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Posted Mar 18, 2011
11:17:17 AM
Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff
Edited by IPhone3GSOwner on Mar 18, 2011 at 11:17:45 AM

This is double billing pure and simple. If you pay for a data plan and it is advertised as unlimited, this means you get to download as much as you want from your phone device. If your "unlimited" plan isn't unlimited, this is false advertising and a class action lawsuit should be thrown at the carrier already, but if I decide I want to tether the phone to a laptop or tablet, if you are still using the unlimited plan you are already paying for. A tethering subscription is double billing. This is ripe for a class action lawsuit. All it needs to start is people continuing to jailbreak or root their phones and tether and refusing to pay the fees and if enough people do this the media will swarm and some lawyer will jump all offer a class action for the other people who did pay the fees. It's about time we do something about it. Data is data, and we're already paying (dearly) for it. Why do we have to pay more for the same data if it comes from a tethered laptop or any other device? It is double billing and we need to organize ourselves and seriously protest this type of biased measures from telcos.

 

Does Comcast charge me for tethering my laptop to my wireless router?  No.  Does it charge me for how many machines are on my network? No.

 

We are the only country where the telcos stick it to us in every way, shape, or form.  I'm sick of it.  If I have an unlimited data plan then I have an unlimited data plan whether I choose to access it from my iPhone or a tethered device.  There is NO difference.  I hope someone sues and we get our freedom to use the device as we choose back, we are doing NOTHING wrong by tethering.  Also, if you're so concerned about people abusing the cap, then ENFORCE IT, but don't make people pay out the nose for an additional service that's no different than connecting to a wireless hot spot at Starbucks. 

 

Rip off artists to the end.

This is double billing pure and simple. If you pay for a data plan and it is advertised as unlimited, this means you get to download as much as you want from your phone device. If your "unlimited" plan isn't unlimited, this is false advertising and a class action lawsuit should be thrown at the carrier already, but if I decide I want to tether the phone to a laptop or tablet, if you are still using the unlimited plan you are already paying for. A tethering subscription is double billing. This is ripe for a class action lawsuit. All it needs to start is people continuing to jailbreak or root their phones and tether and refusing to pay the fees and if enough people do this the media will swarm and some lawyer will jump all offer a class action for the other people who did pay the fees. It's about time we do something about it. Data is data, and we're already paying (dearly) for it. Why do we have to pay more for the same data if it comes from a tethered laptop or any other device? It is double billing and we need to organize ourselves and seriously protest this type of biased measures from telcos.

 

Does Comcast charge me for tethering my laptop to my wireless router?  No.  Does it charge me for how many machines are on my network? No.

 

We are the only country where the telcos stick it to us in every way, shape, or form.  I'm sick of it.  If I have an unlimited data plan then I have an unlimited data plan whether I choose to access it from my iPhone or a tethered device.  There is NO difference.  I hope someone sues and we get our freedom to use the device as we choose back, we are doing NOTHING wrong by tethering.  Also, if you're so concerned about people abusing the cap, then ENFORCE IT, but don't make people pay out the nose for an additional service that's no different than connecting to a wireless hot spot at Starbucks. 

 

Rip off artists to the end.

Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Apr 21, 2011 6:04:49 PM
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stoneage wrote:

"tethering is a feature not a service."

I agree. It's in the phone already. All they have to do is throw a switch. They are making you pay to access data you already paid for.

 

"start hammering the network.  Maybe then AT&T will realize they can't keep crapping on their customers."

I wish this would happen, but realistically everybody has better things to do than tilt at windmills. I am having my 5 family plan members stream Netflix nonstop whenever they can. Then I am going to send the documented usage to AT&T with the last months data which is less than 500 MB for the whole family. 


as mentioned, will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data and put you on the tethered plan after you ignore their cease and desist requests.


stoneage wrote:

"tethering is a feature not a service."

I agree. It's in the phone already. All they have to do is throw a switch. They are making you pay to access data you already paid for.

 

"start hammering the network.  Maybe then AT&T will realize they can't keep crapping on their customers."

I wish this would happen, but realistically everybody has better things to do than tilt at windmills. I am having my 5 family plan members stream Netflix nonstop whenever they can. Then I am going to send the documented usage to AT&T with the last months data which is less than 500 MB for the whole family. 


as mentioned, will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data and put you on the tethered plan after you ignore their cease and desist requests.

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Apr 21, 2011 8:48:17 PM
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"will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data"

I can use all the data I want! I have an unlimited plan and I'm streaming video, which I have never done before on my iPhone. I'm not tethered (yet), but you can bet I'm going to jailbreak it soon. I can't believe anyone would defend this obvious ripoff by the people that got to monopolize the smart phone market. It's like buying apples at a grocery and then finding out you have to pay to get them out the front door.

"will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data"

I can use all the data I want! I have an unlimited plan and I'm streaming video, which I have never done before on my iPhone. I'm not tethered (yet), but you can bet I'm going to jailbreak it soon. I can't believe anyone would defend this obvious ripoff by the people that got to monopolize the smart phone market. It's like buying apples at a grocery and then finding out you have to pay to get them out the front door.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Apr 22, 2011 5:36:28 AM
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Edited by wingrider01 on Apr 22, 2011 at 5:41:55 AM

stoneage wrote:

"will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data"

I can use all the data I want! I have an unlimited plan and I'm streaming video, which I have never done before on my iPhone. I'm not tethered (yet), but you can bet I'm going to jailbreak it soon. I can't believe anyone would defend this obvious ripoff by the people that got to monopolize the smart phone market. It's like buying apples at a grocery and then finding out you have to pay to get them out the front door.


will not offer you good luck, but this interesting little tidbit for you to ponder. By the way why would I not defend them, after all, the legal department at my company brings charges agsinst companies that violate the terms of the service contract they have with us - their current success rate on recovering charges and additoinal damages is about 89 percent.

 

AT&T is clearly monitoring where data packets are being transmitted very closely and wants to kill unauthorized abuse of its network, but this is just ruthless. Here's AT&T's email threat:

"Our records show that you use this capability, but are not subscribed to our tethering plan... if we don't hear from you, we'll plan to automatically enroll you into DataPro 4GB after March 27, 2011. The new plan--whether you sign up on your own or we automatically enroll you--will replace your current smartphone data plan, including if you are on an unlimited data plan."

Whether you like it or not AT&T is sending out a message through its tether police and by the looks of it, there's really nothing that can be done if you resist.


stoneage wrote:

"will be interesting after you continue to "hammer the network" and they drop your unlimited data"

I can use all the data I want! I have an unlimited plan and I'm streaming video, which I have never done before on my iPhone. I'm not tethered (yet), but you can bet I'm going to jailbreak it soon. I can't believe anyone would defend this obvious ripoff by the people that got to monopolize the smart phone market. It's like buying apples at a grocery and then finding out you have to pay to get them out the front door.


will not offer you good luck, but this interesting little tidbit for you to ponder. By the way why would I not defend them, after all, the legal department at my company brings charges agsinst companies that violate the terms of the service contract they have with us - their current success rate on recovering charges and additoinal damages is about 89 percent.

 

AT&T is clearly monitoring where data packets are being transmitted very closely and wants to kill unauthorized abuse of its network, but this is just ruthless. Here's AT&T's email threat:

"Our records show that you use this capability, but are not subscribed to our tethering plan... if we don't hear from you, we'll plan to automatically enroll you into DataPro 4GB after March 27, 2011. The new plan--whether you sign up on your own or we automatically enroll you--will replace your current smartphone data plan, including if you are on an unlimited data plan."

Whether you like it or not AT&T is sending out a message through its tether police and by the looks of it, there's really nothing that can be done if you resist.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Apr 22, 2011 8:09:50 AM
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Okay, illegally tethering is one thing (i.e., I would not sympathize with someone who gets caught doing so), but I would not begrudge anyone who chooses to stream Netflix 24x7 on an unlimited data plan--assuming that he is using a legit Netflix account and/or is otherwise doing so on the up-and-up.  I mean--last I checked, the Netflix app is a legit app offered by a legit app store (iTunes store) and allowed for use on an iPhone or similar Apple device, and AFAICT there is nothing in anyone's T&Cs that dictate that the Netflix app must be used over Wifi only...so who is AT&T--or anyone else, for that matter--to tell someone exactly how he must use a legit third-party app like Netflix while connected to their network?  Besides, Netflix isn't the only legit app that allows video streaming over 3G--Youtube, Slingplayer, and Skype are other legit apps that come to mind; if AT&T was worried that their vaunted 3G network would be overwhelmed by (over)usage of such apps, they would have put their foot down and do everything in their power to prevent such apps from oversaturating their network.  Think of it this way--if you were on one of their tiered data plans, AT&T probably wouldn't stop you from using as much data as you want, as long as you pay for the overage; after all, does the 2 GB data plan state that it's $10 for each additional 1 GB of usage...up to an additional X GB maximum?  I seriously doubt that AT&T would complain and/or send me some kind of warning about using too much data if I chose to use an additional 10 GB of data on top of a 2 GB plan, as long as I agree to pay the additional $100 for the overage.

Okay, illegally tethering is one thing (i.e., I would not sympathize with someone who gets caught doing so), but I would not begrudge anyone who chooses to stream Netflix 24x7 on an unlimited data plan--assuming that he is using a legit Netflix account and/or is otherwise doing so on the up-and-up.  I mean--last I checked, the Netflix app is a legit app offered by a legit app store (iTunes store) and allowed for use on an iPhone or similar Apple device, and AFAICT there is nothing in anyone's T&Cs that dictate that the Netflix app must be used over Wifi only...so who is AT&T--or anyone else, for that matter--to tell someone exactly how he must use a legit third-party app like Netflix while connected to their network?  Besides, Netflix isn't the only legit app that allows video streaming over 3G--Youtube, Slingplayer, and Skype are other legit apps that come to mind; if AT&T was worried that their vaunted 3G network would be overwhelmed by (over)usage of such apps, they would have put their foot down and do everything in their power to prevent such apps from oversaturating their network.  Think of it this way--if you were on one of their tiered data plans, AT&T probably wouldn't stop you from using as much data as you want, as long as you pay for the overage; after all, does the 2 GB data plan state that it's $10 for each additional 1 GB of usage...up to an additional X GB maximum?  I seriously doubt that AT&T would complain and/or send me some kind of warning about using too much data if I chose to use an additional 10 GB of data on top of a 2 GB plan, as long as I agree to pay the additional $100 for the overage.

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Apr 22, 2011 8:44:39 AM
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tonester wrote:

...illegally tethering is one thing...


Just want to clarify one point and change the syntax we're using when referencing this scenario:

 

It is NOT illegal if you use unauthorized tethering.

 

You will not have criminal charges pressed, you will not be sent to jail, or have to pay a governmental body a penalty.

 

Typical violations of any sort of TOS is NOT a question of legality, since TOS's really have no standing in criminal law.

 

We have had a situation where AT&T for the longest time had an extremely small percentage of its customers violating the TOS by using jail broken phones and using tethering without authorization.

 

To handle that situation AT&T waited until the OS officially supported tethering, then changed the TOS so that using long existing technology, they can now detect who is tethering and, per the NEW TOS, automatically switch those people who were unauthorized tetherers to a tethering plan.

 

Let's be careful with the language, while AT&T would LOVE for us to believe if we break their TOS's we'll go to jail, the fact is, no, no you won't.


tonester wrote:

...illegally tethering is one thing...


Just want to clarify one point and change the syntax we're using when referencing this scenario:

 

It is NOT illegal if you use unauthorized tethering.

 

You will not have criminal charges pressed, you will not be sent to jail, or have to pay a governmental body a penalty.

 

Typical violations of any sort of TOS is NOT a question of legality, since TOS's really have no standing in criminal law.

 

We have had a situation where AT&T for the longest time had an extremely small percentage of its customers violating the TOS by using jail broken phones and using tethering without authorization.

 

To handle that situation AT&T waited until the OS officially supported tethering, then changed the TOS so that using long existing technology, they can now detect who is tethering and, per the NEW TOS, automatically switch those people who were unauthorized tetherers to a tethering plan.

 

Let's be careful with the language, while AT&T would LOVE for us to believe if we break their TOS's we'll go to jail, the fact is, no, no you won't.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Apr 23, 2011 8:15:06 AM
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DimentoGraven wrote:

tonester wrote:

...illegally tethering is one thing...


Just want to clarify one point and change the syntax we're using when referencing this scenario:

 

It is NOT illegal if you use unauthorized tethering.

 

You will not have criminal charges pressed, you will not be sent to jail, or have to pay a governmental body a penalty.

 

Typical violations of any sort of TOS is NOT a question of legality, since TOS's really have no standing in criminal law.

 

We have had a situation where AT&T for the longest time had an extremely small percentage of its customers violating the TOS by using jail broken phones and using tethering without authorization.

 

To handle that situation AT&T waited until the OS officially supported tethering, then changed the TOS so that using long existing technology, they can now detect who is tethering and, per the NEW TOS, automatically switch those people who were unauthorized tetherers to a tethering plan.

 

Let's be careful with the language, while AT&T would LOVE for us to believe if we break their TOS's we'll go to jail, the fact is, no, no you won't.


Well now you're talking semantics; since when did "illegal" equate only to "criminal", meaning-wise?  There are plenty of things that are "illegal", but in themselves don't make such violations "criminal"--ever watch football, where sometimes quarterbacks are called for making an "illegal forward pass"? Smiley Wink

 

 


DimentoGraven wrote:

tonester wrote:

...illegally tethering is one thing...


Just want to clarify one point and change the syntax we're using when referencing this scenario:

 

It is NOT illegal if you use unauthorized tethering.

 

You will not have criminal charges pressed, you will not be sent to jail, or have to pay a governmental body a penalty.

 

Typical violations of any sort of TOS is NOT a question of legality, since TOS's really have no standing in criminal law.

 

We have had a situation where AT&T for the longest time had an extremely small percentage of its customers violating the TOS by using jail broken phones and using tethering without authorization.

 

To handle that situation AT&T waited until the OS officially supported tethering, then changed the TOS so that using long existing technology, they can now detect who is tethering and, per the NEW TOS, automatically switch those people who were unauthorized tetherers to a tethering plan.

 

Let's be careful with the language, while AT&T would LOVE for us to believe if we break their TOS's we'll go to jail, the fact is, no, no you won't.


Well now you're talking semantics; since when did "illegal" equate only to "criminal", meaning-wise?  There are plenty of things that are "illegal", but in themselves don't make such violations "criminal"--ever watch football, where sometimes quarterbacks are called for making an "illegal forward pass"? Smiley Wink

 

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Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Apr 25, 2011 8:52:43 AM
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tonester wrote:

 

Well now you're talking semantics; since when did "illegal" equate only to "criminal", meaning-wise?  There are plenty of things that are "illegal", but in themselves don't make such violations "criminal"--ever watch football, where sometimes quarterbacks are called for making an "illegal forward pass"? Smiley Wink

 


Ahh, but really that's the cause of all these threads on the subject.  Initially when AT&T offered tethering for the iPhone, they charged an extra 20 dollars for the 'service', and did absolutely nothing more than enabled a feature on the phone.

 

They did not actually provide ANY new 'service', they were just billing monthly for having 'flipped a switch' once, a long time ago.

 

ONLY LATER did they create a third service tier, where you paid the extra 20 per month got tethering enabled AND had 4gb of data allotted to your account.

 

At least now the extra money you pay monthly has a substantive effect to your already existing service, mainly adding another 2gb.

Had AT&T initially offered tethering the way they're doing now, a lot of these threads would have never been started.


tonester wrote:

 

Well now you're talking semantics; since when did "illegal" equate only to "criminal", meaning-wise?  There are plenty of things that are "illegal", but in themselves don't make such violations "criminal"--ever watch football, where sometimes quarterbacks are called for making an "illegal forward pass"? Smiley Wink

 


Ahh, but really that's the cause of all these threads on the subject.  Initially when AT&T offered tethering for the iPhone, they charged an extra 20 dollars for the 'service', and did absolutely nothing more than enabled a feature on the phone.

 

They did not actually provide ANY new 'service', they were just billing monthly for having 'flipped a switch' once, a long time ago.

 

ONLY LATER did they create a third service tier, where you paid the extra 20 per month got tethering enabled AND had 4gb of data allotted to your account.

 

At least now the extra money you pay monthly has a substantive effect to your already existing service, mainly adding another 2gb.

Had AT&T initially offered tethering the way they're doing now, a lot of these threads would have never been started.

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Edited by Kelsyr on Jul 3, 2011 at 12:18:26 PM

Yes I am a new user, registered specifically to comment on this thread. 

 

First off, if you are defending att in this matter, you work for them, are a shareholder or are simply anti consumer (and probably not the sharpest tool in the shed). 

 

In defense of att (dont worry its a short list):

 

  1. the att network cannot handle huge amounts of data, If you remember at one point it was almost taken offline by the huge amount of data iphone users were using. Switching from unlimited is certainly acceptable and reasonable.
  2. There is an economics factor here. Law of supply and demand. Too many users using too much data on thier network so prices must be raised until enough users stop using as much data.

Unacceptable Practices by att:

 

  1. How i use my data is not any of att's business. I am paying for 2gb of data and it's none of ATT's business weather I foreward packets to my computer. It's the exact same to their network. If i pay for 200mb of data and tether thats my business. If i go over 200mb charge me more. I have seen many analagies on this thread but i dont think any are truly accurate. Its not like sun glasses or cable/satalite. Its more like getting water from the city. If the city wanted to charge me more to connect a hose to my faucet i would sue them. If there is a drought and they enforce a limit. I still have a choice of what to do with my water. If i choose to water my lawn instead of take showers. MY CHOICE. as long as i dont go over, no one else should have any legal authority. 
  2. ATT has a history of monopolizing and are clearly continuing on with their old ways. Now they have bought T-mobile, prices will go up and services will become more limited. Att also owns other parts of Verizon, not verizon mobile, but i am certain they influence Verizon mobiles decisions and prices. 
  3. Att has a general anti customer attitude and places unnecissary limits on technology just to have an excuse to charge. Every time i walk out of the att store i feel like i have been ripped off in one way or another. I have been screwged out of a replacement phone because a salesmen put insurance on the wrong phone line. (like i want insurance for an old nokia and not my android). The att microcell only allows 10 numbers , There is no reason for that. If i want to allow 100 phones on my microcell and my internet can handle it, then it should be fine. (i understand the microcell may only be able to handle so many connections, but it should only accept that many. There is no reason i should have to go on the att website and change allowed numbers everytime a new person comes over). They do charge you for data over microcell, which is actually going through your internet.

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.

Yes I am a new user, registered specifically to comment on this thread. 

 

First off, if you are defending att in this matter, you work for them, are a shareholder or are simply anti consumer (and probably not the sharpest tool in the shed). 

 

In defense of att (dont worry its a short list):

 

  1. the att network cannot handle huge amounts of data, If you remember at one point it was almost taken offline by the huge amount of data iphone users were using. Switching from unlimited is certainly acceptable and reasonable.
  2. There is an economics factor here. Law of supply and demand. Too many users using too much data on thier network so prices must be raised until enough users stop using as much data.

Unacceptable Practices by att:

 

  1. How i use my data is not any of att's business. I am paying for 2gb of data and it's none of ATT's business weather I foreward packets to my computer. It's the exact same to their network. If i pay for 200mb of data and tether thats my business. If i go over 200mb charge me more. I have seen many analagies on this thread but i dont think any are truly accurate. Its not like sun glasses or cable/satalite. Its more like getting water from the city. If the city wanted to charge me more to connect a hose to my faucet i would sue them. If there is a drought and they enforce a limit. I still have a choice of what to do with my water. If i choose to water my lawn instead of take showers. MY CHOICE. as long as i dont go over, no one else should have any legal authority. 
  2. ATT has a history of monopolizing and are clearly continuing on with their old ways. Now they have bought T-mobile, prices will go up and services will become more limited. Att also owns other parts of Verizon, not verizon mobile, but i am certain they influence Verizon mobiles decisions and prices. 
  3. Att has a general anti customer attitude and places unnecissary limits on technology just to have an excuse to charge. Every time i walk out of the att store i feel like i have been ripped off in one way or another. I have been screwged out of a replacement phone because a salesmen put insurance on the wrong phone line. (like i want insurance for an old nokia and not my android). The att microcell only allows 10 numbers , There is no reason for that. If i want to allow 100 phones on my microcell and my internet can handle it, then it should be fine. (i understand the microcell may only be able to handle so many connections, but it should only accept that many. There is no reason i should have to go on the att website and change allowed numbers everytime a new person comes over). They do charge you for data over microcell, which is actually going through your internet.

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Edited by wireless-user on Jul 3, 2011 at 3:53:55 PM

Kelsyr wrote:
<snip>

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.



You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 

You have some great points.

 

AT&T has been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon.

 

 


Kelsyr wrote:
<snip>

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.



You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 

You have some great points.

 

AT&T has been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon.

 

 

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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wireless-user wrote:

You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 


It looks like they arn't coming, i was kinda hoping they would...

 

 


wireless-user wrote:

You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 


It looks like they arn't coming, i was kinda hoping they would...

 

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wireless-user wrote:

Kelsyr wrote:
<snip>

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.



You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 

You have some great points.

 

AT&T has been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon.

 

 


here will correct yourerror in your comment

 

"Wireless Carriers have been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon."

 

Might as well be accurate on the statement -

 


wireless-user wrote:

Kelsyr wrote:
<snip>

Att clearly exploits its customers lack of technical knowledge and instead of trying to compete with competitors, strives to leave customes with no other choices. Att operates under the willingness to pay model and doesnt charge based on it's own costs. Many markets use this model, however the cell phone market is one of the only ones where competition does not drive down the prices. The cellphone industry is clearly in need of some regulation, ATT most of all.



You're in trouble now....  The usual AT&T fanboys will come out of the woodwork and explain why you are wrong.

 

You have some great points.

 

AT&T has been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon.

 

 


here will correct yourerror in your comment

 

"Wireless Carriers have been anti-consumer for a long time, they won't change soon."

 

Might as well be accurate on the statement -

 

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Jul 15, 2011 5:14:14 PM
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AT&T will never change on this issue. So I saved my old AT&T phone--an HTC Fuze. When I'm traveling and need to tether, I pop my SIM out of my iPhone 4, put it in a fullsize SIM adapter, stick it in the Fuze which has the latest cooked ROM on it, and start up the wireless hotspot on the Fuze. It's also a 3g device, meaning at some point this option will be useless. But for now iPhones have no faster data throughput than this jury-rigged arrangement. So I can tether anything with wi-fi and get 3g speed on my unlimited data plan, with no out-of-pocket at all.

 

So glad Apple decided to go with a removable SIM.

AT&T will never change on this issue. So I saved my old AT&T phone--an HTC Fuze. When I'm traveling and need to tether, I pop my SIM out of my iPhone 4, put it in a fullsize SIM adapter, stick it in the Fuze which has the latest cooked ROM on it, and start up the wireless hotspot on the Fuze. It's also a 3g device, meaning at some point this option will be useless. But for now iPhones have no faster data throughput than this jury-rigged arrangement. So I can tether anything with wi-fi and get 3g speed on my unlimited data plan, with no out-of-pocket at all.

 

So glad Apple decided to go with a removable SIM.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Jul 16, 2011 9:41:39 AM
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johninsj wrote:

You have unlimited use of data on the iPhone, per the terms of service you agreed to when you signed your contract.

 

This is getting boring. If you don't understand the terms of your contract, why did you sign it? If you disagreed with the terms of your contract, why did you sign it?

 

 

 

 


Read? That hurts my brain! LOL. Just another person who feels they are entitled to everything. It's amazing how people just continue to complain without know reading the documention.


johninsj wrote:

You have unlimited use of data on the iPhone, per the terms of service you agreed to when you signed your contract.

 

This is getting boring. If you don't understand the terms of your contract, why did you sign it? If you disagreed with the terms of your contract, why did you sign it?

 

 

 

 


Read? That hurts my brain! LOL. Just another person who feels they are entitled to everything. It's amazing how people just continue to complain without know reading the documention.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Jul 21, 2011 1:58:57 AM
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humancentipad
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*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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Edited by Phil-101 on Feb 18, 2012 at 4:34:04 PM

"If you don't understand the terms of your contract, then why did you sign it?"

 

 

 

I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says.

 

If you don't intend to provide unlimited data service, why do you say the words unlimited data when you sell the service... everyone on this forum knows the answer to that question.

 

Unlimited data IS available at UNTHROTTLED data rates, provided you pay for it. 

 

[Edited to comply with Guidelines]

 

"If you don't understand the terms of your contract, then why did you sign it?"

 

 

 

I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says.

 

If you don't intend to provide unlimited data service, why do you say the words unlimited data when you sell the service... everyone on this forum knows the answer to that question.

 

Unlimited data IS available at UNTHROTTLED data rates, provided you pay for it. 

 

[Edited to comply with Guidelines]

 

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

[ Edited ]
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Feb 18, 2012 6:01:49 PM
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rvc wrote:

"If you don't understand the terms of your contract, then why did you sign it?"

 

 

 

I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says.

 

If you don't intend to provide unlimited data service, why do you say the words unlimited data when you sell the service... everyone on this forum knows the answer to that question.

 

Unlimited data IS available at UNTHROTTLED data rates, provided you pay for it. 

 

[Edited to comply with Guidelines]

 



you realize you necro'd a post that was 7 months old and has nothing to do with unlimited data throttling right?

 

Love your comment  "I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says." becasue you better read and understand the fine print of any contrsct you you could possibly end up in a whole lot of hurt. The "fine print" of the agreement that you don;t care about spelled out exactly what could be done.


rvc wrote:

"If you don't understand the terms of your contract, then why did you sign it?"

 

 

 

I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says.

 

If you don't intend to provide unlimited data service, why do you say the words unlimited data when you sell the service... everyone on this forum knows the answer to that question.

 

Unlimited data IS available at UNTHROTTLED data rates, provided you pay for it. 

 

[Edited to comply with Guidelines]

 



you realize you necro'd a post that was 7 months old and has nothing to do with unlimited data throttling right?

 

Love your comment  "I don't really care what the fine print in the contract says." becasue you better read and understand the fine print of any contrsct you you could possibly end up in a whole lot of hurt. The "fine print" of the agreement that you don;t care about spelled out exactly what could be done.

Re: Tethering = Double Billing, AT&T Ripoff

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