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Posted Sep 19, 2010
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does uverse work with cat6?

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does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 19, 2010 11:59:55 AM
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ACE - Expert

It does, but prem techs generally don't carry any equipment/supplies for cat6, all have everything necessary for cat5e. :smileywink:


Chris

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It does, but prem techs generally don't carry any equipment/supplies for cat6, all have everything necessary for cat5e. :smileywink:


Chris

__________________________________________________________________________

Please NO SD stretch-o-vision or 480 SD HD Channels
1-866-465-1496 for direct TS to avoid Mr. Voice recognition
Your Results May Vary, In My Humble Opinion
I Call It Like I See It, Simply a U-verse user, nothing more

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 19, 2010 12:03:05 PM
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I'm going to wire my house with cat6 and just want to make sure it's not going to cause any problems with the STBs

I'm going to wire my house with cat6 and just want to make sure it's not going to cause any problems with the STBs

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 19, 2010 12:14:12 PM
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ACE - Expert

As I mentioned above, you will have to terminate all ends as the prem techs do not carry cat 6 connectors.  Cat 5e can carry upto 1G over 100m, cat 6 is unnecessary, overkill. :smileywink:


Chris

___________________________________________________________________________

Please NO SD stretch-o-vision or 480 SD HD Channels
1-866-465-1496 for direct TS to avoid Mr. Voice recognition
Your Results May Vary, In My Humble Opinion
I Call It Like I See It, Simply a U-verse user, nothing more

As I mentioned above, you will have to terminate all ends as the prem techs do not carry cat 6 connectors.  Cat 5e can carry upto 1G over 100m, cat 6 is unnecessary, overkill. :smileywink:


Chris

___________________________________________________________________________

Please NO SD stretch-o-vision or 480 SD HD Channels
1-866-465-1496 for direct TS to avoid Mr. Voice recognition
Your Results May Vary, In My Humble Opinion
I Call It Like I See It, Simply a U-verse user, nothing more

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 20, 2010 1:59:08 PM
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CAT 6 is suppossed to be backwards compatable with CAT5e. The connectors likely have the same pin-out, they could be speced differently, but that shouldn't matter, because its backwards compatible.  I think the main difference is the wire gauge/insulation. According to this wiki, the connector could also be thicker, so it may not plug into the STB. There are adaptors for that, but the adaptors could cause issues. 

 

However, you could have the tech wire the CAT6 cables with CAT5e connectors. When you you are ready to go to CAT6 in the future, all you need to do is change out the connectors, which is an easy task for someone that does it all the time. I can do it, but it takes me forever cause I don't do it all the time.

 

I would make sure the same number of wires are in both CAT5 and CAT6 and make sure they are color coded the same. If that turns out to be the case, there is probably not much to worry about.

 

Here is a starting place for futher research.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable

CAT 6 is suppossed to be backwards compatable with CAT5e. The connectors likely have the same pin-out, they could be speced differently, but that shouldn't matter, because its backwards compatible.  I think the main difference is the wire gauge/insulation. According to this wiki, the connector could also be thicker, so it may not plug into the STB. There are adaptors for that, but the adaptors could cause issues. 

 

However, you could have the tech wire the CAT6 cables with CAT5e connectors. When you you are ready to go to CAT6 in the future, all you need to do is change out the connectors, which is an easy task for someone that does it all the time. I can do it, but it takes me forever cause I don't do it all the time.

 

I would make sure the same number of wires are in both CAT5 and CAT6 and make sure they are color coded the same. If that turns out to be the case, there is probably not much to worry about.

 

Here is a starting place for futher research.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 20, 2010 3:08:16 PM
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ACE - Expert

Or just wire house with Cat5 cable and avoid all of the possible issues.

Or just wire house with Cat5 cable and avoid all of the possible issues.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 21, 2010 7:41:30 AM
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We use Cat6 all the time at work in a mixed Cat6/Cat5e environment.  It is backward compatible with Cat5e.  If it was me I would install Cat6 in my house to be able to take advantage of future network speed increases, 100MHz vs 200MHz.  Here is a brief article on Cat6 vs Cat5e that might help.

 

http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html

We use Cat6 all the time at work in a mixed Cat6/Cat5e environment.  It is backward compatible with Cat5e.  If it was me I would install Cat6 in my house to be able to take advantage of future network speed increases, 100MHz vs 200MHz.  Here is a brief article on Cat6 vs Cat5e that might help.

 

http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 22, 2010 11:33:15 AM
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Yes and No, is more acccurate answer, their are several issues to contend with

 

1. If the logic is to get 'PURE' cat6 wire gigE  ability from uverse system, that answer is "NO"

2. If you have limited areas of use and just need better shielding cable for selected spots then cat6 "yes"

 

answer 1 no = Why ? The core underlying reason has nothing to do with cable types, AT&T current Residential Gateway they offer the 3800 model, only supports 10/100, so using cat6 when those ports are rated for cat5e wont make it go any faster using cat6.  This is purely an AT&T hardware issue, has nothing to do with what type of cables you choose to use at home.

 

 

answer 2 yes = Why ? Cat6 can be used for single point connections from the residential gateway. aka gateway to a computer or gateway to a STB.  Note alot of installations have 2 port wall jacks, which means its cat5e, as cat5e can be split 1 to run the STB and 1 for computer at a designated location.  1 wall wire split to a 2 port wall jack for 2 feeds. 

 

Cat5e uses 4 wires, so splitting the 8 wire cable is perfectly fine to carry 2 signals to the gateway over the single wall wire. Cat6 uses all 8 wires for a single connection and is not splitable, so be carefull in doing your own wall jack splits attemps with cat6 wont get you cat6.  You can use the cat6 cable, but it will be cat5e in use due to the wire split limitations of cat6 vs cat5 for carrying 2 signals vs 1 over a single wire.

 

Also another big thing most dont understand or never look at in this consideration.  I've seen alot of folks attempt to cat6 their home but wonder why they dont get cat6 anyways. 

 

This step is missed every time people talk about cat6 in their home 99% of those grey telco boxes stuck to the sides of most normal homes are cat5/cat3 phone coax wire schemes. At&T techs dont carry cat6 and or do external wires from pole to grey telco box to inside home to the gateway are all cat5e/cat3 phne coax cables as well, even if you run cat6 in your walls. 

 

To get a telco tech to re-wire your phone pole to grey telco box to your gatewy as cat6 also is not easy to get done, most are not allowed to do that, so its not possible unless you know someone with those telco box skills to rewire it cat6 their for you also.  I did my home external as cat6 when they did the primarry install for outside, so it can work cat6 grade once at&t releases a gigE 2wire residential gateway vs the 4 port 10/100 they use now.

 

Also another big note, using cat6 invalidates technical support if you ever have wiring problems due to cat6 is not part of their instalation service agreement.  So if someting wire wise breaks, they wont help you for that or fix it, unless you pay for a re-wire to their standards, so look at that potential as well if you decide to go cat6 you will need to maintain the cables yourself at additional costs and outside of at&t wire services.

Yes and No, is more acccurate answer, their are several issues to contend with

 

1. If the logic is to get 'PURE' cat6 wire gigE  ability from uverse system, that answer is "NO"

2. If you have limited areas of use and just need better shielding cable for selected spots then cat6 "yes"

 

answer 1 no = Why ? The core underlying reason has nothing to do with cable types, AT&T current Residential Gateway they offer the 3800 model, only supports 10/100, so using cat6 when those ports are rated for cat5e wont make it go any faster using cat6.  This is purely an AT&T hardware issue, has nothing to do with what type of cables you choose to use at home.

 

 

answer 2 yes = Why ? Cat6 can be used for single point connections from the residential gateway. aka gateway to a computer or gateway to a STB.  Note alot of installations have 2 port wall jacks, which means its cat5e, as cat5e can be split 1 to run the STB and 1 for computer at a designated location.  1 wall wire split to a 2 port wall jack for 2 feeds. 

 

Cat5e uses 4 wires, so splitting the 8 wire cable is perfectly fine to carry 2 signals to the gateway over the single wall wire. Cat6 uses all 8 wires for a single connection and is not splitable, so be carefull in doing your own wall jack splits attemps with cat6 wont get you cat6.  You can use the cat6 cable, but it will be cat5e in use due to the wire split limitations of cat6 vs cat5 for carrying 2 signals vs 1 over a single wire.

 

Also another big thing most dont understand or never look at in this consideration.  I've seen alot of folks attempt to cat6 their home but wonder why they dont get cat6 anyways. 

 

This step is missed every time people talk about cat6 in their home 99% of those grey telco boxes stuck to the sides of most normal homes are cat5/cat3 phone coax wire schemes. At&T techs dont carry cat6 and or do external wires from pole to grey telco box to inside home to the gateway are all cat5e/cat3 phne coax cables as well, even if you run cat6 in your walls. 

 

To get a telco tech to re-wire your phone pole to grey telco box to your gatewy as cat6 also is not easy to get done, most are not allowed to do that, so its not possible unless you know someone with those telco box skills to rewire it cat6 their for you also.  I did my home external as cat6 when they did the primarry install for outside, so it can work cat6 grade once at&t releases a gigE 2wire residential gateway vs the 4 port 10/100 they use now.

 

Also another big note, using cat6 invalidates technical support if you ever have wiring problems due to cat6 is not part of their instalation service agreement.  So if someting wire wise breaks, they wont help you for that or fix it, unless you pay for a re-wire to their standards, so look at that potential as well if you decide to go cat6 you will need to maintain the cables yourself at additional costs and outside of at&t wire services.

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 22, 2010 12:36:41 PM
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Are they able to tell remotely if you have installed Cat 6?  Or you're saying if they come to the prem, it will be discovered and not supported?

Are they able to tell remotely if you have installed Cat 6?  Or you're saying if they come to the prem, it will be discovered and not supported?

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 22, 2010 4:16:52 PM
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The reason they will not support it is they don't have the tools or ends to make the repairs and maintain the cable at cat6 standards. Think of it as if the customer had installed fiber in place of copper wire. If the customer wants to supply the end conversion equipment from wire to fiber then more power to the customer but if the fiber breaks the tech can not fix it.

In this case if the customer wants to make the terminations and maintain the cables he is welcome to use them. If he wants the technician to terminate them they will become cat 5 rated cables. The tech will fix and support any thing except the cables. You can not tell if it is cat 5e, 6 or 7. I may even be hard visually without a label or being told that it is a cat6 cable.

 

The main advantage to using the cat 6 is to future proof the physical part of the network. If equipment comes out with the need for higher transmission rates then the cables will not need to be replaced.

The reason they will not support it is they don't have the tools or ends to make the repairs and maintain the cable at cat6 standards. Think of it as if the customer had installed fiber in place of copper wire. If the customer wants to supply the end conversion equipment from wire to fiber then more power to the customer but if the fiber breaks the tech can not fix it.

In this case if the customer wants to make the terminations and maintain the cables he is welcome to use them. If he wants the technician to terminate them they will become cat 5 rated cables. The tech will fix and support any thing except the cables. You can not tell if it is cat 5e, 6 or 7. I may even be hard visually without a label or being told that it is a cat6 cable.

 

The main advantage to using the cat 6 is to future proof the physical part of the network. If equipment comes out with the need for higher transmission rates then the cables will not need to be replaced.

*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 23, 2010 1:42:38 PM
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Escapee wrote:

The reason they will not support it is they don't have the tools or ends to make the repairs and maintain the cable at cat6 standards. Think of it as if the customer had installed fiber in place of copper wire. If the customer wants to supply the end conversion equipment from wire to fiber then more power to the customer but if the fiber breaks the tech can not fix it.

In this case if the customer wants to make the terminations and maintain the cables he is welcome to use them. If he wants the technician to terminate them they will become cat 5 rated cables. The tech will fix and support any thing except the cables. You can not tell if it is cat 5e, 6 or 7. I may even be hard visually without a label or being told that it is a cat6 cable.

 

The main advantage to using the cat 6 is to future proof the physical part of the network. If equipment comes out with the need for higher transmission rates then the cables will not need to be replaced.


This is very good advice, though I would like to correct one thing, there is a noticable difference between CAT5/e CAT6, and CAT7, to prevent extra crosstalk (and to support higher speeds because of it), CAT6 does have a 4 way separator seperating the pairs (looks like a + going through the cable), the 4 way separator makes the cable a little more thicker and sturdier, allowing you to tell the difference between CAT5/e and CAT6/a, as for CAT 7, being that each pair is shielded separately, the twists in the pairs don't protrude from the outer jacket causing those bumps you usually see on twisted pair cabling (at least as far as I have noticed), resulting in a smoother jacket 


Escapee wrote:

The reason they will not support it is they don't have the tools or ends to make the repairs and maintain the cable at cat6 standards. Think of it as if the customer had installed fiber in place of copper wire. If the customer wants to supply the end conversion equipment from wire to fiber then more power to the customer but if the fiber breaks the tech can not fix it.

In this case if the customer wants to make the terminations and maintain the cables he is welcome to use them. If he wants the technician to terminate them they will become cat 5 rated cables. The tech will fix and support any thing except the cables. You can not tell if it is cat 5e, 6 or 7. I may even be hard visually without a label or being told that it is a cat6 cable.

 

The main advantage to using the cat 6 is to future proof the physical part of the network. If equipment comes out with the need for higher transmission rates then the cables will not need to be replaced.


This is very good advice, though I would like to correct one thing, there is a noticable difference between CAT5/e CAT6, and CAT7, to prevent extra crosstalk (and to support higher speeds because of it), CAT6 does have a 4 way separator seperating the pairs (looks like a + going through the cable), the 4 way separator makes the cable a little more thicker and sturdier, allowing you to tell the difference between CAT5/e and CAT6/a, as for CAT 7, being that each pair is shielded separately, the twists in the pairs don't protrude from the outer jacket causing those bumps you usually see on twisted pair cabling (at least as far as I have noticed), resulting in a smoother jacket 

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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Sep 25, 2010 10:16:00 PM
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kooldog wrote:

 

Cat5e uses 4 wires, so splitting the 8 wire cable is perfectly fine to carry 2 signals to the gateway over the single wall wire. Cat6 uses all 8 wires for a single connection and is not splitable, so be carefull in doing your own wall jack splits attemps with cat6 wont get you cat6. 


 

No.  You are confusing the wire category (a layer 1 specification) with the link layer (a layer 2 specification).

 

100Mbps Ethernet (specification 100Base-TX) uses 4 wires.  This can be run over Category 5, Category 5e, or Category 6 (and 6a and 7) cable.  No matter what cable category it runs over, it uses 4 wires, and always runs at 100 Mbps (and usually full duplex).

 

Gigabit Ethernet (specification 1000Base-T) uses 8 wires.  This can be run over Category 5 (to 180 feet), Category 5e and Category 6 (to 300 feet), and Category 6a and 7 cable.  No matter what cable category it runs over, it uses 8 wires, and always runs at 1000 Mbps full duplex.

 

 

I have never been a fan of Cat 6 cable because it doesn't buy you anything.  People talk about "future-proofing" their network, but we have networking standards that are already in place for faster data transmission and the cable categories are already specified.

 

Gigabit Ethernet needs Cat 5e cable to run at its maximum distance of 300 feet.  The next step up is 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GBase-T), which requires Category 6a cable for maximum distance.  It will run over Category 6 at reduced distances.  But again, to make a 10GBase-T compliant network, everything in the network must be Cat6 or Cat6a, including wallplates, patch panels, patch cables, 8P8C (RJ45) connectors, etc.  It is very difficult to hand-crimp a Cat6/Cat6a RJ45 connector and have it subsequently test to Cat6/6a standards, this is why the techs don't do it.

 

10GBase-T switches are currently running about $800 per port last time I checked, and I don't know anyone who wants to put that in their house.

 


kooldog wrote:

 

Cat5e uses 4 wires, so splitting the 8 wire cable is perfectly fine to carry 2 signals to the gateway over the single wall wire. Cat6 uses all 8 wires for a single connection and is not splitable, so be carefull in doing your own wall jack splits attemps with cat6 wont get you cat6. 


 

No.  You are confusing the wire category (a layer 1 specification) with the link layer (a layer 2 specification).

 

100Mbps Ethernet (specification 100Base-TX) uses 4 wires.  This can be run over Category 5, Category 5e, or Category 6 (and 6a and 7) cable.  No matter what cable category it runs over, it uses 4 wires, and always runs at 100 Mbps (and usually full duplex).

 

Gigabit Ethernet (specification 1000Base-T) uses 8 wires.  This can be run over Category 5 (to 180 feet), Category 5e and Category 6 (to 300 feet), and Category 6a and 7 cable.  No matter what cable category it runs over, it uses 8 wires, and always runs at 1000 Mbps full duplex.

 

 

I have never been a fan of Cat 6 cable because it doesn't buy you anything.  People talk about "future-proofing" their network, but we have networking standards that are already in place for faster data transmission and the cable categories are already specified.

 

Gigabit Ethernet needs Cat 5e cable to run at its maximum distance of 300 feet.  The next step up is 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GBase-T), which requires Category 6a cable for maximum distance.  It will run over Category 6 at reduced distances.  But again, to make a 10GBase-T compliant network, everything in the network must be Cat6 or Cat6a, including wallplates, patch panels, patch cables, 8P8C (RJ45) connectors, etc.  It is very difficult to hand-crimp a Cat6/Cat6a RJ45 connector and have it subsequently test to Cat6/6a standards, this is why the techs don't do it.

 

10GBase-T switches are currently running about $800 per port last time I checked, and I don't know anyone who wants to put that in their house.

 

Re: does uverse work with cat6?

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