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Posted Jun 3, 2008
10:15:01 AM
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Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...
Hey everyone,

I'm just dying to get the song "Bittersweet Symphony" by Verve as my ringtone for my razor.  Unfortunately, the two versions they have on the downloads area here at AT&T are not what I am looking for - they are Polyphonic.  I want the actual song.

How would I go about getting that?  Any ideas?
Hey everyone,

I'm just dying to get the song "Bittersweet Symphony" by Verve as my ringtone for my razor.  Unfortunately, the two versions they have on the downloads area here at AT&T are not what I am looking for - they are Polyphonic.  I want the actual song.

How would I go about getting that?  Any ideas?

Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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abking wrote:
Hey everyone,
     I'm just dying to get the song "Bittersweet Symphony" by Verve as my ringtone for my razor.  Unfortunately, the two versions they have on the downloads area here at AT&T are not what I am looking for - they are Polyphonic.  I want the actual song.
     How would I go about getting that?  Any ideas?

    
Young Grasshopper
Posts: 1024
Registered: 02-15-2004
RMskater
My Device: Nokia 6230
Message 1 of 9
Viewed 42634 times as of 10.15.07
 
     Okay, I decided to make this since there are those technically challenged people (not a bad thing) that want to have MP3 ringtones on their phone. This is actually a very easy process, and isn't as bad as it seems. I just have so many pics because I wanted to make this as "step-by-step" as possible. In order to follow my directions exactly, you will need Audacity (free) and Alive MP3 WAV Converter (not free, but if you need help, PM me). However, if you have an audio editor that you're comfortable with and a WAV to MP3 converter, feel free to use that instead, and just adjust my directions for your own programs.
Edit: Lame_enc.dll can be downloaded here. This will get rid of the need to have a converter.
 
1. Find the song that you want to use. It's best to listen to it to find a good 30-40 second chunk of the song that you can extract. Now I know that the phone's max ringer will only ring for 30 seconds, but for some reason, most songs don't have good 30 second chunks, and their chunks seem to end at 40+ seconds. Don't go beyond this though, as it's highly unnecessary, and will only waste space on your phone.
Making an MP3 Ringer
2. Open up Audacity.
Making an MP3 Ringer
3. In Audacity, under the file menu, open up the song file that you want to turn into a ringer.
Making an MP3 Ringer
4. When you open it, you'll get a dialogue box like the one in the pic below, telling you that the MP3 is importing (or whatever file format your song is in).
Making an MP3 Ringer
5. Once your song is done importing, you'll get waves, in correlation with the song's frequency, that looks like below.
Making an MP3 Ringer
6. Take the magnifying glass (upper left of Audacity's workspace) and left-click on the waves to expand it, so you can see the detail of where the song changes and all.
Making an MP3 Ringer
7. In this song ("She's the Blade" by Sugarcult), I liked the way it began, so all I had to do was to find where I wanted it to end (if you want to start the song in a different place, use this step, but backwards, deleting everything that you don't want before ((at step 13, you can see how to cross fade out, but choose cross fade in instead, so it starts low and the volume gets higher))).
Anyways, using the "I-beam" selection, click where you want the song to end.
Making an MP3 Ringer
8. You now have where you want the song to start, and you are going to delete everything after that. Select the magnifying glass and right-click the waves until they get small enough so you can see the whole song on the screen (this way you can select the whole song easily, instead of dragging it past the edge of the workspace to select the whole song).
Making an MP3 Ringer
9. Select from where you clicked and drag to the end of the song. One thing to note is that when you click anywhere in the song and let go, you can select that exact point that you chose as long as you place the cursor over the line and it changes from an arrow to a hand. When it's a hand, the point where you selected will not change when you click (try it, it's easier to see than to explain).
Making an MP3 Ringer
10. Push the "Delete" key and everything you highlighted will disappear.
Making an MP3 Ringer
11. Get the magnifying glass and expand the song's waves again.
Making an MP3 Ringer
12. Now, we are going to fade this song out, because I want it to fade out into silence. Find a good area (at the end, obviously) that would sound good to start fading out and highlight from there to the end of the song.
Making an MP3 Ringer
13. In Audacity, go up to "Effect" and scroll down to the bottom and select Cross Fade Out. This will automatically fade your music out.
Making an MP3 Ringer
14. When you select "Cross Fade Out", the area you have selected will "cone out", like the waves below.
Making an MP3 Ringer
15. Go up to the file menu and select "Export As WAV". Be careful not to select "Export Selection As WAV", otherwise it will only export the cross faded out part (unless you have deselected the waves).
Making an MP3 Ringer
16. Choose where you want to save your file.
Making an MP3 Ringer
17. You will get a dialogue box saying that it is exporting your file into a WAV file. Don't worry if you don't see this box, if you see it, that means that your file is big enough that it's taking some time to export (it should only appear for a few seconds, any long and your song's way too big).
Making an MP3 Ringer
18. Close Audacity. You'll get a dialogue box asking if you want to save changes. For some reason Audacity won't let you save as an MP3 and if you tell it to, it won't actually let you save without some workaround, so just tell it no.
Making an MP3 Ringer
19. Now, I have a program called "dbPowerAMP". I like it because when you hover your cursor over a song file, it shows you the properties (as seen below). This will come into importance in a later step.
Making an MP3 Ringer
Making an MP3 Ringer
20. Open up Alive MP3 WAV Converter (or whatever converter you are using) and hit the big "Play" button in the bottom right of the program to open up the "Open" window.
Making an MP3 Ringer
21. If you didn't delete your WAV file, this is where dpPowerAMP comes in handy, as it's most likely that both the WAV file and the MP3 file will have the same name, so you can hover over it and see which is the MP3 file.
Making an MP3 Ringer
22. When you open up your file, you need to change the quality settings of the final result. Personally, I make it a rule of thumb to have the Kbps (Kilobytes per second) double what the KHz (kilohertz) is. You really don't need the KHz any higher than 24. Any higher than that is wasting space. And don't forget, you don't need stereo on your ringers.
Making an MP3 Ringer
23. If you didn't delete the original MP3 (the source file that you used to create the WAV file), you'll get the box below, asking if you want to overwrite it. If you have a copy of the song, then this is fine. However, if you want to save the song, then copy the song somewhere else, and then select yes.
Making an MP3 Ringer
24. In Alive MP3 WAV Converter, in the bottom right of the program, lights will go around the circle as it is converting. The finished product should be no more than 300Kb.
Making an MP3 Ringer

If you want to use Bluetooth to transfer your ringtone, keep reading. If you use cable or IR, then you can end here and transfer your ringtone that way.
25. Now, the Bluetooth dongle that I got integrates nicely into Windows XP Service Pack 2, so I didn't need to install any extra software. Right-click your song file and go to the "Send To" option and select the "Bluetooth device" option.
Making an MP3 Ringer
26. The following box will pop up. Tell it to browse.
Making an MP3 Ringer
27. It will locate any bluetooth devices around it, with the visibility set as "On".
Making an MP3 Ringer
28. If you have already paired your devices, the next box will show the devices that you have connected (even if their Bluetooth is off, or even if they themselves are off). Select the device that you want to send your new ringer to.
Making an MP3 Ringer
29. Once you confirm on your phone (if your phone needs to confirm file transfers), it will send your ringer over.
Making an MP3 Ringer
30. And you're done! You've made and transfered your own ringtone! :-D
Making an MP3 Ringer
     I'll upload the finished product so you can all hear later. The site I upload my stuff is currently undergoing maintainance, so I can't upload it at the moment.


abking wrote:
Hey everyone,
     I'm just dying to get the song "Bittersweet Symphony" by Verve as my ringtone for my razor.  Unfortunately, the two versions they have on the downloads area here at AT&T are not what I am looking for - they are Polyphonic.  I want the actual song.
     How would I go about getting that?  Any ideas?

    
Young Grasshopper
Posts: 1024
Registered: 02-15-2004
RMskater
My Device: Nokia 6230
Message 1 of 9
Viewed 42634 times as of 10.15.07
 
     Okay, I decided to make this since there are those technically challenged people (not a bad thing) that want to have MP3 ringtones on their phone. This is actually a very easy process, and isn't as bad as it seems. I just have so many pics because I wanted to make this as "step-by-step" as possible. In order to follow my directions exactly, you will need Audacity (free) and Alive MP3 WAV Converter (not free, but if you need help, PM me). However, if you have an audio editor that you're comfortable with and a WAV to MP3 converter, feel free to use that instead, and just adjust my directions for your own programs.
Edit: Lame_enc.dll can be downloaded here. This will get rid of the need to have a converter.
 
1. Find the song that you want to use. It's best to listen to it to find a good 30-40 second chunk of the song that you can extract. Now I know that the phone's max ringer will only ring for 30 seconds, but for some reason, most songs don't have good 30 second chunks, and their chunks seem to end at 40+ seconds. Don't go beyond this though, as it's highly unnecessary, and will only waste space on your phone.
Making an MP3 Ringer
2. Open up Audacity.
Making an MP3 Ringer
3. In Audacity, under the file menu, open up the song file that you want to turn into a ringer.
Making an MP3 Ringer
4. When you open it, you'll get a dialogue box like the one in the pic below, telling you that the MP3 is importing (or whatever file format your song is in).
Making an MP3 Ringer
5. Once your song is done importing, you'll get waves, in correlation with the song's frequency, that looks like below.
Making an MP3 Ringer
6. Take the magnifying glass (upper left of Audacity's workspace) and left-click on the waves to expand it, so you can see the detail of where the song changes and all.
Making an MP3 Ringer
7. In this song ("She's the Blade" by Sugarcult), I liked the way it began, so all I had to do was to find where I wanted it to end (if you want to start the song in a different place, use this step, but backwards, deleting everything that you don't want before ((at step 13, you can see how to cross fade out, but choose cross fade in instead, so it starts low and the volume gets higher))).
Anyways, using the "I-beam" selection, click where you want the song to end.
Making an MP3 Ringer
8. You now have where you want the song to start, and you are going to delete everything after that. Select the magnifying glass and right-click the waves until they get small enough so you can see the whole song on the screen (this way you can select the whole song easily, instead of dragging it past the edge of the workspace to select the whole song).
Making an MP3 Ringer
9. Select from where you clicked and drag to the end of the song. One thing to note is that when you click anywhere in the song and let go, you can select that exact point that you chose as long as you place the cursor over the line and it changes from an arrow to a hand. When it's a hand, the point where you selected will not change when you click (try it, it's easier to see than to explain).
Making an MP3 Ringer
10. Push the "Delete" key and everything you highlighted will disappear.
Making an MP3 Ringer
11. Get the magnifying glass and expand the song's waves again.
Making an MP3 Ringer
12. Now, we are going to fade this song out, because I want it to fade out into silence. Find a good area (at the end, obviously) that would sound good to start fading out and highlight from there to the end of the song.
Making an MP3 Ringer
13. In Audacity, go up to "Effect" and scroll down to the bottom and select Cross Fade Out. This will automatically fade your music out.
Making an MP3 Ringer
14. When you select "Cross Fade Out", the area you have selected will "cone out", like the waves below.
Making an MP3 Ringer
15. Go up to the file menu and select "Export As WAV". Be careful not to select "Export Selection As WAV", otherwise it will only export the cross faded out part (unless you have deselected the waves).
Making an MP3 Ringer
16. Choose where you want to save your file.
Making an MP3 Ringer
17. You will get a dialogue box saying that it is exporting your file into a WAV file. Don't worry if you don't see this box, if you see it, that means that your file is big enough that it's taking some time to export (it should only appear for a few seconds, any long and your song's way too big).
Making an MP3 Ringer
18. Close Audacity. You'll get a dialogue box asking if you want to save changes. For some reason Audacity won't let you save as an MP3 and if you tell it to, it won't actually let you save without some workaround, so just tell it no.
Making an MP3 Ringer
19. Now, I have a program called "dbPowerAMP". I like it because when you hover your cursor over a song file, it shows you the properties (as seen below). This will come into importance in a later step.
Making an MP3 Ringer
Making an MP3 Ringer
20. Open up Alive MP3 WAV Converter (or whatever converter you are using) and hit the big "Play" button in the bottom right of the program to open up the "Open" window.
Making an MP3 Ringer
21. If you didn't delete your WAV file, this is where dpPowerAMP comes in handy, as it's most likely that both the WAV file and the MP3 file will have the same name, so you can hover over it and see which is the MP3 file.
Making an MP3 Ringer
22. When you open up your file, you need to change the quality settings of the final result. Personally, I make it a rule of thumb to have the Kbps (Kilobytes per second) double what the KHz (kilohertz) is. You really don't need the KHz any higher than 24. Any higher than that is wasting space. And don't forget, you don't need stereo on your ringers.
Making an MP3 Ringer
23. If you didn't delete the original MP3 (the source file that you used to create the WAV file), you'll get the box below, asking if you want to overwrite it. If you have a copy of the song, then this is fine. However, if you want to save the song, then copy the song somewhere else, and then select yes.
Making an MP3 Ringer
24. In Alive MP3 WAV Converter, in the bottom right of the program, lights will go around the circle as it is converting. The finished product should be no more than 300Kb.
Making an MP3 Ringer

If you want to use Bluetooth to transfer your ringtone, keep reading. If you use cable or IR, then you can end here and transfer your ringtone that way.
25. Now, the Bluetooth dongle that I got integrates nicely into Windows XP Service Pack 2, so I didn't need to install any extra software. Right-click your song file and go to the "Send To" option and select the "Bluetooth device" option.
Making an MP3 Ringer
26. The following box will pop up. Tell it to browse.
Making an MP3 Ringer
27. It will locate any bluetooth devices around it, with the visibility set as "On".
Making an MP3 Ringer
28. If you have already paired your devices, the next box will show the devices that you have connected (even if their Bluetooth is off, or even if they themselves are off). Select the device that you want to send your new ringer to.
Making an MP3 Ringer
29. Once you confirm on your phone (if your phone needs to confirm file transfers), it will send your ringer over.
Making an MP3 Ringer
30. And you're done! You've made and transfered your own ringtone! :-D
Making an MP3 Ringer
     I'll upload the finished product so you can all hear later. The site I upload my stuff is currently undergoing maintainance, so I can't upload it at the moment.

Re: Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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Jun 3, 2008 11:32:14 AM
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Oh awesome!  Thank you.  I've got to go get a bluetooth dongle, I don't actually have one on my PC.  Smiley Happy  I have everything else but one of those, go figure.
Oh awesome!  Thank you.  I've got to go get a bluetooth dongle, I don't actually have one on my PC.  Smiley Happy  I have everything else but one of those, go figure.

Re: Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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Jun 14, 2008 8:28:02 PM
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Myxer.com   
 
bo charge for anything, unless of course you get the ones made by Myxer themselves...
Myxer.com   
 
bo charge for anything, unless of course you get the ones made by Myxer themselves...

Re: Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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Jun 17, 2008 4:37:27 AM
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I've been using Myxer Tones for a couple of years now and its free EXCEPT that  text messaging charges apply because that's how they get the clips to your phone. You also take downloaded songs from your computer and can create your own ringtones as well. If you found the above process easy, this website is even easier. Just sign up for free.
I've been using Myxer Tones for a couple of years now and its free EXCEPT that  text messaging charges apply because that's how they get the clips to your phone. You also take downloaded songs from your computer and can create your own ringtones as well. If you found the above process easy, this website is even easier. Just sign up for free.

Re: Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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Jun 21, 2008 10:54:13 AM
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Mobile17 would allow you to convert that song to a ringtone with minimal effort as well.
Mobile17 would allow you to convert that song to a ringtone with minimal effort as well.

Re: Hey everyone, I'm just dying to get the song "Bitte...

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