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Posted Mar 14, 2014
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Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

http://www.multichannel.com/blogs/bauminator/what’s-ahead-u-verse

 

AT&T’s gambit to go all-IP from the start with U-verse was a smooth move, particularly on the apps front. While cable struggled to do anything exciting and new in the QAM video world without having to go through months of regression testing, AT&T’s IP platform has enabled it to sprint out in front and offer dozens of apps.

 

Cable operators, meanwhile, are in catch-up mode as they start the IP migration process.  Comcast’s X1 platform offers only a small set of set of apps. RCN unleashed a whopping 98 apps when it introduced the Opera TV Store on its TiVo platform last month. Verizon hopes to accelerate FiOS TV's IPTV shift after acquiring Intel Media's OnCue assets.

 

AT&T, meanwhile, has an advantage over them in that it’s already doing it all on IP. There’s no migration path to take. It’s already there.

 

“What 100% IP does is, it allows us to really upgrade our customer base,” GW Shaw (pictured at left), AT&T’s vice president, U-verse and video services, said in a recent interview. “[Whether] you were the very first customer we brought on or you’re the customer I brought on last week, you have the same U-verse TV service.”

 

But there are areas where AT&T U-verse TV is playing catchup – electronic sell-through and the cloud DVR among them.

 

U-verse hasn’t committed to an EST strategy, which is now part of the FiOS TV and Comcast video arsenals, but AT&T “is absolutely looking at what our opportunities are with electronic sell-through,” Shaw said.

 

Comcast has also rolled out a cloud-DVR product in Boston that runs on its X1 platform, and is expected to expand deployments to other markets in its northeast corridor soon, with Chicago rumored to be among the cities further out west that could get it by this summer.

“We’re analyzing our options as well on what we could or couldn’t do to have the content rights work with [a cloud DVR],” Shaw said.

 

“The technology doesn’t scare me at all on it,” Shaw said of the cloud DVR. “It’s all of the other pieces … that have to fall in line to make that experience [work] the right way and to deliver the kind of experience that a customer would find exemplary.”

http://www.multichannel.com/blogs/bauminator/what’s-ahead-u-verse

 

AT&T’s gambit to go all-IP from the start with U-verse was a smooth move, particularly on the apps front. While cable struggled to do anything exciting and new in the QAM video world without having to go through months of regression testing, AT&T’s IP platform has enabled it to sprint out in front and offer dozens of apps.

 

Cable operators, meanwhile, are in catch-up mode as they start the IP migration process.  Comcast’s X1 platform offers only a small set of set of apps. RCN unleashed a whopping 98 apps when it introduced the Opera TV Store on its TiVo platform last month. Verizon hopes to accelerate FiOS TV's IPTV shift after acquiring Intel Media's OnCue assets.

 

AT&T, meanwhile, has an advantage over them in that it’s already doing it all on IP. There’s no migration path to take. It’s already there.

 

“What 100% IP does is, it allows us to really upgrade our customer base,” GW Shaw (pictured at left), AT&T’s vice president, U-verse and video services, said in a recent interview. “[Whether] you were the very first customer we brought on or you’re the customer I brought on last week, you have the same U-verse TV service.”

 

But there are areas where AT&T U-verse TV is playing catchup – electronic sell-through and the cloud DVR among them.

 

U-verse hasn’t committed to an EST strategy, which is now part of the FiOS TV and Comcast video arsenals, but AT&T “is absolutely looking at what our opportunities are with electronic sell-through,” Shaw said.

 

Comcast has also rolled out a cloud-DVR product in Boston that runs on its X1 platform, and is expected to expand deployments to other markets in its northeast corridor soon, with Chicago rumored to be among the cities further out west that could get it by this summer.

“We’re analyzing our options as well on what we could or couldn’t do to have the content rights work with [a cloud DVR],” Shaw said.

 

“The technology doesn’t scare me at all on it,” Shaw said of the cloud DVR. “It’s all of the other pieces … that have to fall in line to make that experience [work] the right way and to deliver the kind of experience that a customer would find exemplary.”

Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 18, 2014 8:50:20 AM
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ACE - Master

Thanks.  With Ericsson recently purchasing Mediaroom (the U-Verse platform), I think we may see some progress to a better, more robust U-Verse but Ericsson said it may be 3-5 years. Smiley Sad  Hopefully UV can do some things that don't need improvements to the platform, first.

Thanks.  With Ericsson recently purchasing Mediaroom (the U-Verse platform), I think we may see some progress to a better, more robust U-Verse but Ericsson said it may be 3-5 years. Smiley Sad  Hopefully UV can do some things that don't need improvements to the platform, first.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 18, 2014 12:14:48 PM
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I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 18, 2014 12:34:05 PM
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ACE - Expert

That Don Guy wrote:

...

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


They can block the authorization now.   Since I have only 3 TV's I'm not personally worried about the main limitation I see, which is that you have to have a stream for each TV watching anything, vs now recorded programs don't take a stream, and you can shift recordings to another broadcast time to manage that stream usage.

 


That Don Guy wrote:

...

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


They can block the authorization now.   Since I have only 3 TV's I'm not personally worried about the main limitation I see, which is that you have to have a stream for each TV watching anything, vs now recorded programs don't take a stream, and you can shift recordings to another broadcast time to manage that stream usage.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 18, 2014 12:53:04 PM
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ACE - Master

That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


Studio?  Maybe but I bet that AT&T will remove a recording on its own before anyone requests them to do so.  Basically I bet that recorded cloud shows would have a short life.  Hopefully one would have an option, to cloud or local record.  What AT&T might do, is like what the Hopper does.  ALL PT broadcast channels are recorded.  If you miss recording something or miss out on a new show that everyone is tweeting about, the next day, you can access it.  That would also eliminate the "no CBS VoD, everywhere" issue.


That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


Studio?  Maybe but I bet that AT&T will remove a recording on its own before anyone requests them to do so.  Basically I bet that recorded cloud shows would have a short life.  Hopefully one would have an option, to cloud or local record.  What AT&T might do, is like what the Hopper does.  ALL PT broadcast channels are recorded.  If you miss recording something or miss out on a new show that everyone is tweeting about, the next day, you can access it.  That would also eliminate the "no CBS VoD, everywhere" issue.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 19, 2014 8:05:31 AM
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That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


The other potential pitfall: what happens to recordings when a channel gets dropped? Even if it is just a short-term dispute, would we lose access to our recordings on those channels?

 

For example, there is still a watchable copy of a Hallmark program on our DVR from before the channel was dropped. Would we still be able to watch if we had a cloud DVR system instead?


That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


The other potential pitfall: what happens to recordings when a channel gets dropped? Even if it is just a short-term dispute, would we lose access to our recordings on those channels?

 

For example, there is still a watchable copy of a Hallmark program on our DVR from before the channel was dropped. Would we still be able to watch if we had a cloud DVR system instead?

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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Mar 19, 2014 9:59:30 AM
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ACE - Master

bailorg wrote:

That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


The other potential pitfall: what happens to recordings when a channel gets dropped? Even if it is just a short-term dispute, would we lose access to our recordings on those channels?

 

For example, there is still a watchable copy of a Hallmark program on our DVR from before the channel was dropped. Would we still be able to watch if we had a cloud DVR system instead?


I doubt that cloud recorded programs will have that long of a shelf life.   I hope that their direction is to for the system to record all prime time network TV (Fox, CBS, ABC, NBC) and that will free up local DVR room.


bailorg wrote:

That Don Guy wrote:

I am in two minds about a Cloud DVR.

 

Two obvious advantages: less worry about running out of space, and less chance that the signal would get corrupted before reaching the DVR.

 

One seemingly major disadvantage: it becomes much easier for AT&T to remove a recording at the request of a studio.

 


The other potential pitfall: what happens to recordings when a channel gets dropped? Even if it is just a short-term dispute, would we lose access to our recordings on those channels?

 

For example, there is still a watchable copy of a Hallmark program on our DVR from before the channel was dropped. Would we still be able to watch if we had a cloud DVR system instead?


I doubt that cloud recorded programs will have that long of a shelf life.   I hope that their direction is to for the system to record all prime time network TV (Fox, CBS, ABC, NBC) and that will free up local DVR room.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Whats Ahead for U-Verse? (Article, Cloud DVR)

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