting better. As such, owning an iPhone (and any smartphone nowadays) certainly feels like the future. It feels like evolution. But perhaps the most counterproductive and counterintuitive element to the smartphone equation is the carrier. Whereas the iPhone keeps adding features to address concerns, AT&T seems to be removing features (or at least limiting them) to maintain network integrity. I want to emphasize that I've never complained about it and have taken it in stride and, like most people, understand that Apple has made an ambitious product that is often ahead of its time.

 

     I can't speak for everyone, but with all that said, I feel that these carriers (and my experience is limited to just US carriers, mind you) are holding me back. That by capping data and limiting features, it is limited progress, and to put it in less dramatic terms, is screwing with my user experience of otherwise great devices. As far as this tethering issue goes specifically, I understand the problem. I think everybody does. Anyone here defending or giving their opinion about bandwidth issues and why they happen are met with ubiquitous agreement. AT&T is a telecommunications company and they are having issues, we get it – I understand the problem. What I don't understand is their solution, at least in its current form. Obviously, they are trying to address uninhibited gross data usage. If one cannot have literally unlimited data, then logically there must be a line (aka a cap). Create wherever the line needs to be at a price point that is agreeable to customers, penalties for going over, and done: ostensibly a way to solve the bandwidth issue.

 

     So why is tethering a problem? Why is this even AT&T's concern how I use their data? The agreement between the iPhone and AT&T (and other carries) is the carrier brings the data to the phone, and the iPhone does what it wants with it. If I want to download an app, stream video, post media to Facebook, etc. I am able to do that. Data is data equals data. If I have x-amount of gigabytes on my plan, and I'll be penalized more money for going over, then I am absolutely perplexed as to how the nature of its usage is of any concern to AT&T, particularly because I am of the opinion that it all equals 1's and 0's to them. Therefore, if tethering is not a bandwidth problem, I am left to conclude that AT&T is trying to charge for it simply because they can, and that is a deplorable way to treat customers.

 

     In today's smartphone environment, tethering is no more "feature" of AT&T than Bluetooth gaming, or using Airplay to stream videos from my phone to my TV using Air Video's media streaming app. In those examples, you have the phone appropriating data to another device. With Airplay, it is even possible to be using AT&T's data and sending it to another device via certain protocols, which is essentially a type of tethering. An even better example is Chevrolet's MyLink integration that uses your phone's 3G service to power its own native apps which include Pandora and Stitcher. If we sustain a wireless data model that prices certain kinds of data usage as "premium" and others "basic" when it is all the same data, then wonderful technologies such as the one's mentioned will at the very least have an attenuated chance of success, or at worst, completely fail because some carrier somewhere said, "hey, I could charge people for using their data this way, and also that way." That is but only one pitfall of many that can result from allowing this to happen. I hope AT&T gets serious backlash for this, and it appears they will. I just hope it's enough to restructure their approach to this. Cap data to save your network, but don't dress up tethering as some kind of privilege. To quote the great Tyler Durden, "sticking feathers up your butt does not make you a chicken".    

Message 60 of 137
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