One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

Contributor

One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

I am trying to relocate my residential gateway from the study to the living room.  In the living room, I only have one coaxial outlet.  Can I connect the Residential Gateway using the coaxial outlet and then connect the receiver using ethernet cable or usb cable at the back of the Residential Gateway?  I also want to relieve the DHCP assignment duty from the Residential Gateway and let a standalone wireless router takes care of that.  Do you all see any problems?  I have minimal knowledge about networking, so pardon me if this doesn't make sense at all.  Below is a summary of how I want to set it up.

 

Thanks, Brian

 

 

Coaxial ->  RG ->  Ethernet -> Receiver

                                             -> Wireless Router -> Powerline Adap. -> Comp1 (Ethernet)

                                                                             -> Xbox (Ethernet)

                                                                              -> Smart TV (Ethernet)

                                                                              -> Tablets (Wireless)

Message 1 of 6 (1,153 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

[ Edited ]

giggsyboy wrote:

I am trying to relocate my residential gateway from the study to the living room.  In the living room, I only have one coaxial outlet.  Can I connect the Residential Gateway using the coaxial outlet and then connect the receiver using ethernet cable or usb cable at the back of the Residential Gateway? ...



Maybe.

 

How is the RG currently connected to the NID?  If by Coax, continue...

 

Can you map out your entire coax network in your house, Include all spliters and duplexors?  It may be possible to change the "direction" of a diplexor and do what you want.

 

HOWEVER, the RG must provide the DHCP duty for your DVR/STBs.  You can shift that duty for other devices IF you can isolate them behind your router.  There are other posts that help with doing that, for example see post 2 in this thread.

 

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 2 of 6 (1,145 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

giggsyboy - How about a similar sketch of how it is currently wired.

You say the RG is fed COAX. But no STB/TVs fed COAX?? If that is the case, you have a direct COAX connection from the NID to the RG. When you move the RG you want to replicate that connection - direct with no barrel connectors.

The rest sounds OK except the DHCP. The RG must hand out DHCP. Any addl devices must be unmanaged e.g. a switch or dumbed down routers.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 3 of 6 (1,141 Views)
Employee

Re: One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

The preferred and I suspect your current installation is on cat.
If your unable or desire not to mess with, may request a tech visit to move RG.
Expected charges on a move order...standard service call $99, each new wire run needed $55 per run.
Minimum charge with running cat5 to outlet, $154. If tech will do move as desired on coax $99 providing not having to run coax from splitter to NID.
Employee Contributor*
*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinions.
Message 4 of 6 (1,109 Views)
Contributor

Re: One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

No, all other receivers are COAX connection, so it sounds like I can't just move the RG from one COAX outlet in the house to another COAX without a technician?

 

The RG must hand out DHCP because of the TV..  Is that why people connecting to another router needs to have a different IP range so that the RG and router can each their own territories?  

 

Or is there any cheap devices (not professional type) that I can figure out interference?  I tried to undo the security console or motion sensors but no luck isolating the problem.

 

Thanks all for your input!

Message 5 of 6 (1,087 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: One coaxial outlet for Residential Gateway and Receiver

giggsyboy - Re: No, all other receivers are COAX connection, so it sounds like I can't just move the RG from one COAX outlet in the house to another COAX without a technician?

No, you can still do it. Jeffer touched on this config.

Somewhere, you have a diplexer and a splitter to distribute to the other TVs
The diplexer has three connections - NID, combined,TVs - The combined goes to the RG.
Find the termination on the splitter for the cable that goes to the new location. Move that termination to combined & connect the cable that is now on combined to the splitter previously occupied by the new location.

You will have moved the RG feed to the new location & the old location is now just another TV.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 6 of 6 (1,082 Views)
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