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Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

Professor

Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

After updating my iPhone 4 to 4.0.1, I noticed that by bars are constantly jumping around between 3 and 5 bars while sitting in one place.  This is with a case on the phone, and is the same as what I was seeing with iOS 4.0 before putting the case on.  Putting the case on stabilized the signal display at 5 bars, but now with 4.0.1, it's back to jumping around.

 

I understand that the bars weren't real on 4.0, so after the 4.0.1 fix, I wouldn't be surprised if it changed to a solid 4 or even 3 bars in the same location.  I also wouldn't be surprised if it swapped between 5-4 bars of 4-3 bars if my signal happened to be right at the cut off between two bars.  But swinging two bars while sitting in a fixed location is unexpected.  Does the signal strength from the towers really vary that much that often?

 

BTW, I tried with the case on and off, and it doesn't seem to make any difference.  Still swings over a three bar range.

 

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Message 1 of 26
Contributor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

My new iPhone 4 drops about half of my calls.  I updated the software to 4.01, now I still lose lots of calls.  My 3G did not do this, same calls, same place.  So, I sat outside watching bars on my phone and my wife's iPhone (newest software also) and they fluctuated from 5 to none and back again.   Not necessarily in sync with each other.   My iPhone fluctuated more.  It will stay with, say 3 bars for 4 minutes, then down to none.  Then back to two, then 4 or even 5.  I tried holding the phone different ways with sweaty hands, no effect. 

 

I don't care a bit about bars, but I want to make calls reliably and cannot. I like my phone except for this. I will reset network settings and see if that makes a difference. 

Message 16 of 26
ACE - Professor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

@enjoyableness,

 

If you just set the phone down on a table, does it behave?

 

Do you have any kind of bumber/case on it, or is it bare metal?


 
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 17 of 26
Professor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

I wasn't having problems with my iPhone 4 before the update, so I really didn't see any improvement.

 

However, I still find it strange every time I look at the signal bars on my iPhone 4 now, since Apple increased the actual size of the bars, so that you still see one tall bar in bad reception areas, instead of a nearly flat one. Just gonna have to get used to it, I guess. 

Message 18 of 26
Contributor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

Hi

  I do not have a bumper, but when I observed the phones for 20 minutes, they were sitting on a table.  I then held them, that had no effect on the number of bars.

  I did the network reset, seemed to work, but at an outdoor party, bars again went from 5 to 1 while I watched.

  This seems like a network problem, not a phone problem, but advice from anyone would be welcome.

Message 19 of 26
Mentor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

Jumpy bars? oh no not jumpy bars i have 1bar compaired to everybody else with a 3Gs around me with 5... i used to have 5 but after 4.1 i get 1

 

Message 20 of 26
Tutor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

My two cents: It seems as if the signal strength issue has all been a very successful snowing of the comsumer. Why? Because it appears that AT&T (and possibly Apple) conspired to make cosumers believe that they were getting better signal strength all along. Now that the issue with the iPhone 4 has come to light, the 4.1 update to all of the 3G based iPhones shows the TRUE nature of the signal strength. I know this because I have a 3G iPhone which has not been updated to 4.1 and when I stand in the same place in my house and compare the readout of the signal strength of that phone to an 3G iPhone with the 4.1 update it shows 1 bar versus 5! on the other one. What does that tell you? Think of it this way: your car's fuel gauge shows that your tank is full when in reality it is only 3/4 full. Eventually, you will figure out that your gauge is reading incorrectly when you run out of gas...which to me is the same as having a dropped call when the signal is non-existent, even if your status bars indicate otherwise. People would be all over the company that made their cars, claiming that it was a design flaw. But what if it wasn't...maybe they were trying to make you think you were getting better gas mileage. I'm sure there would be a lawsuit someplace claiming false advertising. What's the difference here?

Message 21 of 26
Professor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

Apple designed the signal strength formula used on their phone, not AT&T, so it's probably more an Apple issue than AT&T.  From what I understand all the phone manufacturers have their own formulas.  In your analogy, the car manufacturer is the one responsible for the accuracy of your gas gauge, not the entity who makes the road that you drive the car on.

Message 22 of 26
Teacher

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

GUYS!!!! relax, this is strictly the ATT network. with every iphone release it is estimated millions of new customers switch over to ATT just to get the iphone.... millions switched from other companies, myself included from tmobile, to get the new iphone, and it makes the network, horrible for a couple months. this hapened with the 3g and the 3gs also!....wait a few months, let att reinforce their network to handle the new million sumtin members, also pray that apple teams up with verizon, a lot of ppl will bolt from att, and the network will once again be on point for calls and data.
Message 23 of 26
Tutor

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

Perhaps my analogy of this situation is a bit clumsy, but this is a forum to share ideas so let's not split hairs here. If there is no federal or state standard across the board for how to calculate a phone's signal strength than there needs to be one. Imagine if every car maker released fuel economy results for their models using different formulas...there would be wide variations between comparable models. People who trust big companies (such as AT&T) to be honest about their products and services are not being realistic.

 

The iPhone is now in it's fourth generation, so in my mind AT&T has had ample time to ramp up their network to accomodate the increase in data and voice traffic. You can't tell me that product planners at AT&T were so caught off guard by the success of the iPhone that they did not see the need to expand their networks to handle it. Up until the success of the iPhone, the cell phone industry was static in terms of how many customers each carrier had. Of course any cell phone company would like to have a product as successful as the iPhone, because it is the only way to grow the business and increase company stock value. Personally, I'd like to see our system changed so that we can buy any kind of phone we want, pick a carrier and be done with it, just as consumers do in other parts of the world. This would force the cell phone carriers to provide better service, and allow us to have more product choices. The way the system is set up now, if you like a particular phone, but not the carrier, you are S.O.L.

 

Regarding those who are waiting for Verizon to offer the iPhone: be prepared to wait it out until Verizon changes over from CDMA to GSM. I too would've preferred to have had Verizon as my carrier for my iPhone. If you look at Consumer Reports annual ratings of cell phone providers, Verizon comes out on top in almost every major metro market here in the U.S. AT&T is in the number three position, ahead of Sprint and behind t-mobile. The only reason they came in third was because of their better customer service than Sprint, not the quality of the signal strength. What company, such as Apple, would want to produce a phone that only works in one market in the world? Think about it.

 

 

 

Message 24 of 26
Scholar

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?

I wouldn't consider gas mileage and cell phone signal strength the same thing.
Message 25 of 26
Highlighted

Re: Anyone else having jumpy bars after 4.0.1 update?


ejcf3 wrote:

Perhaps my analogy of this situation is a bit clumsy, but this is a forum to share ideas so let's not split hairs here. If there is no federal or state standard across the board for how to calculate a phone's signal strength than there needs to be one. Imagine if every car maker released fuel economy results for their models using different formulas...there would be wide variations between comparable models. People who trust big companies (such as AT&T) to be honest about their products and services are not being realistic.

 

The iPhone is now in it's fourth generation, so in my mind AT&T has had ample time to ramp up their network to accommodate the increase in data and voice traffic. You can't tell me that product planners at AT&T were so caught off guard by the success of the iPhone that they did not see the need to expand their networks to handle it. Up until the success of the iPhone, the cell phone industry was static in terms of how many customers each carrier had. Of course any cell phone company would like to have a product as successful as the iPhone, because it is the only way to grow the business and increase company stock value. Personally, I'd like to see our system changed so that we can buy any kind of phone we want, pick a carrier and be done with it, just as consumers do in other parts of the world. This would force the cell phone carriers to provide better service, and allow us to have more product choices. The way the system is set up now, if you like a particular phone, but not the carrier, you are S.O.L.

 

Regarding those who are waiting for Verizon to offer the iPhone: be prepared to wait it out until Verizon changes over from CDMA to GSM. I too would've preferred to have had Verizon as my carrier for my iPhone. If you look at Consumer Reports annual ratings of cell phone providers, Verizon comes out on top in almost every major metro market here in the U.S. AT&T is in the number three position, ahead of Sprint and behind t-mobile. The only reason they came in third was because of their better customer service than Sprint, not the quality of the signal strength. What company, such as Apple, would want to produce a phone that only works in one market in the world? Think about it.

 

 

 


I submit for your consideration:

 

You need to go back and see that the signal strength issue was Apple's, not at&t's.  I do believe they are now using at&t's algorithm for this calculation.  Apple had it wrong from day 1.  This is clear if you go back and actually read news articles about it.

 

Consider the following:

 

1.  I'm not so sure the cell industry was "stagnant" with number of customers.  Clearly, the industry shifted from an emphasis on voice over to emphasis on data.  That changes everything.  Go try to find data usage amounts  between the carrier's networks.  Who carries the bulk of the data? Then find capital spend and the money all of them pour into their networks.  It is mind boggling the cumulative amount they all spend.  You cannot build networks as fast as you think.  And they all have been doing this for years.  Ample time for a non-network person (of which I am not a network type either) to know what it takes to "ramp up" the network is in ones own mind and not based on anything.

 

2.  If you want to buy your phone and go to your carrier of choice, you phone cost will sky rocket.  Look at retail price vs. 2 year contract subsidized price.  Look back at the original iPhone sales when it was not subsidized vs. the next 3 subsidized models.  The subsidized model speaks for itself.  Not too many people would be willing to fork out the retail price of a smartphone.   You then have the issue of network technologies.  at&t and t-mobile have one, Verizon and Sprint have another.  You cannot force all companies onto one technology.

 

Finally, Verizon will never be on GSM.  They are switching to LTE.

 

Also this statement "What company, such as Apple, would want to produce a phone that only works in one market in the world? Think about it." ...............I have no idea what this means.

 

My whole point is perception and reality are not necessarily running parallel in this world of ours.  And this is, as always, IMHO.  I'm here as a fellow customer.....

 


I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinion.
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