AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Scholar

AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Again like Dual-core HTC ONE X AT&T are going to launch Dual-core Samsung GALAXY S® III. 

 

AT&T Samsung SIII has 1.5GHz dual-core processor, like HTC ONE X>>>> LOL. Quad-core should be announced in USA first then anywhere. but the process is 69, International version has the Quad core & usa version is Dual Core.


 http://www.att.com/galaxysiii/#fbid=rTTks8CkSAN

 

Thanx in Advance

Message 1 of 22 (2,384 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

I hear that the quad-core processors that are available now don't play well with US cellular networks.  This is why we get the dual-core processors here.

 

I have the international HTC One X.  Graphics performance is smoother on my AT&T Galaxy Note than on the One X.

Message 2 of 22 (2,371 Views)
Highlighted
Scholar

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

The samsung quad-core exynos or whatever they call it is supposedly not compatible with LTE as it needs  another radio band and all of this junk is  stuffed on a board.  They will use the dual core in its place for everyone except T-Mo.  Samsung still can use the quad core but they would have to add another board and that would make the phone thicker (not that I care.)   I would rather a thicker phone w/ a hefty all day battery than all this thin nonsense.

Message 3 of 22 (2,354 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Qualcomm just hasn't released a quad core CPU with LTE support, but they are working on it.  Quad core or dual core, it doesn't matter.  Few apps are optimized for quad core, and won't anytime soon.  Performance is virtually the same.  The Snapdragon S4 on the One X beats the quad core version on some benchmarks, and the quad core wins on others.  And in real life, you will likely not notice any difference, they both freaking fly.  Quad core is just for marketing, and for nerds that want to fling around cool catch phrases.

Message 4 of 22 (2,352 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<


kinghdmi wrote:

The samsung quad-core exynos or whatever they call it is supposedly not compatible with LTE as it needs  another radio band and all of this junk is  stuffed on a board.  They will use the dual core in its place for everyone except T-Mo.  Samsung still can use the quad core but they would have to add another board and that would make the phone thicker (not that I care.)   I would rather a thicker phone w/ a hefty all day battery than all this thin nonsense.


T-Mobile is getting the dual-core processor version, as well.  The Samsung Galaxy S III phones should be virtually identical regardless of carrier, with the exception of the radios and the pre-installed bloatware.  They aren't doing the one phone-seven variants thing this time around like they did with the original Galaxy S line.

Message 5 of 22 (2,349 Views)
Scholar

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Quad=4, dual=2 but 4 is not = 2, 4>2. This is the carriers weak point about The Quad-core in LTE network. whatever the Quad is frm Exynos or Qualcomm. Technology is based on real action in real life, no theory work here, only practical and real
Message 6 of 22 (2,314 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

[ Edited ]

redhot4400 wrote:
Quad=4, dual=2 but 4 is not = 2, 4>2. This is the carriers weak point about The Quad-core in LTE network. whatever the Quad is frm Exynos or Qualcomm. Technology is based on real action in real life, no theory work here, only practical and real

 

You, my friend, do not understand how multi cores work.  If apps are not optimized for multi cores, than they don't benefit from more cores.  You will only see the benefit in multi taking (switching between apps, processes in background).  I have a single core HTC Flyer that runs circles around the dual core tablets that came out around the same time.

 

This will be the same as with the One X, where everyone was flipping out because the AT&T version was "only" dual core.  Until benchmarks showed it beating the quad core in most benchmarks, and using much less battery.

Message 7 of 22 (2,278 Views)
Scholar

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

so the matter is no available Quad core technology for LTE right now for smartphones. means QUALCOMM & Exynos they are unable to make the Quad-core for LTE. But don't go for performance, because first it was single core then dual-core and now the latest invention is Quad-Core (1 then 2 then 4).
Message 8 of 22 (2,131 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

[ Edited ]

Correct, quad core smartphone CPUs (really SoCs) simply don't exist with LTE support at this time.  Not sure about Samsung's proprietary Exynos SoC, but NVIDIA will not have a quad core Tegra  SoC with LTE support until late this year or even early next year.  Qualcomm is probably next year, also. 

 

What I'm also reading is that the dual core CPU on the SGS3 is clocked at 1.5 GHz, versus 1.4 GHz for the quad core.  This means that apps not optimizing multi cores may actually run faster on the dual core CPU.  So advantages of quad core will likely only be seen while multi-tasking and possibly in the Android interface itself such as the home page and app drawer (I believe ICS is optimized for quad core).  There are other things to consider also (which determine how fast/smooth a phone feels), such as the GPU.

 

All in all, the dual vs. quad core debate is largely just a marketing gimmick for now.  The difference between the dual core and quad core SGS3 is going to be insignificant (or the dual core may even be faster overall).  What does make a huge difference is LTE.  If you are in an LTE market, your data speeds get a huge boost.  I've gone from average 3-4 Mbps at my work to 29 Mbps.  My AT&T data speed at my house was miserable on HSPA, with speeds at 0.5 to 1 Mbps, and often even lower than that.   A few times the data network was just crawling, and I tested it at 0.1 Mbps.  Now on LTE, I get data speeds at the same location at 27 Mbps.  No more painful dialup like speeds at my house.

 

And even if you aren't currenlty in an LTE market, AT&T is rolling out LTE at a pretty decent pace.  Faster than I originally thought, and I think outpacing Verizon.  So even if LTE is not in your area now, it may be sometime soon.

 

 

Message 9 of 22 (2,104 Views)

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Right now, there are very few viable LTE radios from manufacturers other than Qualcomm.  Somehow I've seen LTE radios hung off of TI OMAP4 CPUs, and also off of Samsung's old Hummingbird (see Droid Charge), but it seems like the general theme is:  Support for AT&T's LTE bands currently requires a Qualcomm LTE radio.  Qualcomm won't allow their radio chips to be used with Samsung CPUs.

 

This will change when Intel releases the LTE version of their X-Gold radio chipset series, which is what Samsung uses in nearly all of their HSPA devices.

 

As to performance:

The individual cores of the Snapdragon S4 are significantly more powerful than the cores of the Exynos 4412.

However:  I believe the GPU is weaker, and more importantly, due to being a vastly different configuration from  the international variant, the AT&T variant will lag in updates even more than typical for AT&T handsets.  If you're into using custom firmwares (such as Cyanogenmod), there will be far less development for carrier-mangled version, as there almost always is.

 

Personally:  I won't touch the AT&T-mangled version with a ten foot pole.  I'm probably not even going to bother with the international version since it offers little that my international Note doesn't.  My next device may be the international Note 2 - especially if it lives up to its dual-core Exynos5 rumors.

Message 10 of 22 (2,095 Views)
Scholar

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

In Samsung-
Exynos 5 Dual core 32 nm (in SIII usa careers): LTE supported,
Exynos 4 Quad-core 45nm (international version SIII): LTE is not supported but and also have powerful Mali 400 GPU,
Exynos 4 dual-core 45nm (in SII Skyrocket) LTE / non LTE both supported
So they are trying to make the processor size more small from 45nm to 32 nm and then 28nm and lower power consumption matter.
Only due to the LTE support USA careers are not able to use Quad Core. But Japan has made the solution about Quad-core for their LTE in Tegra 3. Nvidia Tegra 3 is the most powerful and very good processor for Smartphone. But as usa careers yet not able to build a business relation with Nvidia Tegra3.
plz spend a little time in the below webpage:
http://www.technobuffalo.com/comparisons/benchmarked-nvidia-tegra-3-vs-qualcomm-snapdragon-s4/
Thanx in Advance
Message 11 of 22 (2,053 Views)
Professor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

Still missing the whole point.  You're wringing your hands over something that is completely insignificant.  You can worry about miniscule differences in CPU performance.  But for me, I'll take LTE over the quad core (with no LTE) any day.

Message 12 of 22 (1,856 Views)
Contributor

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

What about AT&T not offering the 32GB version of the S3?

Message 13 of 22 (1,820 Views)
Teacher

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<

"What about AT&T not offering the 32GB version of the S3?"

 

It doesn't matter because this phone has an SD card slot. 16 Gigs is plenty for apps that are required to remain on the phone.

 

Side note, I love how AT&T is advertising their low price 16 gig SD card for $40. You can get the same card for $12 at Walmart.

Message 14 of 22 (1,786 Views)

Re: AT&T Samsung GALAXY S® III <<<<


redpoint73 wrote:

Still missing the whole point.  You're wringing your hands over something that is completely insignificant.  You can worry about miniscule differences in CPU performance.  But for me, I'll take LTE over the quad core (with no LTE) any day.


That's the problem - LTE right now is not ready for prime time.  It still entails major negative impacts to power management.

 

LTE won't provide acceptable battery life until late 2012 or early 2013.

Message 15 of 22 (1,777 Views)
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