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Posted Apr 21, 2013
12:16:14 PM
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Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

Hi,

 

I have moved to a new place and would like to watch pre-recorded shows while getting my new service in place.  Is it possible to move the STB/Receiver and Gateway to the new place, run stand alone and still be able to watch the shows recorded in the STB?

 

Thanks,

Roy

Hi,

 

I have moved to a new place and would like to watch pre-recorded shows while getting my new service in place.  Is it possible to move the STB/Receiver and Gateway to the new place, run stand alone and still be able to watch the shows recorded in the STB?

 

Thanks,

Roy

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Apr 21, 2013 12:26:23 PM
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ACE - Expert
mderoy - Unfortunately, no. Paranoid Microsoft designed it so that it requires connection to the mother ship to verify that you have permission to view the prized content. It may cost them millions to allow you a little entertainment while you wait.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
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Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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Apr 27, 2013 10:41:58 PM
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gregzoll_1 wrote:

Never stated that Youtube enforces DRM, so do not really know where in the world you pulled that one from.


You can't even follow what's going on here.  My point #1 above is MY reason that your argument can't be correct.  It is not something I claim you said.  Good Lord.

 

 


gregzoll_1 wrote:


DVR's from other providers, can enforce non-playback when the network is down if they choose



That is exactly the point.  If other DVR providers can choose whether or not to apply DRM, why couldn't AT&T and/or Microsoft choose whether to apply DRM?  You can't have it both ways.  Why would DirecTV/Dish Network/Comcast be able to choose DRM enforcement, but AT&t/Microsoft are forced to apply DRM enforcement?

 

 


gregzoll_1 wrote:


As for the delivery mechanism, I have already linked the information from Cisco, and also linked another if you wish to pay for the White paper @ $30, if you wish.

 

he Encryptonite ONE System ... [snip]



Where in any of that does it say that DRM is required?  It doesn't.  It only says that it's supported should the distrubution provider WANT to use it.  Dude, the Cisco stuff is an advertisement to the distributors -- it's purpose is to make a sale.  Of course Cisco will highlight everything the boxes are capable of, but the distributor doesn't HAVE to use every feature.  You know, Cisco makes models of their IPTV boxes that also take an antenna input.  Does that mean that the distributor is REQUIRED to support the antenna input?  They also make the boxes' USB ports with the ability to use external hard drives.  Does that mean that the distributor is REQUIRED to enable the use of external hard drives?  Hint: No.  The distributor can use or not use whatever features they want to.

 

Microsoft and/or AT&T have chosen to use the DRM feature to prevent pre-recorded DVR content playback.  But they didn't HAVE to.  They could have just as easily made it so that you could playback the pre-recorded DVR content.

 

THAT is my question to you, and is the exact reason that you have not proven anything.  Prove to me that pre-recorded DVR content playback is technically impossible on an IPTV system.  CIte any document you want that states that outright.  (Hint: there is no such document or statement, because it isn't true.)

 

Walk me through the technical scenario where it becomes impossible.  Tell me what's happening in the software code, tell me what's going on inside the box.  Describe to me why you think this is a technical impossibility.  Don't show us another sales flyer from some company or a generic description of a DRM system.  I know how they work, I don't need some pretty sales graphic.  YOU describe to me how the system cannot possiby do this, from a techincal level.  Put your money where your mouth is and prove to everyone here that you are more than a poser with some sales flyers and technospeak.

 

To give you a head start on the technical description, I'll first describe to you exactly how DirecTV does it:

 

  1. The encrypted video stream is sent from the satellite to the box via the satellite cable.  Along with the encrypted video is a low-bitrate stream of commands, authorization packets, and requirements for the customer's box (known in the satellite world as an Integrated Receiver-Decoder, aka IRD) to decode this video.
  2. The authorization packet contains a required tier number that the customer must be subscribed to, a program rating, zip code blackout restrictions if any, a date/time stamp, and a digital signature.  The authorization packet itself is also encrypted.
  3. The IRD decodes the authorization packet, checks all the particulars, and determines if the customer should be allowed to view the video or not.  If so, the IRD (with the help of the smartcard) deduce a decryption key for the video itself.
  4. The IRD uses this decryption key to actually decrypt the video and send it via HDMI, component, or other connections to the customer's TV.
  5. If the IRD is a DVR, the IRD also begins to write the video stream to the hard drive, but re-encrypts it prior to writing using a locally generated key.  This prevents the video from being read off the hard drive if the hard drive is removed from the IRD.
  6. To playback pre-recorded video from the DVR, authorization is done through the smartcard by just checking the required subscription tier.  The required tier for the program is on the hard drive as part of the video stream, encrypted with the local key, while the tiers that the customer is subscribed to is on the smartcard (with a date/time limit).  Thus, no authorization server is required.

 

Now, you tell me why this same type of functionality is a technical impossibility in AT&T/Microsoft's system.  You prove to me that it isn't a design choice (by someone), but is instead a technical impossibility.

 

I'm listening.

 


gregzoll_1 wrote:

Never stated that Youtube enforces DRM, so do not really know where in the world you pulled that one from.


You can't even follow what's going on here.  My point #1 above is MY reason that your argument can't be correct.  It is not something I claim you said.  Good Lord.

 

 


gregzoll_1 wrote:


DVR's from other providers, can enforce non-playback when the network is down if they choose



That is exactly the point.  If other DVR providers can choose whether or not to apply DRM, why couldn't AT&T and/or Microsoft choose whether to apply DRM?  You can't have it both ways.  Why would DirecTV/Dish Network/Comcast be able to choose DRM enforcement, but AT&t/Microsoft are forced to apply DRM enforcement?

 

 


gregzoll_1 wrote:


As for the delivery mechanism, I have already linked the information from Cisco, and also linked another if you wish to pay for the White paper @ $30, if you wish.

 

he Encryptonite ONE System ... [snip]



Where in any of that does it say that DRM is required?  It doesn't.  It only says that it's supported should the distrubution provider WANT to use it.  Dude, the Cisco stuff is an advertisement to the distributors -- it's purpose is to make a sale.  Of course Cisco will highlight everything the boxes are capable of, but the distributor doesn't HAVE to use every feature.  You know, Cisco makes models of their IPTV boxes that also take an antenna input.  Does that mean that the distributor is REQUIRED to support the antenna input?  They also make the boxes' USB ports with the ability to use external hard drives.  Does that mean that the distributor is REQUIRED to enable the use of external hard drives?  Hint: No.  The distributor can use or not use whatever features they want to.

 

Microsoft and/or AT&T have chosen to use the DRM feature to prevent pre-recorded DVR content playback.  But they didn't HAVE to.  They could have just as easily made it so that you could playback the pre-recorded DVR content.

 

THAT is my question to you, and is the exact reason that you have not proven anything.  Prove to me that pre-recorded DVR content playback is technically impossible on an IPTV system.  CIte any document you want that states that outright.  (Hint: there is no such document or statement, because it isn't true.)

 

Walk me through the technical scenario where it becomes impossible.  Tell me what's happening in the software code, tell me what's going on inside the box.  Describe to me why you think this is a technical impossibility.  Don't show us another sales flyer from some company or a generic description of a DRM system.  I know how they work, I don't need some pretty sales graphic.  YOU describe to me how the system cannot possiby do this, from a techincal level.  Put your money where your mouth is and prove to everyone here that you are more than a poser with some sales flyers and technospeak.

 

To give you a head start on the technical description, I'll first describe to you exactly how DirecTV does it:

 

  1. The encrypted video stream is sent from the satellite to the box via the satellite cable.  Along with the encrypted video is a low-bitrate stream of commands, authorization packets, and requirements for the customer's box (known in the satellite world as an Integrated Receiver-Decoder, aka IRD) to decode this video.
  2. The authorization packet contains a required tier number that the customer must be subscribed to, a program rating, zip code blackout restrictions if any, a date/time stamp, and a digital signature.  The authorization packet itself is also encrypted.
  3. The IRD decodes the authorization packet, checks all the particulars, and determines if the customer should be allowed to view the video or not.  If so, the IRD (with the help of the smartcard) deduce a decryption key for the video itself.
  4. The IRD uses this decryption key to actually decrypt the video and send it via HDMI, component, or other connections to the customer's TV.
  5. If the IRD is a DVR, the IRD also begins to write the video stream to the hard drive, but re-encrypts it prior to writing using a locally generated key.  This prevents the video from being read off the hard drive if the hard drive is removed from the IRD.
  6. To playback pre-recorded video from the DVR, authorization is done through the smartcard by just checking the required subscription tier.  The required tier for the program is on the hard drive as part of the video stream, encrypted with the local key, while the tiers that the customer is subscribed to is on the smartcard (with a date/time limit).  Thus, no authorization server is required.

 

Now, you tell me why this same type of functionality is a technical impossibility in AT&T/Microsoft's system.  You prove to me that it isn't a design choice (by someone), but is instead a technical impossibility.

 

I'm listening.

 

Re: Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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Apr 28, 2013 4:40:18 AM
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ACE - Master

I have no idea what you 2 are talking about but it sounds like you need to hug it out. Smiley LOL

I have no idea what you 2 are talking about but it sounds like you need to hug it out. Smiley LOL

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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Apr 28, 2013 7:24:43 AM
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ACE - Master

Not to throw a wrench into this debate but my daughter lost connectivity on her TW Cable during storms last night and was able to still watch DVR'ed content.

 

I found this on the internet about TW Cable's DVR's:

 

If the box has been unplugged from electricity after a service disconnect, it will not be able to load the software and therefore you will not be able to access the software to playback recorded programs.
If the box is still plugged in, it will playback even if the service is disconnected.
 

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

Not to throw a wrench into this debate but my daughter lost connectivity on her TW Cable during storms last night and was able to still watch DVR'ed content.

 

I found this on the internet about TW Cable's DVR's:

 

If the box has been unplugged from electricity after a service disconnect, it will not be able to load the software and therefore you will not be able to access the software to playback recorded programs.
If the box is still plugged in, it will playback even if the service is disconnected.
 

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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Apr 28, 2013 8:01:12 AM
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ACE - Master

The problem is that Greg is smart on some things, but just plain wrong on others such as this topic and will not admit it when he is.  No one is disputing the fact that Microsoft did not invent IPTV, the issue is, AT&T worked with Microsoft and Cisco to build equipment for UVerse that requires a connection to be able to view recorded programs.  It's not a requirement of IPTV, but it's an AT&T limitation/requirement.

 

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway

The problem is that Greg is smart on some things, but just plain wrong on others such as this topic and will not admit it when he is.  No one is disputing the fact that Microsoft did not invent IPTV, the issue is, AT&T worked with Microsoft and Cisco to build equipment for UVerse that requires a connection to be able to view recorded programs.  It's not a requirement of IPTV, but it's an AT&T limitation/requirement.

 

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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Apr 28, 2013 8:05:54 AM
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Now, everyone, let's keep on topic here and not fall down that hole into arguing the situation. Do some research and prove it without arguing Smiley Happy or we can just agree to disagree and move on.

Remember to always mark items that you find useful as "Accepted Solutions”, you can even mark multiple posts in a single thread.  This will help other users find this information too!!


Now, everyone, let's keep on topic here and not fall down that hole into arguing the situation. Do some research and prove it without arguing Smiley Happy or we can just agree to disagree and move on.

Remember to always mark items that you find useful as "Accepted Solutions”, you can even mark multiple posts in a single thread.  This will help other users find this information too!!


Re: Watching pre-recorded Uverse content while disconnected from Uverse

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