DVR whole house competition

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DVR whole house competition

Xfinity (Comcast Cable) is advertising in my area that their whole house DVR can record 5 HD shows and watch a 6th show at the same time.  Does anyone know if Uverse is going to keep up with competition?

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Re: DVR whole house competition


dhascall wrote:

Denver_1 wrote:

Xfinity (Comcast Cable) is advertising in my area that their whole house DVR can record 5 HD shows and watch a 6th show at the same time.  Does anyone know if Uverse is going to keep up with competition?


When it comes to stream count alone, when U-Verse rolls out its new profile, it will again be the stream king, upping Comcast by at least one.


We will still only be able to record 3 hd shows at once.

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Steven- wrote:

We will still only be able to record 3 hd shows at once.


Your source?

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Re: DVR whole house competition

[ Edited ]

The DVR box.
They would have to switch them out to be able to record more than that. The 3 HD + 1 SD is a hardware limitation, not a bandwidth one.

I can already watch 4 HD shows, but still can't record more than 3.

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Re: DVR whole house competition


Steven- wrote:

 

The DVR box.

They would have to switch them out to be able to record more than that. The 3 HD + 1 SD is a hardware limitation, not a bandwidth one.

I can already watch 4 HD shows, but still can't record more than 3.


No, not true.  At one time you could only receive and record 1 HD stream.  The it changed to 2 HD streams.  Later it changed to 3 HD streams, and now we can receive up to 4 HD streams.  All changes occurred without any hardware changes.  The 3 HD stream + 1 SD stream is not a hardware limitation.

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Re: DVR whole house competition


texasguy37 wrote:

Steven- wrote:

 

The DVR box.

They would have to switch them out to be able to record more than that. The 3 HD + 1 SD is a hardware limitation, not a bandwidth one.

I can already watch 4 HD shows, but still can't record more than 3.


No, not true.  At one time you could only receive and record 1 HD stream.  The it changed to 2 HD streams.  Later it changed to 3 HD streams, and now we can receive up to 4 HD streams.  All changes occurred without any hardware changes.  The 3 HD stream + 1 SD stream is not a hardware limitation.


Agreed.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
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Re: DVR whole house competition

[ Edited ]

texasguy37 wrote:

No, not true.  At one time you could only receive and record 1 HD stream.  The it changed to 2 HD streams.  Later it changed to 3 HD streams, and now we can receive up to 4 HD streams.  All changes occurred without any hardware changes.  The 3 HD stream + 1 SD stream is not a hardware limitation.


When it changed to 2 HD streams, could you record 2 HD shows(I'm assuming yes)? Then when it changed to 3 HD streams, could you record 3 HD shows(again, I'm assuming yes)? Now that it's 4, you can still only record 3. If it's not a hardware limitation, why can you watch 4 HD shows, but not record 4?

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Re: DVR whole house competition

It's not a hardware limitation.

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Re: DVR whole house competition

[ Edited ]

texasguy37 wrote:

It's not a hardware limitation.


That's not an answer.

It seems like your answer would be; "AT&T just thought it would be a good idea to do it that way."

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Re: DVR whole house competition

At some point, every device has hardware limitations. However, in this case, the limit is not on the number of streams, but rather the bandwidth.

3HD + 1SD streams is about 20 Mbps of bandwidth. Now, does the DVR have a 20 Mbps limit somewhere in the hardware chain (network hardware, network driver, CPU, bus, SATA controller, hard drive) ? Maybe, maybe not.

But the fact remains that if AT&T were to get new encoders that reduced the bandwidth of a stream, then perhaps 4HD, or 4HD + 2SD, or some other higher stream combination will now fit within 20 Mbps. Such a configuration would be fully supported by the DVR.

So, in summary:

A) No one knows for sure if the current configuration of 3HD + 1SD is near a hardware limit, nor what that hardware limit actually is.
B) If there is such a limit, the limit is not the number of streams, but rather the bandwidth. This enables the possibility of more streams if their individual bandwidth goes down in the future.

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Re: DVR whole house competition

[ Edited ]

Does anyone remember the 7 stream profile (4 SD/3 HD) that was released by mistake to some customers last year?  All 7 streams were recordable.  

 

SomeJoe, how much bandwidth would you calcuate would be in use during those 7 recordings?

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Re: DVR whole house competition

Full ingress load on 3HD + 4SD would be 3 * 5.7 + 4 * 1.8 = 24.3 Mbps.

One thing that does have to be added in when determining whether a hardware limit would be violated is the egress profile. Other STBs watching live or recorded video add bandwidth to both the hard drive and the network interface.

At current limitations, if you're recording 3HD + 1SD, and 3 other STBs in the house are watching 3HD (live, delayed, or recorded), then the total bandwidth load on the DVR's network interface and hard drive is:

3 * 5.7 + 1 * 1.8 + 3 * 5.7 = 36 Mbps. This is well within a good hard drive's capabilities, but the component that's really stressed in this situation is the 100 Mbps network interface, especially on HPNA/coax.

If this was happening with a 3HD+4SD profile, then the total bandwidth could conceivably be 3 * 5.7 + 4 * 1.8 + 3 * 5.7 = 41.4 Mbps.
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Re: DVR whole house competition

[ Edited ]

SomeJoe7777 wrote:
3HD + 1SD streams is about 20 Mbps of bandwidth.


AT&T's HD streams only use 5.7 Mbps? Wiki says it's 8-15 Mbps using MPEG-4, and 25 Mbps using MPEG-2. No wonder people used to complain about the HD quality not being HD. Supposedly the quality is better now, so what did the bit rate used to be?

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Re: DVR whole house competition


texasguy37 wrote:

Does anyone remember the 7 stream profile (4 SD/3 HD) that was released by mistake to some customers last year?  All 7 streams were recordable.  

 

SomeJoe, how much bandwidth would you calcuate would be in use during those 7 recordings?


It says nothing in that thread about him being able to record all the streams. It says he set 3 HD streams to record, then set the STBs to SD channels...

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Steven- wrote:

It says nothing in that thread about him being able to record all the streams. It says he set 3 HD streams to record, then set the STBs to SD channels...


No, the Ingress profile determines the combination of the recordable streams.  All 7 streams (4 SD and 3 HD) were recordable.  I remember the whole discussions last year when this profile appeared!  It was not just this one thread that I posted.

 

Also, there used to be a 5 SD profile.  All 5 SD streams were recordable.

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SomeJoe7777 wrote:
Full ingress load on 3HD + 4SD would be 3 * 5.7 + 4 * 1.8 = 24.3 Mbps.

One thing that does have to be added in when determining whether a hardware limit would be violated is the egress profile. Other STBs watching live or recorded video add bandwidth to both the hard drive and the network interface.

At current limitations, if you're recording 3HD + 1SD, and 3 other STBs in the house are watching 3HD (live, delayed, or recorded), then the total bandwidth load on the DVR's network interface and hard drive is:

3 * 5.7 + 1 * 1.8 + 3 * 5.7 = 36 Mbps. This is well within a good hard drive's capabilities, but the component that's really stressed in this situation is the 100 Mbps network interface, especially on HPNA/coax.

If this was happening with a 3HD+4SD profile, then the total bandwidth could conceivably be 3 * 5.7 + 4 * 1.8 + 3 * 5.7 = 41.4 Mbps.

Based on that, would you say that the ability to record 4 HD streams at the same time would be within those bandwidth limits?

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