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New Installation switching from cable

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New Installation switching from cable

 

I am considering switching to U-verse and internet from cable.  I want to make sure I have the best layout/installation for optimally service.  I have a few question, you can see my sketch for reference:

1) I currently have my cable modem and router in my den, would that be the best location for the RG and WI-FI gateway?  Or, should I have the RG near the location where telephone enters my house.

1a) The den is the best location for WI-FI, If the best location for RG is near entry to the house could I run CAT5 from the RG to the WI-FI in the den?

1c) I read the DVR should be near the RG.  If I have the RG in the den, would it be best to have the DVR there even though there is not TV.  I can get an extra set-top box since 4 are included in the current promotion.

2) I currently have several cable jacks in the house but, they are 20 year old RG59.  Will they still be acceptable to use or should I make sure CAT5 is installed.  I have a basement under the house it would not be too much effort to run new CAT5 is that is the better way to go.

3) Where I have TV3 I do not have a cable jack.  Should I have cable installed or do the wireless receivers work equally as well.

Thanks, I would appreciate any input you can provide before I get the equipment installed.

 

uverse copy.jpg

 

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Message 1 of 7
ACE - Expert
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Accepted by dman97
‎10-04-2017 3:51 PM

Re: New Installation switching from cable

1) You will need a direct run of Cat5e from the NID to the Gateway.  The installer will want to expend as little time installing this Cat5e as possible (because he's pushed to complete jobs quickly) and will not fish cable through walls.  If you're going to rely on the RG's wireless, then you'll want that in the central location.  So, you can either run/fish the Cat5e from near the NID to your desired RG location (and let the installer terminate it on each end), or hope the installer likes your choice of RG location.  You could also use an additional access point for Wi-Fi and turn off the Wi-Fi on the Gateway as desired.

1c) The DVR does not need to be physically near the RG, but it does need a direct Cat5e Ethernet connection to the RG.

2) RG59 is considered not sufficient quality to run the HPNA network off of (minimum standard is RG6), and AT&T now avoids COAX whenever possible, preferring Ethernet on Cat5e and Wireless connections (other than the DVR).

3) Wireless receivers work well for some, and not so well for others.  It depends largely on your wall composition, distance, if the dedicated access point is on the same floor as the Wireless receiver, etc.  Note that if you go wireless that the wireless access point (WAP) should be placed at least a meter from the Gateway to reduce interference between them.  

 

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Message 2 of 7
Expert

Re: New Installation switching from cable

@dman97 - You should be aware that u-verse may have signal limitations based on the outside plant. While this is adequate for most it is not for everyone.

1) cable provides all (or almost all) channels to the house & each TV/STB tunes out the one desired. U-verse has four chan streams into the house. Each TV/STB communicates back take the server which one to select out of the full list. But, you can only have four at time being watched or recorded. This may vary for your case. Ask your tech to explain full details, including HD.

 

2) If your internet speed is over 12, that will be without TV on. When you turn a TV on it may reduce the internet to 12. If you really need/want full value/max speed, you may want to limit the speed purchased to 12.

Message 3 of 7
ACE - Expert

Re: New Installation switching from cable

A note: the figure aviewer quotes in his post above (12 Mbps) assumes that you are assigned a communication profile sync rate of 32 Mbps.  Your communication profile assignment depends on what your line(s) are capable of and your High Speed Internet (HSI) bandwidth purchased; the problem with aviewer's advice is that you might limit yourself to 12 Mbps when you could have had a sync rate of well over 50 Mbps and enjoyed 40+ Mbps HSI if you ordered the 50 Mbps service (if available).

 

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*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 4 of 7
Teacher

Re: New Installation switching from cable

Thank you all for the input.  It sounds like CAT5e is the best way to go.  To make sure I get a clean install I will take care if it myself.  Is all CAT5e the same or are there certain characteristics I need to look for.  Should I consider CAT6? 

Message 5 of 7
ACE - Expert

Re: New Installation switching from cable

Cat5e is not all the same, but (if actually Cat5e) adheres to a minimum standard which is okay for your use.  The only major differences in cabling would be: stranded or solid core, plenum vs non-plenum, and shielded vs UTP:

Solid core is preferred for long runs, stranded core is preferred where the cable will get bent or manipulated a lot.  Your plugs/jack hardware should match the kind of cable, and I think most AT&T termination will expect solid core.

Plenum may be required by building codes, non-plenum is cheaper.

Shielded is worthless unless properly grounded, and probably not worth your money even then.

 

Cat6 is certified to run higher speeds over longer distances than Cat5e, but unless you're going to make 100 meter runs, Cat5e is fine for the job.

 

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Re: New Installation switching from cable

cat6 RJ45 plugs are harder to put on than cat5e...a lot harder. At least they are for me and I've tried several different kinds (with the guides and without) and I want to rip my hair out in frustration every time I do it. I can do the RJ45 plugs on cat5e all day long and have near 100% success rate. Not so with cat6. Now, if you're going to do the keystone 110 jacks on both ends then it doesn't matter. Those things are a piece of cake regardless of whether it's cat5e or cat6. Just make sure you punch them down good. Investing in a cheap ($10) 8-conductor continuity tester for ethernet cables is highly recommended to ensure you get good terminations.

 

I think cat5e UTP with solid strand copper will be fine for your need. It's easy to work with and terminate and it's good for 1 gbps using cheap switches. It's good for 2.5 gbps using the more expensive 802.3bz switches. Cat6 is slightly more expensive, but it's good for 10 gbps up to 50m. If you want future proofing then go with Cat6 or even Cat6a. I did my house in Cat6.

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