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Posted Oct 14, 2010
2:30:22 PM
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I give up
Edited by dontcarenmore on Oct 14, 2010 at 4:38:14 PM

I was going to mail this letter to AT&T, but I give up trying to find an address on this site, so I'm just going to post it here and have done with it.

 

 

Dear AT&T,

 

  My family has been on the AT&T family plan for over 12 years, however, in the last two weeks, we have decided to seek out a new carrier.  I am writing you this letter to explain why.

 

  My iPhone was stolen on October 5th, 2010 and a police report filed.  We immediately put a hold on the phone number.  During the events that followed, I learned several things that would improve your customer service policy, outlined below.

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 

2)    T-Mobile provides me much better service coverage than AT&T.  I learned this because a friend lent me a Virgin Mobile “pay as you go” phone so that I could make calls regarding the theft of my phone (and other personal items).  Basically, AT&T forced me to pay money to their competitors.

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily keep old model phones on hand for customers in cases of emergencies.  The phones could be leant for a grace period of 30 days, with an outrageous fee attached if the phone was not returned within that 30 day period.  (Instead of repeatedly attempting to get me to purchase and iPhone 4 when my wallet has just been stolen.)

 

3)    Most of my friends have Verizon.  They cite Verizon’s excellent customer service as their reason for choosing Verizon over AT&T.  As I am sure AT&T is aware, in today’s hyper-advertised world, word-of-mouth recommendations are becoming more an more valued by consumers like myself. 

A Ready Solution: In the case of problems, train employees to say ‘I’m sorry to hear that.’  Studies suggest that the most likely targets  [Per Guidelines: Keep it Relevant and Appropriate] are persons who project arrogance or come across as uncaring, as AT&T representatives have come across to me over the past two weeks.  For instance, your company might look at how Allstate trains their customer service representatives, since a recent experience with them causes me to suspect that they are implementing this new research into their employee training.

 

In summation: through this frustrating experience, I have learned that I can receive better services from companies other than AT&T.   I therefore have nothing to gain from staying with AT&T and every reason to leave. 

 

Sincerely,

S.C.

I was going to mail this letter to AT&T, but I give up trying to find an address on this site, so I'm just going to post it here and have done with it.

 

 

Dear AT&T,

 

  My family has been on the AT&T family plan for over 12 years, however, in the last two weeks, we have decided to seek out a new carrier.  I am writing you this letter to explain why.

 

  My iPhone was stolen on October 5th, 2010 and a police report filed.  We immediately put a hold on the phone number.  During the events that followed, I learned several things that would improve your customer service policy, outlined below.

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 

2)    T-Mobile provides me much better service coverage than AT&T.  I learned this because a friend lent me a Virgin Mobile “pay as you go” phone so that I could make calls regarding the theft of my phone (and other personal items).  Basically, AT&T forced me to pay money to their competitors.

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily keep old model phones on hand for customers in cases of emergencies.  The phones could be leant for a grace period of 30 days, with an outrageous fee attached if the phone was not returned within that 30 day period.  (Instead of repeatedly attempting to get me to purchase and iPhone 4 when my wallet has just been stolen.)

 

3)    Most of my friends have Verizon.  They cite Verizon’s excellent customer service as their reason for choosing Verizon over AT&T.  As I am sure AT&T is aware, in today’s hyper-advertised world, word-of-mouth recommendations are becoming more an more valued by consumers like myself. 

A Ready Solution: In the case of problems, train employees to say ‘I’m sorry to hear that.’  Studies suggest that the most likely targets  [Per Guidelines: Keep it Relevant and Appropriate] are persons who project arrogance or come across as uncaring, as AT&T representatives have come across to me over the past two weeks.  For instance, your company might look at how Allstate trains their customer service representatives, since a recent experience with them causes me to suspect that they are implementing this new research into their employee training.

 

In summation: through this frustrating experience, I have learned that I can receive better services from companies other than AT&T.   I therefore have nothing to gain from staying with AT&T and every reason to leave. 

 

Sincerely,

S.C.

I give up

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Oct 14, 2010 2:40:54 PM
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Edited by UNSC_REACH on Oct 14, 2010 at 2:43:43 PM

SC, sorry to hear that. I've got a couple of things to address with your post though.

 

  1. ATT does not provide location services for lost phones. Anybody would then go accusing of other people in the general area of taking their phone. Leave it up to the police. ATT does offer a location service for helping you locate loved ones via their phones, but again comes with no guarantee and also is not meant for location lost or stolen phones. It does come with a 30 day trial if I'm not mistaken.
  2. ATT offers phones for as little as $30 with no contract at most corporate stores. These phones are simple and you can use them for calling. You can return them if you don't like them as well.
  3. ATT customer care reps are supposed to say "I'm sorry to hear that" and will be docked quality if they do not. Also its just common courtesy.

So I'm sorry if your experience wasn't the best, but I hope some of the things I've discussed address things in your original post. I hope everything works out for the best. Lastly, keep in mind this is a customer based forum so you may not get ATT official response from this post. That being said, I am a long time customer such as yourself and my post is just my opinion.

SC, sorry to hear that. I've got a couple of things to address with your post though.

 

  1. ATT does not provide location services for lost phones. Anybody would then go accusing of other people in the general area of taking their phone. Leave it up to the police. ATT does offer a location service for helping you locate loved ones via their phones, but again comes with no guarantee and also is not meant for location lost or stolen phones. It does come with a 30 day trial if I'm not mistaken.
  2. ATT offers phones for as little as $30 with no contract at most corporate stores. These phones are simple and you can use them for calling. You can return them if you don't like them as well.
  3. ATT customer care reps are supposed to say "I'm sorry to hear that" and will be docked quality if they do not. Also its just common courtesy.

So I'm sorry if your experience wasn't the best, but I hope some of the things I've discussed address things in your original post. I hope everything works out for the best. Lastly, keep in mind this is a customer based forum so you may not get ATT official response from this post. That being said, I am a long time customer such as yourself and my post is just my opinion.

Re: I give up

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Oct 14, 2010 4:34:36 PM
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I am sorry to hear your phone was stolen.  USNC_REACH gave a good reply, but there are a couple of things I'd like to expand on.  As always, I'm here as a fellow customer.  This is a customer forum, and you're unlikely to get an official response from AT&T through this forum.

 

1. I doubt that any carrier would give an end user information to locate a stolen phone, and there are very good reasons for that.  If a rep offered to sign you up for a service like Family Map, the rep may only have wanted to be helpful, but that really is a mis-use of the service.  When you've had property stolen, it should be handled by the proper authorities.  It's not your job to track the property down, and I don't think any carrier is going to encourage vigilantism.

 

We live in a society where people can sue because hot coffee is hot.  Think about what might happen if a carrier did release the information you want to the end user.  Imagine two people named Thief and Victim.  Victim has phone service with a company named Carrier, Inc.  After years of being teased about his name, Thief steals Victim's phone.  Victim calls Carrier, reporting the theft.  Carrier responds by telling Victim that the phone is currently at the intersection of This Street and That Lane, so Victim promptly heads to that intersection. Victim finds Thief, confronts Thief about the stolen phone, and beats Thief up.  Thief presses assault charges against Victim, and Thief sues Carrier for encouraging the assault.  Thief makes a lot of money, Carrier faces lawsuit, and Victim is prosecuted as a criminal.  Not a happy ending.

 

Alternately, imagine either the location data was a block or so off, or Thief has moved by the time Victim arrives.  The only person near the intersection is Bystander.  Victim approaches Bystander, accusing her of stealing his phone.  Things get violent.  Ultimately, Bystander gets some serious injuries, Victim gets charged with battery, and both sue Carrier for giving the information.  Meanwhile, Thief has sold the stolen phone with impunity by the time the authorities get involved, and nobody ever knows he was involved.  In the end, Bystander gets beaten up for no reason, Victim is still prosecuted as a criminal, Carrier still faces lawsuit, and Thief still makes money.

 

There's just no way a carrier would take that risk.  The carrier is not a law enforcement agency, and neither are you.

 

2. As stated above, you can a get very low-cost no contract phone to use temporarily.  In fact, you don't need to spend $30 if you can wait a bit for shipping.  There are prepaid phones for as little as $8 available online.  The great thing about that option is that you can choose to return the phone within 30 days, but you can also choose to keep it with no added fees.  It's yours, and you can use it as a backup for future emergencies.

 

0. AT&T does provide contact information.  From the Contact Us page:


By Phone

Customer Service

1-800-331-0500 or 611 from your wireless phone


Hearing Impaired

1-866-241-6567 (TTY)  

 

 

By Email*

Log in to Email Us.

*Not available to GoPhone® customers


 

 

 


I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s positions, strategies or opinions.

 

I am sorry to hear your phone was stolen.  USNC_REACH gave a good reply, but there are a couple of things I'd like to expand on.  As always, I'm here as a fellow customer.  This is a customer forum, and you're unlikely to get an official response from AT&T through this forum.

 

1. I doubt that any carrier would give an end user information to locate a stolen phone, and there are very good reasons for that.  If a rep offered to sign you up for a service like Family Map, the rep may only have wanted to be helpful, but that really is a mis-use of the service.  When you've had property stolen, it should be handled by the proper authorities.  It's not your job to track the property down, and I don't think any carrier is going to encourage vigilantism.

 

We live in a society where people can sue because hot coffee is hot.  Think about what might happen if a carrier did release the information you want to the end user.  Imagine two people named Thief and Victim.  Victim has phone service with a company named Carrier, Inc.  After years of being teased about his name, Thief steals Victim's phone.  Victim calls Carrier, reporting the theft.  Carrier responds by telling Victim that the phone is currently at the intersection of This Street and That Lane, so Victim promptly heads to that intersection. Victim finds Thief, confronts Thief about the stolen phone, and beats Thief up.  Thief presses assault charges against Victim, and Thief sues Carrier for encouraging the assault.  Thief makes a lot of money, Carrier faces lawsuit, and Victim is prosecuted as a criminal.  Not a happy ending.

 

Alternately, imagine either the location data was a block or so off, or Thief has moved by the time Victim arrives.  The only person near the intersection is Bystander.  Victim approaches Bystander, accusing her of stealing his phone.  Things get violent.  Ultimately, Bystander gets some serious injuries, Victim gets charged with battery, and both sue Carrier for giving the information.  Meanwhile, Thief has sold the stolen phone with impunity by the time the authorities get involved, and nobody ever knows he was involved.  In the end, Bystander gets beaten up for no reason, Victim is still prosecuted as a criminal, Carrier still faces lawsuit, and Thief still makes money.

 

There's just no way a carrier would take that risk.  The carrier is not a law enforcement agency, and neither are you.

 

2. As stated above, you can a get very low-cost no contract phone to use temporarily.  In fact, you don't need to spend $30 if you can wait a bit for shipping.  There are prepaid phones for as little as $8 available online.  The great thing about that option is that you can choose to return the phone within 30 days, but you can also choose to keep it with no added fees.  It's yours, and you can use it as a backup for future emergencies.

 

0. AT&T does provide contact information.  From the Contact Us page:


By Phone

Customer Service

1-800-331-0500 or 611 from your wireless phone


Hearing Impaired

1-866-241-6567 (TTY)  

 

 

By Email*

Log in to Email Us.

*Not available to GoPhone® customers


 

 

Re: I give up

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Oct 14, 2010 5:36:46 PM
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Edited by Zombiehunter on Oct 14, 2010 at 5:43:10 PM

 


erichamion wrote:

 

I am sorry to hear your phone was stolen.  USNC_REACH gave a good reply, but there are a couple of things I'd like to expand on.  As always, I'm here as a fellow customer.  This is a customer forum, and you're unlikely to get an official response from AT&T through this forum.

 

1. I doubt that any carrier would give an end user information to locate a stolen phone, and there are very good reasons for that.  If a rep offered to sign you up for a service like Family Map, the rep may only have wanted to be helpful, but that really is a mis-use of the service.  When you've had property stolen, it should be handled by the proper authorities.  It's not your job to track the property down, and I don't think any carrier is going to encourage vigilantism.

 

We live in a society where people can sue because hot coffee is hot.  Think about what might happen if a carrier did release the information you want to the end user.

 

There's just no way a carrier would take that risk.  The carrier is not a law enforcement agency, and neither are you.

 


Outstanding analogy as to why things are done the way they are today.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Zombie Hunter Mission Statement

Exterminate the living dead and keep our fellow citizens alive and safe. We will be connecting with our fellow businesses, the police department, funeral home, and weapon manufacturers to help map out, and exterminate the pesky living dead from our community.

~~~Seth Mendenhall

 


erichamion wrote:

 

I am sorry to hear your phone was stolen.  USNC_REACH gave a good reply, but there are a couple of things I'd like to expand on.  As always, I'm here as a fellow customer.  This is a customer forum, and you're unlikely to get an official response from AT&T through this forum.

 

1. I doubt that any carrier would give an end user information to locate a stolen phone, and there are very good reasons for that.  If a rep offered to sign you up for a service like Family Map, the rep may only have wanted to be helpful, but that really is a mis-use of the service.  When you've had property stolen, it should be handled by the proper authorities.  It's not your job to track the property down, and I don't think any carrier is going to encourage vigilantism.

 

We live in a society where people can sue because hot coffee is hot.  Think about what might happen if a carrier did release the information you want to the end user.

 

There's just no way a carrier would take that risk.  The carrier is not a law enforcement agency, and neither are you.

 


Outstanding analogy as to why things are done the way they are today.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Zombie Hunter Mission Statement

Exterminate the living dead and keep our fellow citizens alive and safe. We will be connecting with our fellow businesses, the police department, funeral home, and weapon manufacturers to help map out, and exterminate the pesky living dead from our community.

~~~Seth Mendenhall

Re: I give up

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Oct 14, 2010 7:36:15 PM
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Edited by Waterlily29 on Oct 14, 2010 at 7:40:23 PM
To UNSC_REACH and erichamion...

It is the best reply yet that I have seen on this site from a well informed and willing to help AT&T customer!! Kudos!!Smiley Happy

To UNSC_REACH and erichamion...

It is the best reply yet that I have seen on this site from a well informed and willing to help AT&T customer!! Kudos!!Smiley Happy

Re: I give up

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Oct 15, 2010 7:20:16 AM
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Edited by UNSC_REACH on Oct 15, 2010 at 7:20:42 AM

Thanks for the support. Also, to erichamion: one of the best reply's I've read here ever. Kudos! Thanks for spelling it out further.

Thanks for the support. Also, to erichamion: one of the best reply's I've read here ever. Kudos! Thanks for spelling it out further.

Re: I give up

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Oct 15, 2010 8:13:53 AM
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He's not going to read this since he "dontcarenmore", but I have a few questions...

 

1) Why would you want to be the one to find the criminal and not let the authorities handle it? Personally, I wouldn't want to be standing there when the cops catch him/her; I want to be far away as safe as possible, upset or not. Granted authorities don't always get the job done, but you have to let them do their job.

 

2) I haven't heard of a company that would lend cellphones out. There are cheap enough cellphones you can buy out of contract that you can use. Even if you were a customer for your whole life. And what does "better service coverage" mean? Your explanation doesn't support that statement. You only said that a friend lent you a phone but another one of your friends could have been on AT&T and lent you their AT&T phone. This would have achieved the same outcome. Please clarify. And a better solution would be that if you have a valid police report for a stolen phone, is to offer you a phone for the discounted price, as if you were upgrading or a new subscriber. That way, you wouldn't have to fork over the full bill of the phone. This would be a much better solution, in my opinion.

 

3) That's great that all your friends have Verizon and have all complimented their customer service, so did my parents and friends. But did you hear the flipside to that? My parents had to call Verizon's CS almost every single month to have their bill corrected. Sure, their CS were exceptionally friendly, but it was their mistake in the first place. My parents eventually got so upset at Verizon that they switched to AT&T. Never had billing issues again. And no, this isn't an isolated incident as this happened to my aunt as well as several co-workers. They all jumped to other carriers. Every company has their good and bad parts. NO company is without faults.

 

I know you were upset but the only point you have that's valid is the first point but erichamion already laid a great explanation. The other two points you have were probably made when you were, and probably still are, upset at AT&T as a company. But don't get me wrong, I'm in no way discounting your frustration or situation...

He's not going to read this since he "dontcarenmore", but I have a few questions...

 

1) Why would you want to be the one to find the criminal and not let the authorities handle it? Personally, I wouldn't want to be standing there when the cops catch him/her; I want to be far away as safe as possible, upset or not. Granted authorities don't always get the job done, but you have to let them do their job.

 

2) I haven't heard of a company that would lend cellphones out. There are cheap enough cellphones you can buy out of contract that you can use. Even if you were a customer for your whole life. And what does "better service coverage" mean? Your explanation doesn't support that statement. You only said that a friend lent you a phone but another one of your friends could have been on AT&T and lent you their AT&T phone. This would have achieved the same outcome. Please clarify. And a better solution would be that if you have a valid police report for a stolen phone, is to offer you a phone for the discounted price, as if you were upgrading or a new subscriber. That way, you wouldn't have to fork over the full bill of the phone. This would be a much better solution, in my opinion.

 

3) That's great that all your friends have Verizon and have all complimented their customer service, so did my parents and friends. But did you hear the flipside to that? My parents had to call Verizon's CS almost every single month to have their bill corrected. Sure, their CS were exceptionally friendly, but it was their mistake in the first place. My parents eventually got so upset at Verizon that they switched to AT&T. Never had billing issues again. And no, this isn't an isolated incident as this happened to my aunt as well as several co-workers. They all jumped to other carriers. Every company has their good and bad parts. NO company is without faults.

 

I know you were upset but the only point you have that's valid is the first point but erichamion already laid a great explanation. The other two points you have were probably made when you were, and probably still are, upset at AT&T as a company. But don't get me wrong, I'm in no way discounting your frustration or situation...

Re: I give up

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Oct 16, 2010 11:17:57 AM
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AT&T doesn't locate phones, period, unless they do so in conjunction with law enforcement agencies.  Apple offers the MobileMe service, which includes the Find My iPhone feature, and AT&T also sells the Family Map service that works on iPhones and other types of phones.  And I'm sure the end user licensing agreements for both services indicate that a customer should NEVER attempt to get a phone back from criminals.  We have a criminal justice system for this very reason.  Let the system do its job.

 

 


dontcarenmore wrote:

I was going to mail this letter to AT&T, but I give up trying to find an address on this site, so I'm just going to post it here and have done with it.

 

 

Dear AT&T,

 

  My family has been on the AT&T family plan for over 12 years, however, in the last two weeks, we have decided to seek out a new carrier.  I am writing you this letter to explain why.

 

  My iPhone was stolen on October 5th, 2010 and a police report filed.  We immediately put a hold on the phone number.  During the events that followed, I learned several things that would improve your customer service policy, outlined below.

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 


 

AT&T doesn't locate phones, period, unless they do so in conjunction with law enforcement agencies.  Apple offers the MobileMe service, which includes the Find My iPhone feature, and AT&T also sells the Family Map service that works on iPhones and other types of phones.  And I'm sure the end user licensing agreements for both services indicate that a customer should NEVER attempt to get a phone back from criminals.  We have a criminal justice system for this very reason.  Let the system do its job.

 

 


dontcarenmore wrote:

I was going to mail this letter to AT&T, but I give up trying to find an address on this site, so I'm just going to post it here and have done with it.

 

 

Dear AT&T,

 

  My family has been on the AT&T family plan for over 12 years, however, in the last two weeks, we have decided to seek out a new carrier.  I am writing you this letter to explain why.

 

  My iPhone was stolen on October 5th, 2010 and a police report filed.  We immediately put a hold on the phone number.  During the events that followed, I learned several things that would improve your customer service policy, outlined below.

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 


 

Re: I give up

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Oct 17, 2010 2:18:11 PM
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Edited by varuscelli on Oct 17, 2010 at 2:26:42 PM

dontcarenmore wrote:

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 


 

Wouldn't one possible option for attempting to locate the iPhone be to sign up for a free 60-day MobileMe trial from Apple and use the Find My iPhone function in the trial version?  That would cost nothing  to try, as long as the membership was canceled before the trial period ended.  But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen.  It's just something that came to mind. 

 

The way I see it is that using the phone location services is not to try and get it back yourself (not if it's stolen, in any case), but to perhaps be able to alert authorities to the phone's location. 

 

Maybe I'm misreading the original post, but I don't think the OP's point was to try and retrieve the phone himself -- only to find a way to determine its location. 

 


dontcarenmore wrote:

 

1)    AT&T has the capabilities to attempt to locate my phone.  However, they will not do so unless I sign up for an additional, monthly service (in addition to the services I am currently paying for that I cannot use because I do not have a phone) that probably will not work.  In effect, AT&T is attempting to profit from the theft of my phone.  This makes me extremely angry, especially when I am already upset. 

A Ready Solution: AT&T could easily offer a ‘One time free trial service’ in these instances.  Instead, my family is having to go through the police, who have to acquire a court order, which can take several weeks.  During which time, it becomes harder to find the criminal.  In effect, AT&T is aiding the thief’s escape by delaying.

 


 

Wouldn't one possible option for attempting to locate the iPhone be to sign up for a free 60-day MobileMe trial from Apple and use the Find My iPhone function in the trial version?  That would cost nothing  to try, as long as the membership was canceled before the trial period ended.  But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen.  It's just something that came to mind. 

 

The way I see it is that using the phone location services is not to try and get it back yourself (not if it's stolen, in any case), but to perhaps be able to alert authorities to the phone's location. 

 

Maybe I'm misreading the original post, but I don't think the OP's point was to try and retrieve the phone himself -- only to find a way to determine its location. 

 

Re: I give up

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Oct 17, 2010 3:12:06 PM
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"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.

Re: I give up

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Oct 18, 2010 8:19:39 AM
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drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy


drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy

Re: I give up

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varuscelli wrote:

drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy


I believe you have to setup the mobile me account on the iphone and have to turn on find my phone

 

http://help.apple.com/mobileme/interface/index.html?lang=en#mmfc0f0c67


varuscelli wrote:

drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy


I believe you have to setup the mobile me account on the iphone and have to turn on find my phone

 

http://help.apple.com/mobileme/interface/index.html?lang=en#mmfc0f0c67

Re: I give up

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wingrider01 wrote:

varuscelli wrote:

drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy


I believe you have to setup the mobile me account on the iphone and have to turn on find my phone

 

http://help.apple.com/mobileme/interface/index.html?lang=en#mmfc0f0c67


 

Thanks, wingrider01 -- that definitely explains the part that I had forgotten, in that you must actively go into your iPhone's settings and turn on the Find My iPhone function under the MobileMe account (which needs to be set up by the user) for that function to go into effect. 


wingrider01 wrote:

varuscelli wrote:

drumn_bass wrote:

"But, maybe that can't be done after the iPhone has already been lost or stolen."

 

Nope, it can't.


I don't doubt you here (as an AT&T person, you're more knowledgeable than I am), but can you elaborate as to why it wouldn't work, so the rest of us will know?

 

I ask this because I recently signed up for MobileMe and can't recall having to do anything in particular to the phone to use the Find My iPhone feature.  I admit I might have had to go through a step or two that I don't recall right now (like hooking up my iPhone while logged in to iTunes or MobileMe after signing up, so something to that effect), but I'm truly curious to know more about why this wouldn't work. 

 

And thanks in advance for any elaboration...  Smiley Happy


I believe you have to setup the mobile me account on the iphone and have to turn on find my phone

 

http://help.apple.com/mobileme/interface/index.html?lang=en#mmfc0f0c67


 

Thanks, wingrider01 -- that definitely explains the part that I had forgotten, in that you must actively go into your iPhone's settings and turn on the Find My iPhone function under the MobileMe account (which needs to be set up by the user) for that function to go into effect. 

Re: I give up

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