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Posted Jul 16, 2011
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Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.
Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 16, 2011 at 3:19:55 PM

The question of why one would use a smartphone when a flip phone will work, is in the back of some people's mind. With that being said, I would like to open up a discussion thread just for the purpose of discussing pros and cons of smartphones vs basic phones.

 

The advantages of smartphones are:

  1. In high demand - this eventually will drive down the per unit cost of manufacturing, leading to lower prices. For example compare the retail price of 3G Pantech Breeze II with 3G LG Thrive Gophone, a smartphone.
  2. Can run Apps - many apps don't require data connection. For example, My Tracks (Google), calculators and most games.
  3. Have a unique form factor - the touch screen.
  4. Have 3G (eventually 4G) radios with automatic switching from 3G to 2G. Some can be manually switched to 2G for improved voice calling & texting.
  5. Many have Wifi calling for when you are inside a building and you are nowhere near a window, especially inside steel reinforced high rises.
  6. It seems that with a 3G capable GoPhone, there's a larger coverage in the US than with a 2G GoPhone.

The disadvantages are:

  1. Complexity and steep learning curve - some people may want just a basic flip phone.
  2. There's not yet a heavy duty smartphone. This may change in the future.
  3. Apps can drain battery fast.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

The question of why one would use a smartphone when a flip phone will work, is in the back of some people's mind. With that being said, I would like to open up a discussion thread just for the purpose of discussing pros and cons of smartphones vs basic phones.

 

The advantages of smartphones are:

  1. In high demand - this eventually will drive down the per unit cost of manufacturing, leading to lower prices. For example compare the retail price of 3G Pantech Breeze II with 3G LG Thrive Gophone, a smartphone.
  2. Can run Apps - many apps don't require data connection. For example, My Tracks (Google), calculators and most games.
  3. Have a unique form factor - the touch screen.
  4. Have 3G (eventually 4G) radios with automatic switching from 3G to 2G. Some can be manually switched to 2G for improved voice calling & texting.
  5. Many have Wifi calling for when you are inside a building and you are nowhere near a window, especially inside steel reinforced high rises.
  6. It seems that with a 3G capable GoPhone, there's a larger coverage in the US than with a 2G GoPhone.

The disadvantages are:

  1. Complexity and steep learning curve - some people may want just a basic flip phone.
  2. There's not yet a heavy duty smartphone. This may change in the future.
  3. Apps can drain battery fast.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 16, 2011 4:28:27 PM
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Nothing against smartphones but for me it'd be more than I need. One of the reasons I went with the RAZR2 is that it has excellent call quality, I mean after all that's what a phone is suppose to do, make calls Smiley Wink Also I like the phone's slim, sleek design and it's hefty and sturdy construction.

Nothing against smartphones but for me it'd be more than I need. One of the reasons I went with the RAZR2 is that it has excellent call quality, I mean after all that's what a phone is suppose to do, make calls Smiley Wink Also I like the phone's slim, sleek design and it's hefty and sturdy construction.

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Edited by hme83 on Jul 17, 2011 at 7:21:52 AM

ilikewireless wrote:

The question of why one would use a smartphone when a flip phone will work, is in the back of some people's mind. With that being said, I would like to open up a discussion thread just for the purpose of discussing pros and cons of smartphones vs basic phones.

 

The advantages of smartphones are:

  1. In high demand - this eventually will drive down the per unit cost of manufacturing, leading to lower prices. For example compare the retail price of 3G Pantech Breeze II with 3G LG Thrive Gophone, a smartphone.
  2. Can run Apps - many apps don't require data connection. For example, My Tracks (Google), calculators and most games.
  3. Have a unique form factor - the touch screen.
  4. Have 3G (eventually 4G) radios with automatic switching from 3G to 2G. Some can be manually switched to 2G for improved voice calling & texting.
  5. Many have Wifi calling for when you are inside a building and you are nowhere near a window, especially inside steel reinforced high rises.
  6. It seems that with a 3G capable GoPhone, there's a larger coverage in the US than with a 2G GoPhone.

The disadvantages are:

  1. Complexity and steep learning curve - some people may want just a basic flip phone.
  2. There's not yet a heavy duty smartphone. This may change in the future.
  3. Apps can drain battery fast.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 


1)  I'm not sure I understand your point here - the GoPhone LG Thrive is $179.99 vs. the GoPhone Pantech Breeze II's $168.99.  That's not a large price differential considering the Pantech Breeze is not a smartphone.  (Maybe that's your point.  lol.)  But I don't think you can compare across manufacturing lines - different manufacturers have different reputations for quality, etc.  You'd need to compare same manufacturer devices that have the same form factor, and same features outside of the operating system and the specific functionality that only the smartphone o/s can provide.

 

2)  I guess it depends on your definition of an "app" - all of my phones have calculators and games. Smiley Happy  And GPS can be resident on a non-smartphone.  My W518a has it and it is just a feature phone with SE's proprietary o/s.  It is simply dependent on the device having a GPS chip, and I used Google Maps on my W580i which doesn't have GPS, so it was simply based on cellular triangulation (same as my Nokia E70 smartphone).

 

3)  Many messaging oriented "feature" phones have touch screen functionality.  Whether you think that is a pro or a con is a matter of personal preference - I for one absolutely do not want a touch screen (only) device, and since I won't use the touch screen functionality, I'd prefer not to pay "extra" for it.  (lol)

 

4)  Most phones sold these days do contain a 3G radio - feature phone or smartphone - the technology is the industry standard at this point and manufacturers include WCDMA radios of some version.  What isn't standard yet is including WCDMA radios for all frequencies (850/1900, 900, 1700/2100) required for worldwide 3G service.  This is the same way it was with GSM until just a few years ago - manufacturers typically made tri-band GSM devices that were region specific (i.e. North American, Euro, etc.).  Now they are typically doing the same thing with the 3G bands.  Nokia makes a few phones with worldwide WCDMA radios, but you have to be willing to spend the money for a non-branded device. Smiley Wink  (Nokia N8 and E7 - both smartphones; they may make some feature phones with worldwide 3G frequencies as well.)

 

It is probably true that it is simpler to toggle between 3G vs. 2G network access on a smartphone, as in most smartphones the firmware contains a menu option.  Unfortunately the firmware on at&t branded feature phones tends to mask this menu option so that it isn't visible with an at&t SIM in the phone.  There are work arounds that have been found for at least some models from most manufacturers - Nokia is the only one that I specifically know of where I am not aware of anything having been identified.  Typically turning off/on 3G access in these devices consists of using a code to make the change, accessing the phone's internal memory from PC based software (i.e. MyPhoneExplorer for SE's), or inserting another carrier's SIM so that you can see the menu option (if the phone has been subsidy unlocked).

 

5) Is highly dependent on where you purchase your phones - i.e. whether you buy "branded" or non-branded devices.  There are a number of feature phones available with a WiFi radio.  (At&t in fact removed it from their own version of the SE C905i and their prepaid version of Nokia's C3.)

 

So in summary - when you limit yourself to using only at&t branded devices, yes - your perception of the differences between their smart vs. feature phone offerings is more accurate than not.  But there is an entire world of non-branded devices available to GSM users that may better suit their needs without sacrificing much of the functionality that they also desire.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


ilikewireless wrote:

The question of why one would use a smartphone when a flip phone will work, is in the back of some people's mind. With that being said, I would like to open up a discussion thread just for the purpose of discussing pros and cons of smartphones vs basic phones.

 

The advantages of smartphones are:

  1. In high demand - this eventually will drive down the per unit cost of manufacturing, leading to lower prices. For example compare the retail price of 3G Pantech Breeze II with 3G LG Thrive Gophone, a smartphone.
  2. Can run Apps - many apps don't require data connection. For example, My Tracks (Google), calculators and most games.
  3. Have a unique form factor - the touch screen.
  4. Have 3G (eventually 4G) radios with automatic switching from 3G to 2G. Some can be manually switched to 2G for improved voice calling & texting.
  5. Many have Wifi calling for when you are inside a building and you are nowhere near a window, especially inside steel reinforced high rises.
  6. It seems that with a 3G capable GoPhone, there's a larger coverage in the US than with a 2G GoPhone.

The disadvantages are:

  1. Complexity and steep learning curve - some people may want just a basic flip phone.
  2. There's not yet a heavy duty smartphone. This may change in the future.
  3. Apps can drain battery fast.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 


1)  I'm not sure I understand your point here - the GoPhone LG Thrive is $179.99 vs. the GoPhone Pantech Breeze II's $168.99.  That's not a large price differential considering the Pantech Breeze is not a smartphone.  (Maybe that's your point.  lol.)  But I don't think you can compare across manufacturing lines - different manufacturers have different reputations for quality, etc.  You'd need to compare same manufacturer devices that have the same form factor, and same features outside of the operating system and the specific functionality that only the smartphone o/s can provide.

 

2)  I guess it depends on your definition of an "app" - all of my phones have calculators and games. Smiley Happy  And GPS can be resident on a non-smartphone.  My W518a has it and it is just a feature phone with SE's proprietary o/s.  It is simply dependent on the device having a GPS chip, and I used Google Maps on my W580i which doesn't have GPS, so it was simply based on cellular triangulation (same as my Nokia E70 smartphone).

 

3)  Many messaging oriented "feature" phones have touch screen functionality.  Whether you think that is a pro or a con is a matter of personal preference - I for one absolutely do not want a touch screen (only) device, and since I won't use the touch screen functionality, I'd prefer not to pay "extra" for it.  (lol)

 

4)  Most phones sold these days do contain a 3G radio - feature phone or smartphone - the technology is the industry standard at this point and manufacturers include WCDMA radios of some version.  What isn't standard yet is including WCDMA radios for all frequencies (850/1900, 900, 1700/2100) required for worldwide 3G service.  This is the same way it was with GSM until just a few years ago - manufacturers typically made tri-band GSM devices that were region specific (i.e. North American, Euro, etc.).  Now they are typically doing the same thing with the 3G bands.  Nokia makes a few phones with worldwide WCDMA radios, but you have to be willing to spend the money for a non-branded device. Smiley Wink  (Nokia N8 and E7 - both smartphones; they may make some feature phones with worldwide 3G frequencies as well.)

 

It is probably true that it is simpler to toggle between 3G vs. 2G network access on a smartphone, as in most smartphones the firmware contains a menu option.  Unfortunately the firmware on at&t branded feature phones tends to mask this menu option so that it isn't visible with an at&t SIM in the phone.  There are work arounds that have been found for at least some models from most manufacturers - Nokia is the only one that I specifically know of where I am not aware of anything having been identified.  Typically turning off/on 3G access in these devices consists of using a code to make the change, accessing the phone's internal memory from PC based software (i.e. MyPhoneExplorer for SE's), or inserting another carrier's SIM so that you can see the menu option (if the phone has been subsidy unlocked).

 

5) Is highly dependent on where you purchase your phones - i.e. whether you buy "branded" or non-branded devices.  There are a number of feature phones available with a WiFi radio.  (At&t in fact removed it from their own version of the SE C905i and their prepaid version of Nokia's C3.)

 

So in summary - when you limit yourself to using only at&t branded devices, yes - your perception of the differences between their smart vs. feature phone offerings is more accurate than not.  But there is an entire world of non-branded devices available to GSM users that may better suit their needs without sacrificing much of the functionality that they also desire.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 17, 2011 9:05:05 AM
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Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.

Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.

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Professor hme83, thanks for sharing your thoughts.

 

When I tried to compare phones, I can't quite put a finger on them. You have enlightened us by pointing out some of the pitfalls, like comparing apples to oranges.

 

I like flip phones because they are lightweight, small and have long talk time, based on my observation. Mine has 7.5 hrs talk time and it's about the smallest and lightest cell phone I can find to fit easily in my shirt pocket. I neither favor smartphones nor basic flip phones as they all have their uses, and their market share. I feel that many branded ones are designed to make money for carriers :lol:, especially smartphones :lol: On the serious side, I feel for consumers who were charged left and right for things that they did not know could happen to their phones, like background tasks running in smartphones.

 

As manufacturers put more features into flip phones, like GPS and user-friendly calculator, the line between flip phones and smartphones is becoming blurred, in the area of functionality.

 

In the end, you are right that it is one's wallet and one's uses for phones, that dictate one's choice.

 

 

 

Professor hme83, thanks for sharing your thoughts.

 

When I tried to compare phones, I can't quite put a finger on them. You have enlightened us by pointing out some of the pitfalls, like comparing apples to oranges.

 

I like flip phones because they are lightweight, small and have long talk time, based on my observation. Mine has 7.5 hrs talk time and it's about the smallest and lightest cell phone I can find to fit easily in my shirt pocket. I neither favor smartphones nor basic flip phones as they all have their uses, and their market share. I feel that many branded ones are designed to make money for carriers :lol:, especially smartphones :lol: On the serious side, I feel for consumers who were charged left and right for things that they did not know could happen to their phones, like background tasks running in smartphones.

 

As manufacturers put more features into flip phones, like GPS and user-friendly calculator, the line between flip phones and smartphones is becoming blurred, in the area of functionality.

 

In the end, you are right that it is one's wallet and one's uses for phones, that dictate one's choice.

 

 

 

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 17, 2011 9:29:59 PM
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I don't know why, but I seem to prefer having a smartphone (without a data plan, of course Smiley Tongue) versus a regular flip phone. I've had two flip phones out of my six cell phones altogether and I can't say that I didn't like them. Neither of them were AT&T flip phones, but they were and still are incredibly easy to use.

The only thing that bothers me on flip phones is text messaging. It is so difficult to type every single little letter that you want using the keypad, pressing the same button multiple times sometimes. I would much rather just whip out my smartphone with a virtual keyboard and type away as fast I wanted, using the upwards keyboard or the sideways one - whichever one I feel like using. Other than that, they are solid, simple, and reliable - the way a cell phone should be.

I must be the type of person that likes all the bells and whistles... When I think about it, I can't see myself arguing with that. I have a passion for cell phones and as they advance every year, from the old Motorola DynaTAC to the Razr to today's top-of-the-line smartphones, you never know what they will be capable of accomplishing next to otherwise simplify our busy lives.

Cat Happy Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010 Cat Happy



I don't know why, but I seem to prefer having a smartphone (without a data plan, of course Smiley Tongue) versus a regular flip phone. I've had two flip phones out of my six cell phones altogether and I can't say that I didn't like them. Neither of them were AT&T flip phones, but they were and still are incredibly easy to use.

The only thing that bothers me on flip phones is text messaging. It is so difficult to type every single little letter that you want using the keypad, pressing the same button multiple times sometimes. I would much rather just whip out my smartphone with a virtual keyboard and type away as fast I wanted, using the upwards keyboard or the sideways one - whichever one I feel like using. Other than that, they are solid, simple, and reliable - the way a cell phone should be.

I must be the type of person that likes all the bells and whistles... When I think about it, I can't see myself arguing with that. I have a passion for cell phones and as they advance every year, from the old Motorola DynaTAC to the Razr to today's top-of-the-line smartphones, you never know what they will be capable of accomplishing next to otherwise simplify our busy lives.

:cathappy: Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010 :cathappy:



Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 17, 2011 9:55:22 PM
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As much as I love my phone it seems that flip phones are going the way of the Dodo. I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality. Unless Motorola comes out with a RAZR3, like they were going to, then I'll move on. Smiley Happy

As much as I love my phone it seems that flip phones are going the way of the Dodo. I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality. Unless Motorola comes out with a RAZR3, like they were going to, then I'll move on. Smiley Happy

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Jul 17, 2011 10:12:37 PM
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Razr8 wrote:

I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality.


It's pretty predictable that that is all there will be to choose from in the near future...which some people do not want nor need a smartphone. I'm just thinking that it will be harder for the elderly and other older folks to advance and get used to.

Cat Happy Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010 Cat Happy




Razr8 wrote:

I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality.


It's pretty predictable that that is all there will be to choose from in the near future...which some people do not want nor need a smartphone. I'm just thinking that it will be harder for the elderly and other older folks to advance and get used to.

:cathappy: Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010 :cathappy:



Remember that Wild Banchi... 1993-2010
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 17, 2011 10:50:29 PM
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Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 17, 2011 at 10:53:41 PM

Wild Banchi wrote:

Razr8 wrote:

I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality.


It's pretty predictable that that is all there will be to choose from in the near future...which some people do not want nor need a smartphone. I'm just thinking that it will be harder for the elderly and other older folks to advance and get used to.

 It will eventually come to smartphones as many old folks today know how to use smartphones, having used PC's themselves. Those who need a simple phone like Jitterbug, are the ones not exposed to PC while in their working years. They will eventually be outnumbered. I dare to predict that one day manufacturers will make only smartphones that can be configured to user needs. That day may not be anytime soon.


Wild Banchi wrote:

Razr8 wrote:

I suppose at some point I might have to upgrade to a smartphone like device, just as long as it has a solid build and solid call quality.


It's pretty predictable that that is all there will be to choose from in the near future...which some people do not want nor need a smartphone. I'm just thinking that it will be harder for the elderly and other older folks to advance and get used to.

 It will eventually come to smartphones as many old folks today know how to use smartphones, having used PC's themselves. Those who need a simple phone like Jitterbug, are the ones not exposed to PC while in their working years. They will eventually be outnumbered. I dare to predict that one day manufacturers will make only smartphones that can be configured to user needs. That day may not be anytime soon.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 18, 2011 12:24:22 AM
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Edited by jii on Jul 18, 2011 at 12:25:08 AM

Wild Banchi wrote
"which some people do not want nor need a smartphone"

The 14 year old girls at your local high school come to mind. Cracked me up when I was last at the local store on a saturday afternoon and saw that the entire joint was filled with high school kids asking Mommy and Daddy to buy them that shiny $400+ phone because all their friends have one.

 

My kid? He's getting a pager. If that.


Wild Banchi wrote
"which some people do not want nor need a smartphone"

The 14 year old girls at your local high school come to mind. Cracked me up when I was last at the local store on a saturday afternoon and saw that the entire joint was filled with high school kids asking Mommy and Daddy to buy them that shiny $400+ phone because all their friends have one.

 

My kid? He's getting a pager. If that.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 18, 2011 5:08:40 AM
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Razr8 wrote:

Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.


Smiley Very Happy  No - actually I can't provide nearly the insight that many of the old time members can.  Everything I know, I've gained from them. Smiley Happy



ilikewireless wrote:

Professor hme83, thanks for sharing your thoughts.

 

When I tried to compare phones, I can't quite put a finger on them. You have enlightened us by pointing out some of the pitfalls, like comparing apples to oranges.

 

I like flip phones because they are lightweight, small and have long talk time, based on my observation. Mine has 7.5 hrs talk time and it's about the smallest and lightest cell phone I can find to fit easily in my shirt pocket. I neither favor smartphones nor basic flip phones as they all have their uses, and their market share. I feel that many branded ones are designed to make money for carriers :lol:, especially smartphones :lol: On the serious side, I feel for consumers who were charged left and right for things that they did not know could happen to their phones, like background tasks running in smartphones.

 

As manufacturers put more features into flip phones, like GPS and user-friendly calculator, the line between flip phones and smartphones is becoming blurred, in the area of functionality.

 

In the end, you are right that it is one's wallet and one's uses for phones, that dictate one's choice.

 

 

 



Actually, I guess my point was more just that the carriers (IMHO) are steering their customers toward smartphones because they command the additional monthly revenue (for the carrier) of the required data plans (post paid service).  But many of the features that people associate with a "smartphone" are actually available on feature phones (and have been for quite some time) - they are just removed from the devices in the carriers' offerings.

 

I'm not especially partial to smartphones - my prefered style isn't the flip, it's a bar phone.  The couple of things I especially like about my Nokia smartphone (as opposed to my original 6820 - which is a 2004 non-smartphone with a unique horizontal fold out physical keyboard that ATTWS sold - fortunately, mine is non-branded though - lol) are the ability for copy/cut and paste and the fact that you can send/receive e-mail with attachments from the e-mail client.  If it weren't for my e-mail provider implementing security measures which the 6820 doesn't support, I would have never moved up to the E70 (Symbian).  And a non-branded, non-smartphone SE's e-mail client actually handles attachments and push e-mail.  (At&t removes SE's e-mail client and puts Mobile E-Mail on the phone instead - which of course at&t is now charging a $5/month subscription fee for the new version of the Mobile E-Mail client.)

 

My own personal opinion is that a smartphone is the way to go for someone who wants to make a lot of customizations to their device and/or someone who needs the security and/or "easy" syncing between a phone and computer that a smartphone o/s more readily provides.  Outside of that, there are probably a number of feature phones (non-branded) that could suit a user's needs just as well without carrying the need for the mandatory data plan (post paid service) and are generally easier to use.  But you won't find these phones at the carrier.

 

You are right about the lines between smartphones/feature phones becoming increasingly blurred - the advent of the original iPhone really was a change of tides, making smartphones much more user friendly.  At the same time however, there have always been very technically competent users and communities who could pretty much customize their Motos and SE feature phones in any way their heart desired.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


Razr8 wrote:

Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.


Smiley Very Happy  No - actually I can't provide nearly the insight that many of the old time members can.  Everything I know, I've gained from them. Smiley Happy



ilikewireless wrote:

Professor hme83, thanks for sharing your thoughts.

 

When I tried to compare phones, I can't quite put a finger on them. You have enlightened us by pointing out some of the pitfalls, like comparing apples to oranges.

 

I like flip phones because they are lightweight, small and have long talk time, based on my observation. Mine has 7.5 hrs talk time and it's about the smallest and lightest cell phone I can find to fit easily in my shirt pocket. I neither favor smartphones nor basic flip phones as they all have their uses, and their market share. I feel that many branded ones are designed to make money for carriers :lol:, especially smartphones :lol: On the serious side, I feel for consumers who were charged left and right for things that they did not know could happen to their phones, like background tasks running in smartphones.

 

As manufacturers put more features into flip phones, like GPS and user-friendly calculator, the line between flip phones and smartphones is becoming blurred, in the area of functionality.

 

In the end, you are right that it is one's wallet and one's uses for phones, that dictate one's choice.

 

 

 



Actually, I guess my point was more just that the carriers (IMHO) are steering their customers toward smartphones because they command the additional monthly revenue (for the carrier) of the required data plans (post paid service).  But many of the features that people associate with a "smartphone" are actually available on feature phones (and have been for quite some time) - they are just removed from the devices in the carriers' offerings.

 

I'm not especially partial to smartphones - my prefered style isn't the flip, it's a bar phone.  The couple of things I especially like about my Nokia smartphone (as opposed to my original 6820 - which is a 2004 non-smartphone with a unique horizontal fold out physical keyboard that ATTWS sold - fortunately, mine is non-branded though - lol) are the ability for copy/cut and paste and the fact that you can send/receive e-mail with attachments from the e-mail client.  If it weren't for my e-mail provider implementing security measures which the 6820 doesn't support, I would have never moved up to the E70 (Symbian).  And a non-branded, non-smartphone SE's e-mail client actually handles attachments and push e-mail.  (At&t removes SE's e-mail client and puts Mobile E-Mail on the phone instead - which of course at&t is now charging a $5/month subscription fee for the new version of the Mobile E-Mail client.)

 

My own personal opinion is that a smartphone is the way to go for someone who wants to make a lot of customizations to their device and/or someone who needs the security and/or "easy" syncing between a phone and computer that a smartphone o/s more readily provides.  Outside of that, there are probably a number of feature phones (non-branded) that could suit a user's needs just as well without carrying the need for the mandatory data plan (post paid service) and are generally easier to use.  But you won't find these phones at the carrier.

 

You are right about the lines between smartphones/feature phones becoming increasingly blurred - the advent of the original iPhone really was a change of tides, making smartphones much more user friendly.  At the same time however, there have always been very technically competent users and communities who could pretty much customize their Motos and SE feature phones in any way their heart desired.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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My main reason for a smartphone is for syncing my contacts and calendar.  Using Google, Yahoo, and my phone, I share contacts (stored on both Google and Yahoo) and Calendar (stored on my Office PC and Google) on my phone and 3 computers, wirelessly and automatically.  The shared calendar has saved me on several occasions.

My main reason for a smartphone is for syncing my contacts and calendar.  Using Google, Yahoo, and my phone, I share contacts (stored on both Google and Yahoo) and Calendar (stored on my Office PC and Google) on my phone and 3 computers, wirelessly and automatically.  The shared calendar has saved me on several occasions.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 20, 2011 at 8:53:33 AM

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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FredW wrote:

My main reason for a smartphone is for syncing my contacts and calendar.  Using Google, Yahoo, and my phone, I share contacts (stored on both Google and Yahoo) and Calendar (stored on my Office PC and Google) on my phone and 3 computers, wirelessly and automatically.  The shared calendar has saved me on several occasions.



Yep. It's the main reason for many too.


FredW wrote:

My main reason for a smartphone is for syncing my contacts and calendar.  Using Google, Yahoo, and my phone, I share contacts (stored on both Google and Yahoo) and Calendar (stored on my Office PC and Google) on my phone and 3 computers, wirelessly and automatically.  The shared calendar has saved me on several occasions.



Yep. It's the main reason for many too.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Wild Banchi wrote:
I don't know why, but I seem to prefer having a smartphone (without a data plan, of course Smiley Tongue) versus a regular flip phone. I've had two flip phones out of my six cell phones altogether and I can't say that I didn't like them. Neither of them were AT&T flip phones, but they were and still are incredibly easy to use.

The only thing that bothers me on flip phones is text messaging. It is so difficult to type every single little letter that you want using the keypad, pressing the same button multiple times sometimes. I would much rather just whip out my smartphone with a virtual keyboard and type away as fast I wanted, using the upwards keyboard or the sideways one - whichever one I feel like using. Other than that, they are solid, simple, and reliable - the way a cell phone should be.

I must be the type of person that likes all the bells and whistles... When I think about it, I can't see myself arguing with that. I have a passion for cell phones and as they advance every year, from the old Motorola DynaTAC to the Razr to today's top-of-the-line smartphones, you never know what they will be capable of accomplishing next to otherwise simplify our busy lives.


About early Motorola cell phones, I remember that they were really heavy like a couple of pounds due to the battery.

 

Maybe smartphones re-simplify our busy lives to counter the busy lives due to cell phone ownership, like being on a wireless leash.


Wild Banchi wrote:
I don't know why, but I seem to prefer having a smartphone (without a data plan, of course Smiley Tongue) versus a regular flip phone. I've had two flip phones out of my six cell phones altogether and I can't say that I didn't like them. Neither of them were AT&T flip phones, but they were and still are incredibly easy to use.

The only thing that bothers me on flip phones is text messaging. It is so difficult to type every single little letter that you want using the keypad, pressing the same button multiple times sometimes. I would much rather just whip out my smartphone with a virtual keyboard and type away as fast I wanted, using the upwards keyboard or the sideways one - whichever one I feel like using. Other than that, they are solid, simple, and reliable - the way a cell phone should be.

I must be the type of person that likes all the bells and whistles... When I think about it, I can't see myself arguing with that. I have a passion for cell phones and as they advance every year, from the old Motorola DynaTAC to the Razr to today's top-of-the-line smartphones, you never know what they will be capable of accomplishing next to otherwise simplify our busy lives.


About early Motorola cell phones, I remember that they were really heavy like a couple of pounds due to the battery.

 

Maybe smartphones re-simplify our busy lives to counter the busy lives due to cell phone ownership, like being on a wireless leash.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Razr8 wrote:

Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.


Razr8:
Sounds humorous.


Razr8 wrote:

Geez hme83, I can see why your a Professor, enlightening as alwaysSmiley Wink. But from I gather I think what likewireless meant was is that if your going to use a phone just as a phone then a smartphone might be overkill. But I guess it also comes down to personal choice and whatever works for you.


Razr8:
Sounds humorous.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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jii wrote:

Wild Banchi wrote
"which some people do not want nor need a smartphone"

The 14 year old girls at your local high school come to mind. Cracked me up when I was last at the local store on a saturday afternoon and saw that the entire joint was filled with high school kids asking Mommy and Daddy to buy them that shiny $400+ phone because all their friends have one.

 

My kid? He's getting a pager. If that.



That may work where public phone booths are still around. In my area, the good ole public phone booths are gone forever, except outside some grocery stores. Ah those are the good ole daysSmiley Wink I stopped using a cell phone for a couple of years until one day I discovered that all phone booths were removed from local shopping malls.


jii wrote:

Wild Banchi wrote
"which some people do not want nor need a smartphone"

The 14 year old girls at your local high school come to mind. Cracked me up when I was last at the local store on a saturday afternoon and saw that the entire joint was filled with high school kids asking Mommy and Daddy to buy them that shiny $400+ phone because all their friends have one.

 

My kid? He's getting a pager. If that.



That may work where public phone booths are still around. In my area, the good ole public phone booths are gone forever, except outside some grocery stores. Ah those are the good ole daysSmiley Wink I stopped using a cell phone for a couple of years until one day I discovered that all phone booths were removed from local shopping malls.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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ilikewireless wrote:

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 


lol.  I'm not really the best person to be able to provide any details; both of my SE's are at&t branded so the generic SE e-mail client was removed by at&t.  They are just "fun" phones - not what I use on a day to day basis, so it's never been important enough to me to debrand them.

 

I don't expect that something like MS Office files would be handled by a non-smartphone's e-mail client (but I really don't know).  If you need to use your phone for that type of thing, my guess is you are better off with a smartphone.  Sorry - my comments/thinking were oriented toward those who use their phones primarily for communication outside of "professional" productivity needs. Smiley Happy  My Nokia E70 handles both pdf and MS Office files, but I've only used them just to try them out.  I certainly wouldn't want to work on or review an Excel file from it.  lol.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


ilikewireless wrote:

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 


lol.  I'm not really the best person to be able to provide any details; both of my SE's are at&t branded so the generic SE e-mail client was removed by at&t.  They are just "fun" phones - not what I use on a day to day basis, so it's never been important enough to me to debrand them.

 

I don't expect that something like MS Office files would be handled by a non-smartphone's e-mail client (but I really don't know).  If you need to use your phone for that type of thing, my guess is you are better off with a smartphone.  Sorry - my comments/thinking were oriented toward those who use their phones primarily for communication outside of "professional" productivity needs. Smiley Happy  My Nokia E70 handles both pdf and MS Office files, but I've only used them just to try them out.  I certainly wouldn't want to work on or review an Excel file from it.  lol.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 21, 2011 at 3:08:51 PM

hme83 wrote:

ilikewireless wrote:

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 


lol.  I'm not really the best person to be able to provide any details; both of my SE's are at&t branded so the generic SE e-mail client was removed by at&t.  They are just "fun" phones - not what I use on a day to day basis, so it's never been important enough to me to debrand them.

 

I don't expect that something like MS Office files would be handled by a non-smartphone's e-mail client (but I really don't know).  If you need to use your phone for that type of thing, my guess is you are better off with a smartphone.  Sorry - my comments/thinking were oriented toward those who use their phones primarily for communication outside of "professional" productivity needs. Smiley Happy  My Nokia E70 handles both pdf and MS Office files, but I've only used them just to try them out.  I certainly wouldn't want to work on or review an Excel file from it.  lol.



I am basically getting to know more about cell phones after years of neglect in this area. I used to look the other way and pretended smartphones didn't exist, though I feel very much at home with computers.

 

With my Android tablet, I can read e-mails and MS Office file attachments, pdf, and other file formats I care about. So that would also apply to Android phones, as you mentioned already.

 

With smartphones, some things are compromised even though the functionality of whatever smartphones are trying to impersonate dedicated devices is on board. For example, while a smartphone software can provide Sports GPS function, it is a compromise for a wrist attached Sports GPS. Another compromise that is obvious is that smartphones have large batteries, making them bulky to carry in one's pockets. Yet another example is the use of smartphones as car navigation GPS. In this area, a car GPS like Tom Tom  and Garmin are better adapted for use in a car, due to for example, a placement issue that can affect reception of GPS signals. Other compromises are screen readability and the loudness of spoken directions.

 

However, it's not too bad if one accepts compromises in exchange for incidental use like you mentioned - most users would not have a car GPS with them at all times. So your use of the GPS in a phone is well worth it.

 

In summary, a smartphone is like a phone trying to be a jack of all trades. In some cases, carriers seem to have forgotten the most important function of a phone - being able to place/receive a call, due to networks being overloaded to the point of degrading the performance of the most important function - placing and receiving calls.

 

 


hme83 wrote:

ilikewireless wrote:

hme83,

 

I was under the impression that a potential problem area with e-mail on feature phones is viewing of attachment. I would like to know more about what file types are supported on your feature phones: pdf, and MS Office files in particular. I know that Android devices on FroYo or higher, can handle them all. It may be that a feature phone is an option for those who want e-mail with attachments.

 

 


lol.  I'm not really the best person to be able to provide any details; both of my SE's are at&t branded so the generic SE e-mail client was removed by at&t.  They are just "fun" phones - not what I use on a day to day basis, so it's never been important enough to me to debrand them.

 

I don't expect that something like MS Office files would be handled by a non-smartphone's e-mail client (but I really don't know).  If you need to use your phone for that type of thing, my guess is you are better off with a smartphone.  Sorry - my comments/thinking were oriented toward those who use their phones primarily for communication outside of "professional" productivity needs. Smiley Happy  My Nokia E70 handles both pdf and MS Office files, but I've only used them just to try them out.  I certainly wouldn't want to work on or review an Excel file from it.  lol.



I am basically getting to know more about cell phones after years of neglect in this area. I used to look the other way and pretended smartphones didn't exist, though I feel very much at home with computers.

 

With my Android tablet, I can read e-mails and MS Office file attachments, pdf, and other file formats I care about. So that would also apply to Android phones, as you mentioned already.

 

With smartphones, some things are compromised even though the functionality of whatever smartphones are trying to impersonate dedicated devices is on board. For example, while a smartphone software can provide Sports GPS function, it is a compromise for a wrist attached Sports GPS. Another compromise that is obvious is that smartphones have large batteries, making them bulky to carry in one's pockets. Yet another example is the use of smartphones as car navigation GPS. In this area, a car GPS like Tom Tom  and Garmin are better adapted for use in a car, due to for example, a placement issue that can affect reception of GPS signals. Other compromises are screen readability and the loudness of spoken directions.

 

However, it's not too bad if one accepts compromises in exchange for incidental use like you mentioned - most users would not have a car GPS with them at all times. So your use of the GPS in a phone is well worth it.

 

In summary, a smartphone is like a phone trying to be a jack of all trades. In some cases, carriers seem to have forgotten the most important function of a phone - being able to place/receive a call, due to networks being overloaded to the point of degrading the performance of the most important function - placing and receiving calls.

 

 

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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ilikewireless wrote:
I am basically getting to know more about cell phones after years of neglect in this area. I used to look the other way and pretended smartphones didn't exist, though I feel very much at home with computers.

 

With my Android tablet, I can read e-mails and MS Office file attachments, pdf, and other file formats I care about. So that would also apply to Android phones, as you mentioned already.

 

With smartphones, some things are compromised even though the functionality of whatever smartphones are trying to impersonate dedicated devices is on board. For example, while a smartphone software can provide Sports GPS function, it is a compromise for a wrist attached Sports GPS. Another compromise that is obvious is that smartphones have large batteries, making them bulky to carry in one's pockets. Yet another example is the use of smartphones as car navigation GPS. In this area, a car GPS like Tom Tom  and Garmin are better adapted for use in a car, due to for example, a placement issue that can affect reception of GPS signals. Other compromises are screen readability and the loudness of spoken directions.

 

However, it's not too bad if one accepts compromises in exchange for incidental use like you mentioned - most users would not have a car GPS with them at all times. So your use of the GPS in a phone is well worth it.

 

In summary, a smartphone is like a phone trying to be a jack of all trades. In some cases, carriers seem to have forgotten the most important function of a phone - being able to place/receive a call, due to networks being overloaded to the point of degrading the performance of the most important function - placing and receiving calls.

 

 


Agreed - the converged devices are never going to be as competent as an individual device that is oriented toward specific functionality is. Smiley Happy  But like you said, if you can accept their inherent limitations they can definitely provide the basic functionality in a more portable package.

 

I purchased my W518a for it's GPS functionality primarily to use while day hiking, etc., so the fact that it is combined with a phone is of benefit - just in case there is an emergency of some type.  The W580i, I purchased primarily for it's pedometer/fitness function - the fact that it is also my MP3 player and provides phone functionality (if needed for emergencies) is beneficial.

 

I have an 8" netbook for browsing and/or doing "light" work that is a breeze for traveling, so I don't need a phone that is able to do those things in what I find to be a very uncomfortable format to use for anything other than just for quick "look-ups".  But I don't use my cell phone for work, so I don't need the syncing ability for contacts/calendar information - as my personal life isn't that complex either.  lol.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


ilikewireless wrote:
I am basically getting to know more about cell phones after years of neglect in this area. I used to look the other way and pretended smartphones didn't exist, though I feel very much at home with computers.

 

With my Android tablet, I can read e-mails and MS Office file attachments, pdf, and other file formats I care about. So that would also apply to Android phones, as you mentioned already.

 

With smartphones, some things are compromised even though the functionality of whatever smartphones are trying to impersonate dedicated devices is on board. For example, while a smartphone software can provide Sports GPS function, it is a compromise for a wrist attached Sports GPS. Another compromise that is obvious is that smartphones have large batteries, making them bulky to carry in one's pockets. Yet another example is the use of smartphones as car navigation GPS. In this area, a car GPS like Tom Tom  and Garmin are better adapted for use in a car, due to for example, a placement issue that can affect reception of GPS signals. Other compromises are screen readability and the loudness of spoken directions.

 

However, it's not too bad if one accepts compromises in exchange for incidental use like you mentioned - most users would not have a car GPS with them at all times. So your use of the GPS in a phone is well worth it.

 

In summary, a smartphone is like a phone trying to be a jack of all trades. In some cases, carriers seem to have forgotten the most important function of a phone - being able to place/receive a call, due to networks being overloaded to the point of degrading the performance of the most important function - placing and receiving calls.

 

 


Agreed - the converged devices are never going to be as competent as an individual device that is oriented toward specific functionality is. Smiley Happy  But like you said, if you can accept their inherent limitations they can definitely provide the basic functionality in a more portable package.

 

I purchased my W518a for it's GPS functionality primarily to use while day hiking, etc., so the fact that it is combined with a phone is of benefit - just in case there is an emergency of some type.  The W580i, I purchased primarily for it's pedometer/fitness function - the fact that it is also my MP3 player and provides phone functionality (if needed for emergencies) is beneficial.

 

I have an 8" netbook for browsing and/or doing "light" work that is a breeze for traveling, so I don't need a phone that is able to do those things in what I find to be a very uncomfortable format to use for anything other than just for quick "look-ups".  But I don't use my cell phone for work, so I don't need the syncing ability for contacts/calendar information - as my personal life isn't that complex either.  lol.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Ilikewireless, I'm on board with your summary about a phone is meant to be just that, a phone. Strong signal and call quality is one of the reasons I chose my phone, although some of the other things it does is still pretty cool. Whenever anyone has shown me their smartphone I think to myself that's nice and all but it's more than I need.Tthat being said I was in an AT&T store the other day and the Atrix 4G is looking mighty tempting Smiley Very Happy

Ilikewireless, I'm on board with your summary about a phone is meant to be just that, a phone. Strong signal and call quality is one of the reasons I chose my phone, although some of the other things it does is still pretty cool. Whenever anyone has shown me their smartphone I think to myself that's nice and all but it's more than I need.Tthat being said I was in an AT&T store the other day and the Atrix 4G is looking mighty tempting Smiley Very Happy

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Hme83, you mentioned you use your W518a for day hiking, is that the phone that is postpaid? I ask because of the more complete coverage postpaid offers. When she was 6 years old my daughter and I use to do a little day hiking, it was fun. Smiley Wink

Hme83, you mentioned you use your W518a for day hiking, is that the phone that is postpaid? I ask because of the more complete coverage postpaid offers. When she was 6 years old my daughter and I use to do a little day hiking, it was fun. Smiley Wink

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Razr8 wrote:

Hme83, you mentioned you use your W518a for day hiking, is that the phone that is postpaid? I ask because of the more complete coverage postpaid offers. When she was 6 years old my daughter and I use to do a little day hiking, it was fun. Smiley Wink


I switch my SIMs between the W518a and the Nokia E70 routinely. Smiley Happy  Just depending on what my needs are at the time. 

 

I use the W518a for it's GPS (primarily) and that does require it having the post paid SIM in it, as to my knowledge Navigator isn't available for the prepaid plans; plus as you suggest, with prepaid service in my area the coverage really isn't there when you get very far from the major metropolitan areas and interstates.

 

The Nokia has a physical keyboard, and my primary use of my phone is not as a phone.  (lol.  I rarely make a call.)  It's to stay in touch with friends via e-mail.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


Razr8 wrote:

Hme83, you mentioned you use your W518a for day hiking, is that the phone that is postpaid? I ask because of the more complete coverage postpaid offers. When she was 6 years old my daughter and I use to do a little day hiking, it was fun. Smiley Wink


I switch my SIMs between the W518a and the Nokia E70 routinely. Smiley Happy  Just depending on what my needs are at the time. 

 

I use the W518a for it's GPS (primarily) and that does require it having the post paid SIM in it, as to my knowledge Navigator isn't available for the prepaid plans; plus as you suggest, with prepaid service in my area the coverage really isn't there when you get very far from the major metropolitan areas and interstates.

 

The Nokia has a physical keyboard, and my primary use of my phone is not as a phone.  (lol.  I rarely make a call.)  It's to stay in touch with friends via e-mail.

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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I see, thanks for responding. BTW, I think Tom Cruise used a Nokia phone similar to yours in the movie Collateral. Also, although I am on a prepaid plan Navigator is available to me if I paid the monthly $10 or the daily $3 fee.

I see, thanks for responding. BTW, I think Tom Cruise used a Nokia phone similar to yours in the movie Collateral. Also, although I am on a prepaid plan Navigator is available to me if I paid the monthly $10 or the daily $3 fee.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Professor
Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 23, 2011 at 10:04:01 AM

I read on a T-Mobile forum that a guy used GPS on a Nokia 5230 without a cellular connection. With that, he needed to download the latest map, pre-save the map, and use the saved map for navigation. One can download maps on a PC then transfer them to a Nokia smartphone, or simply use WiFi to download to a higher Nokia series (no wifi on 5230). The catch is Nokia Ovi Map subscription (Euro 9.99/yr) - not bad compared to AT&T Navigator. I think the AT&T subscription includes busy traffic routing feature. The GPS operation modes are, from the GPS section of the Nokia manual:

 

Integrated GPS — Use the integrated GPS receiver of your device.

 

Assisted GPS — Use Assisted GPS (A-GPS) to receive assistance data from an

assistance data server.

 

Bluetooth GPS — Use a compatible external GPS receiver with Bluetooth

connectivity.

 

Network based — Use information from the cellular network (network service).

I read on a T-Mobile forum that a guy used GPS on a Nokia 5230 without a cellular connection. With that, he needed to download the latest map, pre-save the map, and use the saved map for navigation. One can download maps on a PC then transfer them to a Nokia smartphone, or simply use WiFi to download to a higher Nokia series (no wifi on 5230). The catch is Nokia Ovi Map subscription (Euro 9.99/yr) - not bad compared to AT&T Navigator. I think the AT&T subscription includes busy traffic routing feature. The GPS operation modes are, from the GPS section of the Nokia manual:

 

Integrated GPS — Use the integrated GPS receiver of your device.

 

Assisted GPS — Use Assisted GPS (A-GPS) to receive assistance data from an

assistance data server.

 

Bluetooth GPS — Use a compatible external GPS receiver with Bluetooth

connectivity.

 

Network based — Use information from the cellular network (network service).

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 25, 2011 5:26:58 AM
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ACE - Master

Razr8 wrote:

I see, thanks for responding. BTW, I think Tom Cruise used a Nokia phone similar to yours in the movie Collateral. Also, although I am on a prepaid plan Navigator is available to me if I paid the monthly $10 or the daily $3 fee.


Thanks for letting me know - I didn't realize it was available with prepaid service, although the lack of consistent prepaid coverage here would still not make it very useful for my needs.  And I'm effectively paying only $5/month for it on my post paid plan as I have the $20/month unlimited data and Navigator package.  (I have no need for unlimited messaging so unlimited data alone costs me $15/month.)

 

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson


Razr8 wrote:

I see, thanks for responding. BTW, I think Tom Cruise used a Nokia phone similar to yours in the movie Collateral. Also, although I am on a prepaid plan Navigator is available to me if I paid the monthly $10 or the daily $3 fee.


Thanks for letting me know - I didn't realize it was available with prepaid service, although the lack of consistent prepaid coverage here would still not make it very useful for my needs.  And I'm effectively paying only $5/month for it on my post paid plan as I have the $20/month unlimited data and Navigator package.  (I have no need for unlimited messaging so unlimited data alone costs me $15/month.)

 

                                                                                                                         =^..^=
There must be a happy medium somewhere between being totally informed and blissfully unaware.

     - Doug Larson

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 25, 2011 8:17:04 AM
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Guru

I think we are making Ilikewireless' point, that those of us with non smartphones are getting by just fine.

I think we are making Ilikewireless' point, that those of us with non smartphones are getting by just fine.

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 26, 2011 8:48:16 AM
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Professor
Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 26, 2011 at 9:25:57 AM

Razr8 wrote:

I think we are making Ilikewireless' point, that those of us with non smartphones are getting by just fine.



Yep. I'm getting by just fine with a simple flip phone Smiley Happyand a Wifi only tablet.

 

An alternative is to use a no data plan prepaid smartphone with Wifi. A voice plan (not a mistyping) is required as spelled out in the TOS. I think the TOS is such that it does not allow one to use a smartphone solely as a mini-tablet. However, with a voice plan, one can use a prepaid smartphone as a mini-tablet.

 

I have compared a Samsung Galaxy Tab with a Samsung S smartphone, an Android smartphone, and I can tell that a smartphone is functionally quite the same in many areas or better, with the obvious difference in screen size. The 3G radio gives a smartphone an edge when it comes to A-GPS Navigation with Google Map display.

 

With a Samsung WiFi only tablet, maps are not displayed unless you preload the map first before you start a journey and keep the tablet ON at all times to preserve the map display. It seems that Nokia gets around the A-GPS issue by providing a native Integrated GPS, with capability to save a map (Android FroYo version does not save map on microSD drive). I hope future versions of Android tablets would include a native GPS so that one can use GPS where there's no cell radio and no WiFi coverage.

 


Razr8 wrote:

I think we are making Ilikewireless' point, that those of us with non smartphones are getting by just fine.



Yep. I'm getting by just fine with a simple flip phone Smiley Happyand a Wifi only tablet.

 

An alternative is to use a no data plan prepaid smartphone with Wifi. A voice plan (not a mistyping) is required as spelled out in the TOS. I think the TOS is such that it does not allow one to use a smartphone solely as a mini-tablet. However, with a voice plan, one can use a prepaid smartphone as a mini-tablet.

 

I have compared a Samsung Galaxy Tab with a Samsung S smartphone, an Android smartphone, and I can tell that a smartphone is functionally quite the same in many areas or better, with the obvious difference in screen size. The 3G radio gives a smartphone an edge when it comes to A-GPS Navigation with Google Map display.

 

With a Samsung WiFi only tablet, maps are not displayed unless you preload the map first before you start a journey and keep the tablet ON at all times to preserve the map display. It seems that Nokia gets around the A-GPS issue by providing a native Integrated GPS, with capability to save a map (Android FroYo version does not save map on microSD drive). I hope future versions of Android tablets would include a native GPS so that one can use GPS where there's no cell radio and no WiFi coverage.

 

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 26, 2011 4:49:19 PM
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Guru

Considering some of the points you made about comparing tablets and smartphones if the right smartphone came along would you make the switch?

Considering some of the points you made about comparing tablets and smartphones if the right smartphone came along would you make the switch?

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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Jul 26, 2011 5:52:00 PM
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Professor
Edited by ilikewireless on Jul 26, 2011 at 6:05:50 PM

Razr8 wrote:

Considering some of the points you made about comparing tablets and smartphones if the right smartphone came along would you make the switch?



Yes. I will make the switch if it's an Android smartphone with a built-in self-sufficient GPS like Nokia smartphones. On the other hand, an iPod touch with a Tom Tom GPS add-on that snaps together would probably do the trick except that I could not use Google's My Track as far as I know. Apple wants everything to themselves. So I'm back to looking for Android smartphones only.

 

One day there could be an Android with initial setup function to allow one to pick and choose features. Many Linux OS distributions include an initial installation setup that allows users to choose what they want to use. But then I keep my fingers crossed because it makes smartphones 10 times more complex, though more customised.

 

I have researched this to death. :LOL:


Razr8 wrote:

Considering some of the points you made about comparing tablets and smartphones if the right smartphone came along would you make the switch?



Yes. I will make the switch if it's an Android smartphone with a built-in self-sufficient GPS like Nokia smartphones. On the other hand, an iPod touch with a Tom Tom GPS add-on that snaps together would probably do the trick except that I could not use Google's My Track as far as I know. Apple wants everything to themselves. So I'm back to looking for Android smartphones only.

 

One day there could be an Android with initial setup function to allow one to pick and choose features. Many Linux OS distributions include an initial installation setup that allows users to choose what they want to use. But then I keep my fingers crossed because it makes smartphones 10 times more complex, though more customised.

 

I have researched this to death. :LOL:

Re: Pros and cons of using a smartphone when a basic flip phone will work.

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