Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

Contributor

Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

I understand why the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) has to be the gateway device if you have TV w/ UV, but I only have UV internet and would have to replace the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) w/ my own.  Is this a possibility?  

 

Thanks,

Greg

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Message 1 of 8
Professor

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

Nope...You'll need the RG for all Uverse services.

Message 2 of 8
Master

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?


greggie wrote:

I understand why the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) has to be the gateway device if you have TV w/ UV, but I only have UV internet and would have to replace the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) w/ my own.  Is this a possibility?  

 

Thanks,

Greg


  u can run a router behind the rg  and put ur router in the dmz///

 

 do a search of "router behind router"

 

 

 

 

 fwiw

 randy

Message 3 of 8
Scholar

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?


greggie wrote:

I understand why the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) has to be the gateway device if you have TV w/ UV, but I only have UV internet and would have to replace the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) w/ my own.  Is this a possibility?  

 

Thanks,

Greg


The U-verse gateway is a combination modem/router so you have to have it for Internet service.   Unfortunately, the U-verse gateway is only a 10/100 switch with "g" wireless.   I have a total of 9 gigabit devices coming in from gigabit switches and the LAN throughput is noticeably slower since my gigabit router was replaced by the 2-Wire gateway.     AT&T's maxium non-U-verse  DSL speed in my area is 3Mbps; which meant that I had to go to U-verse to get a faster Internet connection.   Now I have faster Internet and slower LAN performance -- which was not at all what I wanted. 

 

I  will probably try some experiments using my old gigabit router with the 2-wire gateway but my experiences with AT&T support has not been good if you don't use their slow routers and I suspect it will be even worse using a router connected to their gateway.

Message 4 of 8
Scholar

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

As others on this board have suggested, you can run a gigabit switch or gigabit router behind the 2wire RG, hence allowing all your LAN devices to communicate at full gigabit speeds.  Only your internet bound traffic would slow down as it heads on down your inet connection - typically in the 6 - 24 mbs range with Uverse.

Message 5 of 8

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

If you have highly "customized" network, and don't want to reconfigure everything, I suggest using your own router behind the RG.


This is what I did to use an "internal" router. I set my "internal" router to use DHCP for the WAN address, plugged it's WAN port in to the RG and rebooted it. Let the RG assign a local address to the "internal" router and then set that address to the DMZ in the RG. When I go to the "internal" router it shows as having the same WAN, gateway, and DNS addresses that the RG uses.


I set the "internal" router to assign addresses to "my" side of the network in a different IP range than what the RG uses (192.168.2.* instead of 192.168.1.*) but using the same subnet mask (255.255.255.0). My internet works fine with no interuptions and local network tasks (back ups, streaming, etc.) work as expected. I can also still access the RG from "my" side of the network when I need to without having to change any network settings or swap any cables. Leave DHCP running on the RG. You do not need to disable the firewall in the RG as the DMZ will open a pinhole through it to the address you pick (your internal router). If you have existing wireless on your router that your satisfied with and want to keep, just make sure to turn off the wireless in the RG.


As for the STBs they should be run straight out of the RG with CAT5 or RG6 Coax.


If you currently have your router behind a basic DSL or Cable modem, Your setup will be pretty much the same. The RG will replace your modem, then go into your existing router and change it's internet connection type to Dynamic or DHCP. Then change it's internal network IP adress and DHCP Pool and you should be good to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Message 6 of 8
Contributor

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

Hi Computer-Joe,

 

Your explanation is similar to my network scenario before I got the U-verse service. It seem to me that I pretty much understand your explanation, but still need a little help to move forward. I have a Cisco Linksys WRSV4400N Small Business Wireless Gigabit DSL Router with 4/gigabit Ethernet ports for the internal network.

The new 2Wires RG only has 4/100 Ethernet ports and is killing all my data transfer specifically the scheduled nightly backups. It bottlenecks the entire network when this occurs.

No I'm with this dilemma trying to cancel everything and go back to the old system. But your solution might work for me and perhaps it will save me the hassle to switch back to the old system.

If possible, can you draw a small sketch or diagram on PowerPoint or and MS word document that I could use to guide myself to make your recommended configuration. Your assistance will be greatly appreciated.

My email address is: vrodrigu@Bellsouth.net, and if you please help save this new system and allow us to get the benefit of both worlds.

 

Thanks

Message 7 of 8

Re: Does the 2Wire "residential gateway" (RG) *have* to be the gateway device?

It's easy.

 

1)  Get yourself a gigabit switch, NOT a router or hub.  You can pick them up for less than $50.  It needs enough ports to service all your PCs plus one to connect upstream to the RG.

 

2)  Using Ethernet cable, connect one port on the switch to one port on your RG.  Then plug your computers into the other ports on the switch.

 

3)  You're done!!!!  Now your PCs will communicate with each other at gigabit speeds for file transfers, backups, etc.  Only when you access an Internet site will it go through the 100 megabit port on the RG, which is plenty fast enough.  

 

update:  forgot step (0)... put your fancy Cisco router on the shelf, you don't need it any more.

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