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Posted Nov 21, 2013
11:21:45 PM
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The future of U-Verse Internet

Hi there,

 

In my area I was able to get 14,779 Kbps with the port speed of 18Mbps (or 18,000 Kbps).

I was getting more FEC and CRC errors after the port speed was switched from 12Mbps.

Still, 14,779 was not enough when three members of our family were watching something online, so we had to move to the cable provider who gave us 30Mbps for a little more money.

I wonder what is the future of U-Verse Internet, what is the maximum speed offered with this technology (I saw maximum at 24Mbps in other areas), so what is beyond that point when it is not enough? The cable company that I'm with right now is going to offer 100Mbps next year, Google Fiber is offering 1Gbps UP/DOWN in some small (for now) areas, but expanding. So what is AT&T's move for the future (5-10 years from now, let's say) when 4K content is going to be a normal trend?

 

Thank you!

Hi there,

 

In my area I was able to get 14,779 Kbps with the port speed of 18Mbps (or 18,000 Kbps).

I was getting more FEC and CRC errors after the port speed was switched from 12Mbps.

Still, 14,779 was not enough when three members of our family were watching something online, so we had to move to the cable provider who gave us 30Mbps for a little more money.

I wonder what is the future of U-Verse Internet, what is the maximum speed offered with this technology (I saw maximum at 24Mbps in other areas), so what is beyond that point when it is not enough? The cable company that I'm with right now is going to offer 100Mbps next year, Google Fiber is offering 1Gbps UP/DOWN in some small (for now) areas, but expanding. So what is AT&T's move for the future (5-10 years from now, let's say) when 4K content is going to be a normal trend?

 

Thank you!

The future of U-Verse Internet

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Nov 22, 2013 5:41:50 AM
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Edited by my thoughts on Nov 22, 2013 at 5:47:13 AM

see next post

see next post

*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: The future of U-Verse Internet

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Nov 22, 2013 5:44:35 AM
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For those with ability to have 24M should now be able to order POWER (bonded 45M internet).

Future....the 300 will only be those on FTTP such as being deployed in Austin.

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r28751077-New-Plans-300-Mbps-150-Mbps-100-Mbps-and-75-Mbps-and-Prici...

Google after 4 years is still only in one area, with 3 other amnounced http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Four-Years-Later-Just-How-Big-is-Google-Fibers-Impact-126717
For those with ability to have 24M should now be able to order POWER (bonded 45M internet).

Future....the 300 will only be those on FTTP such as being deployed in Austin.

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r28751077-New-Plans-300-Mbps-150-Mbps-100-Mbps-and-75-Mbps-and-Pricing-

Google after 4 years is still only in one area, with 3 other amnounced http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Four-Years-Later-Just-How-Big-is-Google-Fibers-Impact-126717
*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

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Nov 22, 2013 8:25:01 AM
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ACE - Master

I only have 12Mbps service at home and at any one time I have no less than 3 and as many as 6 wireless devices connected 3 streaming Netflix and the other three surfing, while watching / recording 2 and sometimes 3 HD streams and I have no issues with our service.  Even with all that going my average download speed on both speakeasy.net and speedtest.net are 11.5Mbps.  

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway

I only have 12Mbps service at home and at any one time I have no less than 3 and as many as 6 wireless devices connected 3 streaming Netflix and the other three surfing, while watching / recording 2 and sometimes 3 HD streams and I have no issues with our service.  Even with all that going my average download speed on both speakeasy.net and speedtest.net are 11.5Mbps.  

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2013 7:50:53 AM
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Google is starting its infrastructure from scratch.  The phone and cable companies have a lot of existing infrastructure and right of way and are preventing many municipalities from starting their own.  Japan and South Korea already had 50 Mbps & 100 Mbps about a decade ago.

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?

Google is starting its infrastructure from scratch.  The phone and cable companies have a lot of existing infrastructure and right of way and are preventing many municipalities from starting their own.  Japan and South Korea already had 50 Mbps & 100 Mbps about a decade ago.

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?

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Nov 25, 2013 9:52:18 AM
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ACE - Expert

24 Mbps down has 3 Mbps up.   I don't know that I've seen the upstream speed for 45 Mbps.

 

24 Mbps down has 3 Mbps up.   I don't know that I've seen the upstream speed for 45 Mbps.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2013 11:16:03 AM
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You're right, the problem might not reside in capacity. While Netflix says you need 5 Mbps to stream HD content (and I think they mean 1080, not 720 - https://support.netflix.com/en/node/306), their player is capable of changing the stream quality dynamically, so when it's not enough bandwidth, the player will switch to the lower quality that requires lower speed. Everybody will enjoy smooth streaming unless there is a line problem and the modem has to re-train and you start getting dropped frames. My modem statistics showed many FEC/CRC errors and errored minutes, as well as 802.1x issues when modem was trying to re-connect and I had to wait sometimes up to 30 minutes, which was all reported to the support rep. Guess what support rep did last time. She just reset my modem completely so I lost all my firewall and NAT rules I set for games and remote connection, list of all MAC addresses who had access to my WiFi, so I said "Ok, that's enough!". She supposed to understand that if I had so many FEC/CRC errors, she had to forward my request to Tier 2 support and maybe I needed a technician on site to check my line. She was not able to pinpoint the problem. It's like you got a malware on your computer and I come to your house and just re-format your hard drive. Problem solved! Nope, you'll get malware tomorrow, because you don't have antivirus, not using OpenDNS or not educated enough to avoid visiting malicious web sites.

 

 

Anyway, instead of my line being checked for problems, I was offered a higher port speed, which didn't work and even got worse (on a bad line higher speed shows higher error rate). And this is only one part of the problem. Another part of the problem was the speed. Sometimes I upload stuff like HD videos, and it takes forever (only 1 Mbps up which is 100KB/s roughly), so I was forced to go with a different provider after being AT&T customer since 2005. I know the difference between having a dedicated DSL line and share the cable with other apartments and I always appreciated and recommended U-Verse to my friends, but 12/1 Mbps is just too slow nowadays when 4k is already available (on YouTube, for example, try to watch this in Original resolution: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6eaVeYXOs, don't ask why, I enjoy crystal clear quality and on my 1080p plasma any 4K video looks much better than 1080p video. It's like when you take a picture with 5MP camera and 24MP camera and compare them on the same monitor - you'll notice the difference right away). When multiple people want to watch HD videos at the same time or share HD quality footage, 12Mbps is not going to work. With the new provider (TWC, which I was sceptical about), whenever I test my speed, I'm always getting about 34Mbps down and above 5Mbps up, which is three times faster than U-Verse for only $10 more. Without dropped frames, even in 4K. Downloading files now takes much less time and speeds get up to 4MB/s, uploading up to 700KB/s (depends on content compression capability). Too bad AT&T has no any plans for deploying FTTH in Los Angeles any time soon. Funny thing, when there is LTE on my phone, it's faster than my home Internet sometimes. I even witnessed 62.69/14.32 Mbps in one areaI just cannot recommend AT&T U-Verse over cable anymore, unless there are no other options or not enough capacity for cable customers.

You're right, the problem might not reside in capacity. While Netflix says you need 5 Mbps to stream HD content (and I think they mean 1080, not 720 - https://support.netflix.com/en/node/306), their player is capable of changing the stream quality dynamically, so when it's not enough bandwidth, the player will switch to the lower quality that requires lower speed. Everybody will enjoy smooth streaming unless there is a line problem and the modem has to re-train and you start getting dropped frames. My modem statistics showed many FEC/CRC errors and errored minutes, as well as 802.1x issues when modem was trying to re-connect and I had to wait sometimes up to 30 minutes, which was all reported to the support rep. Guess what support rep did last time. She just reset my modem completely so I lost all my firewall and NAT rules I set for games and remote connection, list of all MAC addresses who had access to my WiFi, so I said "Ok, that's enough!". She supposed to understand that if I had so many FEC/CRC errors, she had to forward my request to Tier 2 support and maybe I needed a technician on site to check my line. She was not able to pinpoint the problem. It's like you got a malware on your computer and I come to your house and just re-format your hard drive. Problem solved! Nope, you'll get malware tomorrow, because you don't have antivirus, not using OpenDNS or not educated enough to avoid visiting malicious web sites.

 

 

Anyway, instead of my line being checked for problems, I was offered a higher port speed, which didn't work and even got worse (on a bad line higher speed shows higher error rate). And this is only one part of the problem. Another part of the problem was the speed. Sometimes I upload stuff like HD videos, and it takes forever (only 1 Mbps up which is 100KB/s roughly), so I was forced to go with a different provider after being AT&T customer since 2005. I know the difference between having a dedicated DSL line and share the cable with other apartments and I always appreciated and recommended U-Verse to my friends, but 12/1 Mbps is just too slow nowadays when 4k is already available (on YouTube, for example, try to watch this in Original resolution: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6eaVeYXOs, don't ask why, I enjoy crystal clear quality and on my 1080p plasma any 4K video looks much better than 1080p video. It's like when you take a picture with 5MP camera and 24MP camera and compare them on the same monitor - you'll notice the difference right away). When multiple people want to watch HD videos at the same time or share HD quality footage, 12Mbps is not going to work. With the new provider (TWC, which I was sceptical about), whenever I test my speed, I'm always getting about 34Mbps down and above 5Mbps up, which is three times faster than U-Verse for only $10 more. Without dropped frames, even in 4K. Downloading files now takes much less time and speeds get up to 4MB/s, uploading up to 700KB/s (depends on content compression capability). Too bad AT&T has no any plans for deploying FTTH in Los Angeles any time soon. Funny thing, when there is LTE on my phone, it's faster than my home Internet sometimes. I even witnessed 62.69/14.32 Mbps in one areaI just cannot recommend AT&T U-Verse over cable anymore, unless there are no other options or not enough capacity for cable customers.

Re: The future of U-Verse Internet

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Nov 27, 2013 12:30:18 PM
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willchen wrote:

Google is starting its infrastructure from scratch.  The phone and cable companies have a lot of existing infrastructure and right of way and are preventing many municipalities from starting their own.  Japan and South Korea already had 50 Mbps & 100 Mbps about a decade ago.

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?


The upload speed for 45.0 Mbps is 6.0 Mbps.


willchen wrote:

Google is starting its infrastructure from scratch.  The phone and cable companies have a lot of existing infrastructure and right of way and are preventing many municipalities from starting their own.  Japan and South Korea already had 50 Mbps & 100 Mbps about a decade ago.

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?


The upload speed for 45.0 Mbps is 6.0 Mbps.

*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: The future of U-Verse Internet

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Nov 27, 2013 5:06:03 PM
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Hi, x0rg:

 

Somewhat off topic, but I did want to address your concerns over 4k communications via an ISP (whether that's AT&T or anyone else).

 

You do realize that 4k is such a different technology for broadcasters that most would effectively have to replace all of their equipment (e.g.: cameras, viewfinders, potentially camera control unit (shading), switchers, etc.) just to handle the bandwidth and resolution?

 

Understand that most of the alphabet soup of broadcast facilities (e.g.: ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, etc.) haven't even fully upgraded to 1080p at this point. Most of the time, it's purely cinematographers who're now dabbling with 4k (and in certain cases, 8k) format.

 

This is all to say that unless you're a hard-core videographer who absolutely needs seriously large upload speeds, you're probably going to want to go after something significantly more specialized than consumer-grade broadband.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

-Phil

(Amateur volunteer camera director for a religious institution in the Atlanta metro area that's been shooting productions in 720p for 6 years)


x0rg wrote:

Hi there,

 

In my area I was able to get 14,779 Kbps with the port speed of 18Mbps (or 18,000 Kbps).

I was getting more FEC and CRC errors after the port speed was switched from 12Mbps.

Still, 14,779 was not enough when three members of our family were watching something online, so we had to move to the cable provider who gave us 30Mbps for a little more money.

I wonder what is the future of U-Verse Internet, what is the maximum speed offered with this technology (I saw maximum at 24Mbps in other areas), so what is beyond that point when it is not enough? The cable company that I'm with right now is going to offer 100Mbps next year, Google Fiber is offering 1Gbps UP/DOWN in some small (for now) areas, but expanding. So what is AT&T's move for the future (5-10 years from now, let's say) when 4K content is going to be a normal trend?

 

Thank you!




Hi, x0rg:

 

Somewhat off topic, but I did want to address your concerns over 4k communications via an ISP (whether that's AT&T or anyone else).

 

You do realize that 4k is such a different technology for broadcasters that most would effectively have to replace all of their equipment (e.g.: cameras, viewfinders, potentially camera control unit (shading), switchers, etc.) just to handle the bandwidth and resolution?

 

Understand that most of the alphabet soup of broadcast facilities (e.g.: ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, etc.) haven't even fully upgraded to 1080p at this point. Most of the time, it's purely cinematographers who're now dabbling with 4k (and in certain cases, 8k) format.

 

This is all to say that unless you're a hard-core videographer who absolutely needs seriously large upload speeds, you're probably going to want to go after something significantly more specialized than consumer-grade broadband.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

-Phil

(Amateur volunteer camera director for a religious institution in the Atlanta metro area that's been shooting productions in 720p for 6 years)


x0rg wrote:

Hi there,

 

In my area I was able to get 14,779 Kbps with the port speed of 18Mbps (or 18,000 Kbps).

I was getting more FEC and CRC errors after the port speed was switched from 12Mbps.

Still, 14,779 was not enough when three members of our family were watching something online, so we had to move to the cable provider who gave us 30Mbps for a little more money.

I wonder what is the future of U-Verse Internet, what is the maximum speed offered with this technology (I saw maximum at 24Mbps in other areas), so what is beyond that point when it is not enough? The cable company that I'm with right now is going to offer 100Mbps next year, Google Fiber is offering 1Gbps UP/DOWN in some small (for now) areas, but expanding. So what is AT&T's move for the future (5-10 years from now, let's say) when 4K content is going to be a normal trend?

 

Thank you!




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Nov 27, 2013 8:07:39 PM
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ACE - Master

willchen wrote:

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?


My 12 Mbps has 1.5 upload, which I get with no issues, the 24 Mbps has 3.0 upload speeds and the 45 Mbps has 6.0 upload speeds.

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway

willchen wrote:

 

AT&T is mainly offering Assymetrical lines.  The 6MBps & 12 MBbps ADSL2 download speeds are accompanied by less than 1 Mbps upload speeds.  It prevents real technology breakthroughs.  What upload speeds are available on the 24 Mbps offering and the bonded 45 Mbps offerings?


My 12 Mbps has 1.5 upload, which I get with no issues, the 24 Mbps has 3.0 upload speeds and the 45 Mbps has 6.0 upload speeds.

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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