static ip's question

Teacher

static ip's question

is it not possible to assign devices on your network static ip's with just the RG? do u have to have your own router installed behind it to assign a static ip? (using a 3801 HGV 2wire router)

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Employee

Re: static ip's question

You may do as you inquiry by purchasing a block of static IPs, I believe a block of 8 with 5 user able is $15 a month.

http://www.att.com/esupport/article.jsp?sid=KB401631&cv=803
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ACE - Master

Re: static ip's question


Tom21_1993 wrote:

is it not possible to assign devices on your network static ip's with just the RG? do u have to have your own router installed behind it to assign a static ip? (using a 3801 HGV 2wire router)


You can go to the client you want to set the static IP on (such as a computer/laptop) and manually configure the network connection.  Your IP will need to be 192.168.1.XXX (and not in use yet) the subnet will be 255.255.255.0, and the default gateway will be 192.168.1.254.  Once it's hard coded in the client device you can go to Settings -> Lan -> IP Address Allocation in the 3801 and it should change to "Static IP - No DHCP".  The client device might require a re-boot to obtain the new static IP address from the 3801. 

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Expert

Re: static ip's question

There are two kinds of static IP addresses:

One is a local private static IP, where your device inside your LAN is assigned a private IP address that never changes. This is useful for servers, printers, etc. You can assign one of these IP addresses either by going into the configuration of the device and manually assigning an IP address that is within the LAN's subnet (but not within the DHCP range), or you can assign it by telling the U-Verse gateway to give that device a particular IP address. This way, the device's configuration setting stays on DHCP, but every time it "renews" its IP address, the U-Verse gateway will give it the same one.

The second type of static IP is a registered, routable static IP address. These addresses are routable on the Internet and are registered (assigned to you and no one else in the world). AT&T makes blocks of 8 (5 usable) available for $15 per month. These addresses are used for servers that must accept incoming connections from the Internet, such as a web server, mail server, etc. In many cases, this type of static IP address is not necessary because garden-variety services like HTTP can be made to work properly using the DMZPlus mode instead.

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