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Posted Oct 17, 2008
6:16:01 AM
LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

Long time lurker, who finally decided to dump Dish and Comcast and go 100 % uverse; install is still 2 weeks away, so learning all I can in the meantime..like make them use CAT5E, since everything in my house is Gigabit, etc..

So, my main concerns are two fold:

1. I use a Linksys Pro WRVS4400N wireless/wired router now, which is a wireless N, giving me stunning wireless speeds of around 11megs.( I am on Comcast 15/2 service)

I have read there are some ways to connect your router to the RG, so you can continue to use the wireless features of your current router, without "downgrading" to the Wireless B speeds of the 2Wire RG..has anyone done this successfully?

I have several rooms, two NAS drives, and my printer networked this way, and I have read about so many problems with the RG "seeing" things like networked printers and NAS drives...

 

2. Will they use CAT5E insted of CAT5, so I can utilize my Gigabyte connections everywhere?

I know they will want to try and shortcut the install, by using my existing COAX through out the house, but I won't let them do that..do they carry CAT5E on the trucks, or just CAT5?

Is there a way I can make them use CAT5E insted of CAT5?

 

I just want to make sure that my service doesn't end up being a "downgrade"...I am spoiled with Comcast internet speed now, and how well everything works on my Home Network, and I don't want to spend weeks trying to get everthing working properly after the install.

 

Thanks so much for any ideas or suggestions!!

 

 

Long time lurker, who finally decided to dump Dish and Comcast and go 100 % uverse; install is still 2 weeks away, so learning all I can in the meantime..like make them use CAT5E, since everything in my house is Gigabit, etc..

So, my main concerns are two fold:

1. I use a Linksys Pro WRVS4400N wireless/wired router now, which is a wireless N, giving me stunning wireless speeds of around 11megs.( I am on Comcast 15/2 service)

I have read there are some ways to connect your router to the RG, so you can continue to use the wireless features of your current router, without "downgrading" to the Wireless B speeds of the 2Wire RG..has anyone done this successfully?

I have several rooms, two NAS drives, and my printer networked this way, and I have read about so many problems with the RG "seeing" things like networked printers and NAS drives...

 

2. Will they use CAT5E insted of CAT5, so I can utilize my Gigabyte connections everywhere?

I know they will want to try and shortcut the install, by using my existing COAX through out the house, but I won't let them do that..do they carry CAT5E on the trucks, or just CAT5?

Is there a way I can make them use CAT5E insted of CAT5?

 

I just want to make sure that my service doesn't end up being a "downgrade"...I am spoiled with Comcast internet speed now, and how well everything works on my Home Network, and I don't want to spend weeks trying to get everthing working properly after the install.

 

Thanks so much for any ideas or suggestions!!

 

 

LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 8:39:10 AM
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People frequently post "Cat5" here in the forums, but 99% of the cable that's out there in the field is actually Cat5e.  I would think you would have to special order plain Cat5 these days.

 

You can continue to use the Linksys wireless N router if you want, but you need to follow a few rules:

 

1. Put the Linksys router into the DMZ of the RG.

2. Your computers can be behind the Linksys router, but the STBs/DVR cannot.  They must connect to the RG directly.

 

The RG's wireless is G, by the way, not B.  I get great connections from the RG, especially since it has a pretty powerful transmitter in it (400 mW, I believe).

 

People frequently post "Cat5" here in the forums, but 99% of the cable that's out there in the field is actually Cat5e.  I would think you would have to special order plain Cat5 these days.

 

You can continue to use the Linksys wireless N router if you want, but you need to follow a few rules:

 

1. Put the Linksys router into the DMZ of the RG.

2. Your computers can be behind the Linksys router, but the STBs/DVR cannot.  They must connect to the RG directly.

 

The RG's wireless is G, by the way, not B.  I get great connections from the RG, especially since it has a pretty powerful transmitter in it (400 mW, I believe).

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 11:17:51 AM
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well, if the wireless is G, I can probably live with that..

Will they connect the RG to the switches that I currently use to network everything together, or do they use certain ones only?

 

I guess I don't trust the initial installer to set everything up properly, and I hope they dont have to come back 3 or 4 times just to get everything that is working perfectly now back up to the proper way...I've read so many horror posts about this happenning, I just want to make sure I am not another "victum"

 

thanks for the answer!

 

 

well, if the wireless is G, I can probably live with that..

Will they connect the RG to the switches that I currently use to network everything together, or do they use certain ones only?

 

I guess I don't trust the initial installer to set everything up properly, and I hope they dont have to come back 3 or 4 times just to get everything that is working perfectly now back up to the proper way...I've read so many horror posts about this happenning, I just want to make sure I am not another "victum"

 

thanks for the answer!

 

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 11:29:26 AM
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If you want to mix IPTV and your regular network traffic together, you'll need to use good switches.  The IPTV is sent from the RG to the STBs/DVR as multicast traffic.  Switches that do not implement IGMP v3 (which includes all consumer switches and many pro/enterprise switches) will treat this multicast traffic as broadcast traffic and forward it to all ports.  This amount of network traffic can easily overwhelm cheaper consumer switches.

 

The NetGear GS-105/GS-108/GS-116 switches are known to work well in a mixed environment, and they're gigabit, so your computers can move files around at high speed.  The RG is only 100Mbit, however, so I would recommend hanging a gigabit switch off the RG primarily for computers.  That way, the computers can always have a gigabit path, while the STBs can use the 100Mbit ports on the RG.

 

This is the way I have my network set up, and I've connected 2 desktops, 1 server, 2 laptops, 2 Slingboxes, 3 XBoxes, 2 STBs, 1 DVR, and a Blu-Ray player all to the same network, and it all works together very well.  All my switches are NetGear GS-1xx.

 

If you want to mix IPTV and your regular network traffic together, you'll need to use good switches.  The IPTV is sent from the RG to the STBs/DVR as multicast traffic.  Switches that do not implement IGMP v3 (which includes all consumer switches and many pro/enterprise switches) will treat this multicast traffic as broadcast traffic and forward it to all ports.  This amount of network traffic can easily overwhelm cheaper consumer switches.

 

The NetGear GS-105/GS-108/GS-116 switches are known to work well in a mixed environment, and they're gigabit, so your computers can move files around at high speed.  The RG is only 100Mbit, however, so I would recommend hanging a gigabit switch off the RG primarily for computers.  That way, the computers can always have a gigabit path, while the STBs can use the 100Mbit ports on the RG.

 

This is the way I have my network set up, and I've connected 2 desktops, 1 server, 2 laptops, 2 Slingboxes, 3 XBoxes, 2 STBs, 1 DVR, and a Blu-Ray player all to the same network, and it all works together very well.  All my switches are NetGear GS-1xx.

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 11:37:51 AM
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I'm using a GS105 now to connect most of my networked pc's and printers, although I have one Dlink Switch in the mix as well..

Do they provide Netgear switches on the installation, or do you have to provide them yourself?

 

 

I'm using a GS105 now to connect most of my networked pc's and printers, although I have one Dlink Switch in the mix as well..

Do they provide Netgear switches on the installation, or do you have to provide them yourself?

 

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 11:43:34 AM
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Some installers will provide you a GS-108 if its necessary.  Some won't.  It kind of depends on the tech who comes to install.

 

Some installers will provide you a GS-108 if its necessary.  Some won't.  It kind of depends on the tech who comes to install.

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 11:46:43 AM
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ok, I guess I should get one ready to use in cast the guy they send doesnt have one..

Last question; I assume its smarter to make them run CAT 5 to every TV, and not to let them use the existing Comcast/Dish Network coax... 

ok, I guess I should get one ready to use in cast the guy they send doesnt have one..

Last question; I assume its smarter to make them run CAT 5 to every TV, and not to let them use the existing Comcast/Dish Network coax... 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 12:14:55 PM
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If you have highly "customized" network, and don't want to reconfigure everything, I suggest using your own router behind the RG.

 

This is what I did to use an "internal" router. I set my "internal" router to use DHCP for the WAN address, plugged it's WAN port in to the RG, let the RG assign a local address to the "internal" router and then set that address to the DMZ in the RG. When I go to the "internal" router it shows as having the same WAN, gateway, and DNS addresses that the RG uses.

 

I set the "internal" router to assign addresses to "my" side of the network in a different IP range than what the RG uses (192.168.2.* instead of 192.168.1.*) but using the same subnet mask. My internet works fine with no interuptions and local network tasks (back ups, streaming, etc.) work as expected. I can also still access the RG from "my" side of the network when I need to without having to change any network settings or swap any cables. Leave DHCP running on the RG. You do not need to disable the firewall in the RG as the DMZ will open a pinhole through it to the address you pick (your internal router). Your "N" wireless router might not give you as great a range as the RG, but it should be considerably faster I believe. Just make sure to turn off the wireless in the RG.

                              

If you have highly "customized" network, and don't want to reconfigure everything, I suggest using your own router behind the RG.

 

This is what I did to use an "internal" router. I set my "internal" router to use DHCP for the WAN address, plugged it's WAN port in to the RG, let the RG assign a local address to the "internal" router and then set that address to the DMZ in the RG. When I go to the "internal" router it shows as having the same WAN, gateway, and DNS addresses that the RG uses.

 

I set the "internal" router to assign addresses to "my" side of the network in a different IP range than what the RG uses (192.168.2.* instead of 192.168.1.*) but using the same subnet mask. My internet works fine with no interuptions and local network tasks (back ups, streaming, etc.) work as expected. I can also still access the RG from "my" side of the network when I need to without having to change any network settings or swap any cables. Leave DHCP running on the RG. You do not need to disable the firewall in the RG as the DMZ will open a pinhole through it to the address you pick (your internal router). Your "N" wireless router might not give you as great a range as the RG, but it should be considerably faster I believe. Just make sure to turn off the wireless in the RG.

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 12:38:33 PM
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Thanks, Joe, that is EXACTLY the information I have been looking for!

 

At that point, I should be able to add as many things on "My Side" of the network as I was able to before, correct?

 

take care! 

Thanks, Joe, that is EXACTLY the information I have been looking for!

 

At that point, I should be able to add as many things on "My Side" of the network as I was able to before, correct?

 

take care! 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 12:54:57 PM
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yes

 

                              

yes

 

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 1:49:32 PM
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"I know they will want to try and shortcut the install, by using my existing COAX through out the house, but I won't let them do that..do they carry CAT5E on the trucks, or just CAT5? "

 

if your coax tests good they will want to  use it most likely .....

they charge for new runs of cat5   fyi  (most cases ) if  coax is usable.....

if u are dead set for cat5 versus coax for the stbs then maybe run your own to where the rg3800 should be... (installed)

be tough to run it someplace crazy and not work out  but common sense should prevail here :smileyhappy:

 

 

a thought

randy

"I know they will want to try and shortcut the install, by using my existing COAX through out the house, but I won't let them do that..do they carry CAT5E on the trucks, or just CAT5? "

 

if your coax tests good they will want to  use it most likely .....

they charge for new runs of cat5   fyi  (most cases ) if  coax is usable.....

if u are dead set for cat5 versus coax for the stbs then maybe run your own to where the rg3800 should be... (installed)

be tough to run it someplace crazy and not work out  but common sense should prevail here :smileyhappy:

 

 

a thought

randy

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 2:00:09 PM
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Well, right now, I have ethernet access in every room of my house except for 2 upstairs bedrooms, that are very close to existing switches/Router, and my kitchen tv, which is near where the existing box outside my house is, so I THINK that getting ethernet to the 3 spots that need it, shouldn't be too hard.

 

I have heard that future enhancements and current optimizations happen better over CAT5 than over co-ax; plus the coax in this house is at least 10 years old.

Isn't CAT5 the "preferred" way to connect UVERSE anyway? I am getting voice, internet, and television, and I am a ATT wireless customer already, so all cutting edge, future enhancements, will most like work best when deployed over CAT5 versus COAX, correct?

 

 

Hopefully, the installer will be skilled enough to be able to handle either choice. 

Well, right now, I have ethernet access in every room of my house except for 2 upstairs bedrooms, that are very close to existing switches/Router, and my kitchen tv, which is near where the existing box outside my house is, so I THINK that getting ethernet to the 3 spots that need it, shouldn't be too hard.

 

I have heard that future enhancements and current optimizations happen better over CAT5 than over co-ax; plus the coax in this house is at least 10 years old.

Isn't CAT5 the "preferred" way to connect UVERSE anyway? I am getting voice, internet, and television, and I am a ATT wireless customer already, so all cutting edge, future enhancements, will most like work best when deployed over CAT5 versus COAX, correct?

 

 

Hopefully, the installer will be skilled enough to be able to handle either choice. 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Oct 17, 2008 2:58:22 PM
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Just tell them you have comcast on your coax now and that it can't be used and that they need to make home runs of CAT5 from all DVR/STBs to the RG.

                              

Just tell them you have comcast on your coax now and that it can't be used and that they need to make home runs of CAT5 from all DVR/STBs to the RG.

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Nov 4, 2008 4:43:24 AM
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just as a follow up, I have not attached my previous router to the 3800, because I am getting GREAT wireless speeds from the 3800; I have the 10 meg service, and my wireless speed tests, on the second floor of my house, with the RG in the basement, are around 9 megs!

I didn't know wirelessG could put out speeds so similar to the wired connection, but, less is best, so if these speeds continue, my old router will be heading to Ebay!

 

 

   

 

just as a follow up, I have not attached my previous router to the 3800, because I am getting GREAT wireless speeds from the 3800; I have the 10 meg service, and my wireless speed tests, on the second floor of my house, with the RG in the basement, are around 9 megs!

I didn't know wirelessG could put out speeds so similar to the wired connection, but, less is best, so if these speeds continue, my old router will be heading to Ebay!

 

 

   

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Nov 4, 2008 8:53:57 AM
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wase4711 wrote:

just as a follow up, I have not attached my previous router to the 3800, because I am getting GREAT wireless speeds from the 3800; I have the 10 meg service, and my wireless speed tests, on the second floor of my house, with the RG in the basement, are around 9 megs!

I didn't know wirelessG could put out speeds so similar to the wired connection, but, less is best, so if these speeds continue, my old router will be heading to Ebay!


That's just the internet. Wireless G max is 54Mbps which is fine for your 10Mbps internet, but if you want to transfer files from one computer to another, your N router will be much faster so don't toss it just yet.

                              


wase4711 wrote:

just as a follow up, I have not attached my previous router to the 3800, because I am getting GREAT wireless speeds from the 3800; I have the 10 meg service, and my wireless speed tests, on the second floor of my house, with the RG in the basement, are around 9 megs!

I didn't know wirelessG could put out speeds so similar to the wired connection, but, less is best, so if these speeds continue, my old router will be heading to Ebay!


That's just the internet. Wireless G max is 54Mbps which is fine for your 10Mbps internet, but if you want to transfer files from one computer to another, your N router will be much faster so don't toss it just yet.

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Nov 4, 2008 9:03:10 AM
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good point; I forgot that sometimes I transfer gigs of files along the network..

Why the hell didnt they make the RG ports gigabyte???  Everything else on the uverse system is cutting edge...

 

 

good point; I forgot that sometimes I transfer gigs of files along the network..

Why the hell didnt they make the RG ports gigabyte???  Everything else on the uverse system is cutting edge...

 

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Nov 6, 2008 5:37:21 AM
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Costs and the majority of their clients don't use it.
Costs and the majority of their clients don't use it.

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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Nov 6, 2008 6:15:03 AM
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yes, but for the few extra dollars that it might cost them, they would make the RG more "obsolescence" proof, plus, eventually, won't everything be on gigabyte, insted of 10/100?

 

 

yes, but for the few extra dollars that it might cost them, they would make the RG more "obsolescence" proof, plus, eventually, won't everything be on gigabyte, insted of 10/100?

 

 

Re: LOVE MY FAST WIRELESS, BUT HOW MUCH SLOWER IS THE UVERSE RG?

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