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Posted Sep 12, 2013
9:42:10 PM
Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

As you already know  HEVC is the successor of the H.264 codec.    HEVC is offering twice the compression right of  the H.264 codec while mainting PQ. 

Uverse currently uses the H.264 codec to compress video to be transfered via broadband.


How much better will the PQ be with the HEVC codec?

As you already know  HEVC is the successor of the H.264 codec.    HEVC is offering twice the compression right of  the H.264 codec while mainting PQ. 

Uverse currently uses the H.264 codec to compress video to be transfered via broadband.


How much better will the PQ be with the HEVC codec?

Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 13, 2013 4:41:47 AM
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Theisonews wrote:

As you already know  HEVC is the successor of the H.264 codec.    HEVC is offering twice the compression right of  the H.264 codec while mainting PQ. 

Uverse currently uses the H.264 codec to compress video to be transfered via broadband.


How much better will the PQ be with the HEVC codec?


 

If the new standard halves the bandwidth requirement of the stream it just means they can cram more down the pipe.

 

Quantity not quality.

 

 

 

 




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Theisonews wrote:

As you already know  HEVC is the successor of the H.264 codec.    HEVC is offering twice the compression right of  the H.264 codec while mainting PQ. 

Uverse currently uses the H.264 codec to compress video to be transfered via broadband.


How much better will the PQ be with the HEVC codec?


 

If the new standard halves the bandwidth requirement of the stream it just means they can cram more down the pipe.

 

Quantity not quality.

 

 

 

 




__________________________________________________________
How can you be in two places at once, when your not anywhere at all?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want to become a procrastinator, but I keep putting it off.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are three kinds of people, those that can count, and those that can't.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
“Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature has made them." :Bertrand Russell

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Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 13, 2013 5:50:16 AM
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ACE - Expert

1) Agree with Computer Joe in that while they could use this to increase the amount of picture information contained in the same bandwidth, they are MUCH more likely to maintain the same amount of picture information per second and half the bandwidth.  If in doubt, just look to history.

 

2) I guess the when depends on whether the installed base of U-verse DVRs and STBs can run HEVC on the current hardware platform.  4+ million installed boxes means a lot of hardware cost to switch over if it can't be done purely in software.

 

Since the ink has barely dried on the standard (3 months ago), I would look for widespread implementation in, oh... 2016.  

1) Agree with Computer Joe in that while they could use this to increase the amount of picture information contained in the same bandwidth, they are MUCH more likely to maintain the same amount of picture information per second and half the bandwidth.  If in doubt, just look to history.

 

2) I guess the when depends on whether the installed base of U-verse DVRs and STBs can run HEVC on the current hardware platform.  4+ million installed boxes means a lot of hardware cost to switch over if it can't be done purely in software.

 

Since the ink has barely dried on the standard (3 months ago), I would look for widespread implementation in, oh... 2016.  

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 13, 2013 6:46:31 AM
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JefferMC wrote:
I guess the when depends on whether the installed base of U-verse DVRs and STBs can run HEVC on the current hardware platform.  4+ million installed boxes means a lot of hardware cost to switch over if it can't be done purely in software.

 

Nope.  The video processing in all current STBs is done in hardware, the chips are H.264 only.

 

HEVC would require new STBs all the way around.

 


JefferMC wrote:
I guess the when depends on whether the installed base of U-verse DVRs and STBs can run HEVC on the current hardware platform.  4+ million installed boxes means a lot of hardware cost to switch over if it can't be done purely in software.

 

Nope.  The video processing in all current STBs is done in hardware, the chips are H.264 only.

 

HEVC would require new STBs all the way around.

 

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 13, 2013 8:07:20 AM
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SomeJoe7777 wrote:

 

Nope.  The video processing in all current STBs is done in hardware, the chips are H.264 only.

 

HEVC would require new STBs all the way around.

 


 That was my suspicion.  Thanks for the confirmation.


SomeJoe7777 wrote:

 

Nope.  The video processing in all current STBs is done in hardware, the chips are H.264 only.

 

HEVC would require new STBs all the way around.

 


 That was my suspicion.  Thanks for the confirmation.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 16, 2013 2:14:21 PM
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ACE - Master

Since I'm much less informed than the rest of you on these technical matters I can't really offer a valid opinion.  But that has never stopped me in the past.   Whenever I hear the words "more compression" in relation to audio or video.....or still images....I bristle.  In my world.....more compression meansl increased loss of quality in the image....video...or sound.  Whichever is getting compressed.  I guess we have to accept it as an economic reality.  But that doesn't mean I have to like it.

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other peoples' money. .......Margaret Thatcher

Since I'm much less informed than the rest of you on these technical matters I can't really offer a valid opinion.  But that has never stopped me in the past.   Whenever I hear the words "more compression" in relation to audio or video.....or still images....I bristle.  In my world.....more compression meansl increased loss of quality in the image....video...or sound.  Whichever is getting compressed.  I guess we have to accept it as an economic reality.  But that doesn't mean I have to like it.

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other peoples' money. .......Margaret Thatcher
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 16, 2013 4:16:18 PM
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"More compression" can mean loss of quality, but the algorithm improvements can offset the loss in bitrate.

We saw this in the change from MPEG-2 to H.264. For SD, MPEG-2 below about 3.5 - 4 Mbps started to look pretty ugly. But H.264 can easily produce a beautiful picture at 2 - 2.5 Mbps.

The same will be seen with HEVC. For full 1080p/24 HD, you need anywhere from 7 - 14 Mbps (depending on how the film was shot) to look really good, and HEVC may be able to do the same thing in the 4 - 8 Mbps range.

The companies that stand the most to benefit from HEVC are the streaming companies like NetFlix, Amazon, etc. As required bitrates go down and Internet bandwidth continues to go up, streaming may become a viable competitor to Blu-Ray in terms of quality (it's currently not anywhere close).
"More compression" can mean loss of quality, but the algorithm improvements can offset the loss in bitrate.

We saw this in the change from MPEG-2 to H.264. For SD, MPEG-2 below about 3.5 - 4 Mbps started to look pretty ugly. But H.264 can easily produce a beautiful picture at 2 - 2.5 Mbps.

The same will be seen with HEVC. For full 1080p/24 HD, you need anywhere from 7 - 14 Mbps (depending on how the film was shot) to look really good, and HEVC may be able to do the same thing in the 4 - 8 Mbps range.

The companies that stand the most to benefit from HEVC are the streaming companies like NetFlix, Amazon, etc. As required bitrates go down and Internet bandwidth continues to go up, streaming may become a viable competitor to Blu-Ray in terms of quality (it's currently not anywhere close).

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 16, 2013 8:19:58 PM
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ACE - Master

Thanks for the clarification S.J.   That is reassuring info.  We are completely dependant on our picture quality from UV.  Never got around to purchasing a blue ray DVD player.  We have a nice sharp picture on our Sony but would hate to lose any of that image quality that we are spoiled to.

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other peoples' money. .......Margaret Thatcher

Thanks for the clarification S.J.   That is reassuring info.  We are completely dependant on our picture quality from UV.  Never got around to purchasing a blue ray DVD player.  We have a nice sharp picture on our Sony but would hate to lose any of that image quality that we are spoiled to.

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other peoples' money. .......Margaret Thatcher
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Sep 17, 2013 10:33:43 AM
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SomeJoe7777 wrote:
"More compression" can mean loss of quality, but the algorithm improvements can offset the loss in bitrate.

We saw this in the change from MPEG-2 to H.264. For SD, MPEG-2 below about 3.5 - 4 Mbps started to look pretty ugly. But H.264 can easily produce a beautiful picture at 2 - 2.5 Mbps.

The same will be seen with HEVC. For full 1080p/24 HD, you need anywhere from 7 - 14 Mbps (depending on how the film was shot) to look really good, and HEVC may be able to do the same thing in the 4 - 8 Mbps range.

The companies that stand the most to benefit from HEVC are the streaming companies like NetFlix, Amazon, etc. As required bitrates go down and Internet bandwidth continues to go up, streaming may become a viable competitor to Blu-Ray in terms of quality (it's currently not anywhere close).

 

 

HEVC would definitely be a boon for AT&T's bandwidth strapped systems (last mile copper) and thus it's Uverse TV customers. They could either up the HD stream count, or shift more bandwidth from TV to Internet/VOIP. Unfortunately, as was mentioned their installed base of CPE prohibits them from implementing it. So, although it could potentially make them more money through increased offerings/features, it'll cost a boat load to scrap the current CPE and virtually start from scratch.

 

Like a jar of cookies, just out of reach.Smiley Sad

 

 

 

 

 

 




__________________________________________________________
How can you be in two places at once, when your not anywhere at all?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want to become a procrastinator, but I keep putting it off.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are three kinds of people, those that can count, and those that can't.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
“Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature has made them." :Bertrand Russell

                              


SomeJoe7777 wrote:
"More compression" can mean loss of quality, but the algorithm improvements can offset the loss in bitrate.

We saw this in the change from MPEG-2 to H.264. For SD, MPEG-2 below about 3.5 - 4 Mbps started to look pretty ugly. But H.264 can easily produce a beautiful picture at 2 - 2.5 Mbps.

The same will be seen with HEVC. For full 1080p/24 HD, you need anywhere from 7 - 14 Mbps (depending on how the film was shot) to look really good, and HEVC may be able to do the same thing in the 4 - 8 Mbps range.

The companies that stand the most to benefit from HEVC are the streaming companies like NetFlix, Amazon, etc. As required bitrates go down and Internet bandwidth continues to go up, streaming may become a viable competitor to Blu-Ray in terms of quality (it's currently not anywhere close).

 

 

HEVC would definitely be a boon for AT&T's bandwidth strapped systems (last mile copper) and thus it's Uverse TV customers. They could either up the HD stream count, or shift more bandwidth from TV to Internet/VOIP. Unfortunately, as was mentioned their installed base of CPE prohibits them from implementing it. So, although it could potentially make them more money through increased offerings/features, it'll cost a boat load to scrap the current CPE and virtually start from scratch.

 

Like a jar of cookies, just out of reach.Smiley Sad

 

 

 

 

 

 




__________________________________________________________
How can you be in two places at once, when your not anywhere at all?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want to become a procrastinator, but I keep putting it off.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are three kinds of people, those that can count, and those that can't.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
“Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature has made them." :Bertrand Russell

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Jun 28, 2014 4:53:12 PM
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Edited by infinity1976 on Jun 28, 2014 at 4:56:19 PM

So next question is over how many years does AT&T guess the "useful life" is to depreciate the STB's?   My guess is a lot of them (early ones) are off the books already.  Somene in accounting will probably doing a cost benefit analysis on changing them out.  Plus cost of new encoders, network changes...

 

I would think to do 4k or UHD HEVC will be necessary.  Those who want it will have to change STB's.  I'd guess it'll be on demand to start.  Wonder how long they will wait before they start to do any of this.

 

Seeing as how there is hardly any content currently I doubt they are rushing...  I think they'll be a decent amount next year.

 

So next question is over how many years does AT&T guess the "useful life" is to depreciate the STB's?   My guess is a lot of them (early ones) are off the books already.  Somene in accounting will probably doing a cost benefit analysis on changing them out.  Plus cost of new encoders, network changes...

 

I would think to do 4k or UHD HEVC will be necessary.  Those who want it will have to change STB's.  I'd guess it'll be on demand to start.  Wonder how long they will wait before they start to do any of this.

 

Seeing as how there is hardly any content currently I doubt they are rushing...  I think they'll be a decent amount next year.

 

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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Jun 30, 2014 7:08:13 PM
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ACE - Guru

I still have 3 STBs from 2007

Im not Smart! The Voices in my Head are!!

I still have 3 STBs from 2007

Im not Smart! The Voices in my Head are!!
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Will Uverse upgrade to HEVC

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