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Posted Aug 25, 2013
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NVG589 security

Is there a way to set up security on the NV589 gateway so that the default IP address (192.168.1.254) home page does not show all of the security details (SSID, network key etc) ?

Is there a way to set up security on the NV589 gateway so that the default IP address (192.168.1.254) home page does not show all of the security details (SSID, network key etc) ?

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Aug 30, 2013 2:53:11 PM
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chavali wrote:

My issue is that any random person (within range of my network) can pull up this page and connect to my network, since the SSID and WPA key are displayed on the home page.


 

How is someone going to pull this page up before they connect?

 

They can't connect to your router without the SSID and WPA key, and they can't display this page that shows them without being connected.  Chicken and egg problem.

 

 

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NVG589 security

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Aug 30, 2013 7:15:12 AM
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Bump - is there really no way to secure this page ?

Bump - is there really no way to secure this page ?

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Aug 30, 2013 7:40:40 AM
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There is another thread about this same problem related to the NVG510. In short: yes these RGs have crappy security features, and the folks claiming to be "experts" on this forum are being totally dismissive (saying things like "if someone's determined to hack your network, they're going to get in no matter what you do"). My plan is to shut off the NVG589 wireless capabilities and reinstall my old router in a cascade setup (I think there's a thread explaining how to do this, but I don't have the link handy).

There is another thread about this same problem related to the NVG510. In short: yes these RGs have crappy security features, and the folks claiming to be "experts" on this forum are being totally dismissive (saying things like "if someone's determined to hack your network, they're going to get in no matter what you do"). My plan is to shut off the NVG589 wireless capabilities and reinstall my old router in a cascade setup (I think there's a thread explaining how to do this, but I don't have the link handy).

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Aug 30, 2013 10:54:26 AM
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Edited by bauwls on Aug 30, 2013 at 10:54:54 AM

Cutter, what does securing the Modem GUI page have to do with wireless security? To make any changes, you have to enter the Device Access Code listed on the left hand side of your modem, which you can change to suit personal preferences. In order to access the modem GUI page, you have to be connected to the RG via wifi (WPA-PSK TKIP & WPA2-PSK AES) and have the Device Access Code to make any changes.

chavali, I have not found a way thus far to secure the page and not provide perhaps sensitive details. You can prevent making any changes by securing the Device Access Code. CutterB's solution of putting router behind router works as pulling up the default gateway's page will pull up the router's interface with no access to the RG's GUI if they are on different networks.

Cutter, what does securing the Modem GUI page have to do with wireless security? To make any changes, you have to enter the Device Access Code listed on the left hand side of your modem, which you can change to suit personal preferences. In order to access the modem GUI page, you have to be connected to the RG via wifi (WPA-PSK TKIP & WPA2-PSK AES) and have the Device Access Code to make any changes.

chavali, I have not found a way thus far to secure the page and not provide perhaps sensitive details. You can prevent making any changes by securing the Device Access Code. CutterB's solution of putting router behind router works as pulling up the default gateway's page will pull up the router's interface with no access to the RG's GUI if they are on different networks.

Re: NVG589 security

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Aug 30, 2013 12:52:02 PM
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Edited by chavali on Aug 30, 2013 at 12:57:33 PM

Thanks much for the responses.

 

My issue is that any random person (within range of my network) can pull up this page and connect to my network, since the SSID and WPA key are displayed on the home page.

 

I have changed the decive access code and also have a MAC filtering whitelist set up to thwart such access, but it is feeble protection against a determined hacker.

 

Putting another router to act as a firewall is beyond the technical capabilities of a vast majority of customers and it is unreasonable to expect them to install such a solution themselves, let alone troubelshoot issues if/when they occur.

 

I find it astonishing that there is no way to secure this page. I will send a note to AT&T executives and let them know that this is unacceptable
.

 

 

Thanks much for the responses.

 

My issue is that any random person (within range of my network) can pull up this page and connect to my network, since the SSID and WPA key are displayed on the home page.

 

I have changed the decive access code and also have a MAC filtering whitelist set up to thwart such access, but it is feeble protection against a determined hacker.

 

Putting another router to act as a firewall is beyond the technical capabilities of a vast majority of customers and it is unreasonable to expect them to install such a solution themselves, let alone troubelshoot issues if/when they occur.

 

I find it astonishing that there is no way to secure this page. I will send a note to AT&T executives and let them know that this is unacceptable
.

 

 

Re: NVG589 security

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Aug 30, 2013 2:53:11 PM
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chavali wrote:

My issue is that any random person (within range of my network) can pull up this page and connect to my network, since the SSID and WPA key are displayed on the home page.


 

How is someone going to pull this page up before they connect?

 

They can't connect to your router without the SSID and WPA key, and they can't display this page that shows them without being connected.  Chicken and egg problem.

 

 


chavali wrote:

My issue is that any random person (within range of my network) can pull up this page and connect to my network, since the SSID and WPA key are displayed on the home page.


 

How is someone going to pull this page up before they connect?

 

They can't connect to your router without the SSID and WPA key, and they can't display this page that shows them without being connected.  Chicken and egg problem.

 

 

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Sep 1, 2013 2:16:37 PM
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Thanks - I see your point - I guess I was overthinking (or underthinking ?) the issue - appreciate you pointing out the flaw :-)

 

Srini

Thanks - I see your point - I guess I was overthinking (or underthinking ?) the issue - appreciate you pointing out the flaw :-)

 

Srini

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Sep 3, 2013 1:10:58 PM
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Restricting GUI access (or any other way to administer the device) to hard-wire connections only is the best way to prevent a brute-force attempt to guess the admin password. I laid out in another thread a realistic scenario: Someone "borrows" my smartphone or portable computer, which is set to automatically connect to the network. All he/she has to do is log into the RG to get the key (which is displayed for all to see) and a complete list of all the MAC addresses that are whitelisted. With that information, another more powerful device can be set up to hack the rest of the way in.

Restricting GUI access (or any other way to administer the device) to hard-wire connections only is the best way to prevent a brute-force attempt to guess the admin password. I laid out in another thread a realistic scenario: Someone "borrows" my smartphone or portable computer, which is set to automatically connect to the network. All he/she has to do is log into the RG to get the key (which is displayed for all to see) and a complete list of all the MAC addresses that are whitelisted. With that information, another more powerful device can be set up to hack the rest of the way in.

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Sep 3, 2013 4:53:00 PM
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And you would loan your smartphone with network access to someone who you don't trust and allow them to leave your sight?  And you're worried about what your RG displayed to someone authenticated or physically connected?

 

And you would loan your smartphone with network access to someone who you don't trust and allow them to leave your sight?  And you're worried about what your RG displayed to someone authenticated or physically connected?

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: NVG589 security

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Jul 11, 2014 8:26:48 AM
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AT&T used to use 2Wire Gateway that used a feature to force anyone visiting 192.168.1.254 to login into the page portal of the gateway. Without login credentials there was not way to view the settings. Now that AT&T U-Verse uses the previous Motorola NVG589 acquired by Arris, anyone who is allowed to use your network can easily see/access to  the 192.168.1.254. In chatting with Arris tech support they claim that AT&T did not request the same feature as 2Wire. Arris has 2 other products that indeed have the feature but AT&T did not want to use. Is AT&T doing a backdoor by restricting the feature?

 

Please AT&T, make the request to Arris to deploy the feature. Thanks.

AT&T used to use 2Wire Gateway that used a feature to force anyone visiting 192.168.1.254 to login into the page portal of the gateway. Without login credentials there was not way to view the settings. Now that AT&T U-Verse uses the previous Motorola NVG589 acquired by Arris, anyone who is allowed to use your network can easily see/access to  the 192.168.1.254. In chatting with Arris tech support they claim that AT&T did not request the same feature as 2Wire. Arris has 2 other products that indeed have the feature but AT&T did not want to use. Is AT&T doing a backdoor by restricting the feature?

 

Please AT&T, make the request to Arris to deploy the feature. Thanks.

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Jul 11, 2014 9:28:10 AM
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The 2WIRE's do the same thing on the current firmware: ff you have access to the router, you can see the WiFi password.

 

Which really isn't the end of the world, though I agree it's not the best security practice.  I believe AT&T did that to try to prevent support calls asking what the initial value was, since if they could not see it on the sticker, then they weren't going to see the system password on the sticker either (which it would take to log in to see the password).

 

The 2WIRE's do the same thing on the current firmware: ff you have access to the router, you can see the WiFi password.

 

Which really isn't the end of the world, though I agree it's not the best security practice.  I believe AT&T did that to try to prevent support calls asking what the initial value was, since if they could not see it on the sticker, then they weren't going to see the system password on the sticker either (which it would take to log in to see the password).

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Jan 2, 2015 9:10:42 AM
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@somejoe - unfortunately this answer is useless.  There are plenty of reasons why an admin login screen matters and its not a chicken and an egg problem.  At my house I have a teenager that is on the network but I want to stop him from accessing the configuration of the router.  without a login screen he has full access to change what ever he wants.  

 

Again, is the consensus that this device doesn't offer an admin login screen to limit access to the router's configuration?  Has any expert worked out a reasonable alternative solution?

@somejoe - unfortunately this answer is useless.  There are plenty of reasons why an admin login screen matters and its not a chicken and an egg problem.  At my house I have a teenager that is on the network but I want to stop him from accessing the configuration of the router.  without a login screen he has full access to change what ever he wants.  

 

Again, is the consensus that this device doesn't offer an admin login screen to limit access to the router's configuration?  Has any expert worked out a reasonable alternative solution?

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Jan 2, 2015 9:15:13 AM
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@JEFFER - the real issue is about restricting admin access to just the home network admin.  All these responses are basically saying it can't be done and you're using 'social' examples for why it doesn't matter.  you probably don't have a teenager living at home who needs his chain yanked every so often.  today when I rebooted the router, my browser connection immediately went to the router summary screen when I tried to connect to google (that's an interesting bug but not relevent to this).  I don't want my teenager locking me out of my router, forcing me to reset the device.

 

sounds like the bottom line here is that the device doesn't offer this basic capability.

@JEFFER - the real issue is about restricting admin access to just the home network admin.  All these responses are basically saying it can't be done and you're using 'social' examples for why it doesn't matter.  you probably don't have a teenager living at home who needs his chain yanked every so often.  today when I rebooted the router, my browser connection immediately went to the router summary screen when I tried to connect to google (that's an interesting bug but not relevent to this).  I don't want my teenager locking me out of my router, forcing me to reset the device.

 

sounds like the bottom line here is that the device doesn't offer this basic capability.

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Feb 25, 2015 5:25:11 PM
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I agree with @NimbleThunder 


With no password protection anyone that's in my network (ie. my kids) can:
- reset my wireless network
- restart my phone line

- restart the router/modem itself basically knocking everyone off of wireless and ethernet

Reseting it whenever they want regardless of what I'm doing.  All with virtually no log of who it was that pushed the button.

 

A simple sign-in page would solve this easily - is that really too much to ask?

I agree with @NimbleThunder 


With no password protection anyone that's in my network (ie. my kids) can:
- reset my wireless network
- restart my phone line

- restart the router/modem itself basically knocking everyone off of wireless and ethernet

Reseting it whenever they want regardless of what I'm doing.  All with virtually no log of who it was that pushed the button.

 

A simple sign-in page would solve this easily - is that really too much to ask?

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Feb 25, 2015 6:16:51 PM
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Um... really? 

 

You know, you can change the "System" or "Admin" password, which is needed to reset the router.  Oh, but pulling the plug works, too.   Dang, sorry about that.  And the "System" or "Admin" password doesn't show on any screen (just the sticker on the side, but as I said, you can change that).  It's also needed to change any parameters.  So... exactly what are you complaining about again?

 

 

 

Um... really? 

 

You know, you can change the "System" or "Admin" password, which is needed to reset the router.  Oh, but pulling the plug works, too.   Dang, sorry about that.  And the "System" or "Admin" password doesn't show on any screen (just the sticker on the side, but as I said, you can change that).  It's also needed to change any parameters.  So... exactly what are you complaining about again?

 

 

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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May 20, 2015 9:41:32 AM
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I just upgraded my U-verse internet service and added Uverse TV to my account. As a part of the change, ATT also replaced my 2 wire modem with the new modem (NVG589) and everything is working well. However as I tried configuring my new modem, I discovered that there is no user name / password to lock the modem, and anyone (including my kids) from my home network can see my security settings etc. I understand that no one can make changes to the modem because I have changed the device "Access Code", but I am very distrubed that I am unable to hide my security settings.

 

It appears that ATT is not concerned about this issue and not willing to make any changes. I am considering cancelling both my internet and TV and go to another provider at this time...

I just upgraded my U-verse internet service and added Uverse TV to my account. As a part of the change, ATT also replaced my 2 wire modem with the new modem (NVG589) and everything is working well. However as I tried configuring my new modem, I discovered that there is no user name / password to lock the modem, and anyone (including my kids) from my home network can see my security settings etc. I understand that no one can make changes to the modem because I have changed the device "Access Code", but I am very distrubed that I am unable to hide my security settings.

 

It appears that ATT is not concerned about this issue and not willing to make any changes. I am considering cancelling both my internet and TV and go to another provider at this time...

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May 20, 2015 10:22:13 AM
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Edited by JefferMC on May 20, 2015 at 10:22:29 AM

AT&T has weighed the need for less security conscious customers to have easy access to the information against the more security conscious customer's desire to protect this information and have decided to come down on the Convenience side of the Convenience/Security dilemma.

 

A faster and easier option than switching ISPs would be to turn off the wireless on the RG and place your own router in between your network and the RG, then this would be irrelevant.

 

 

AT&T has weighed the need for less security conscious customers to have easy access to the information against the more security conscious customer's desire to protect this information and have decided to come down on the Convenience side of the Convenience/Security dilemma.

 

A faster and easier option than switching ISPs would be to turn off the wireless on the RG and place your own router in between your network and the RG, then this would be irrelevant.

 

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: NVG589 security

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Jul 3, 2015 11:04:40 PM
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Edited by bigjoed on Jul 3, 2015 at 11:13:22 PM

Its MIND BOGGLING that this router doesnt force a login to view critical router data!!!! Like others have stated, I dont want my teenager or anyone else I grant access to to see this information. This is absolutely NUTS!!

 

Is there a different router we can request from ATT that will force a login?

Its MIND BOGGLING that this router doesnt force a login to view critical router data!!!! Like others have stated, I dont want my teenager or anyone else I grant access to to see this information. This is absolutely NUTS!!

 

Is there a different router we can request from ATT that will force a login?

Re: NVG589 security

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Jul 4, 2015 7:59:39 AM
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ACE - Expert

bigjoed wrote:

...

 

Is there a different router we can request from ATT that will force a login?


No.  If this worries you, you'll need to obtain your own router, install it between the NVG 589 and your network, and disable the wireless on the NVG 589.

 


bigjoed wrote:

...

 

Is there a different router we can request from ATT that will force a login?


No.  If this worries you, you'll need to obtain your own router, install it between the NVG 589 and your network, and disable the wireless on the NVG 589.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Jul 4, 2015 6:03:47 PM
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I just white listed the wifi instead. Yes it bothers me and any sane company would lock this information down via login screen.

I just white listed the wifi instead. Yes it bothers me and any sane company would lock this information down via login screen.

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Jul 28, 2015 6:35:29 PM
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I don't understand your comment that you "white listed the wifi instead."  Are you referring to MAC filtering (i.e.,white listing the devices allowed to gain wifi access to the router)? Please explain.

 

I allow my teenager on the family computer for limited time.  On that computer he finds the router ip address and then goes to that address and plainly sees the network key/password.  He then uses that information to gain internet access on any wireless device in the house-- whether we want him to or not.  

That status page should NOT display that information on reaching the IP address.  There should be some sort of authentication login/password screen prior to displaying that sensitive information.

 

I don't understand your comment that you "white listed the wifi instead."  Are you referring to MAC filtering (i.e.,white listing the devices allowed to gain wifi access to the router)? Please explain.

 

I allow my teenager on the family computer for limited time.  On that computer he finds the router ip address and then goes to that address and plainly sees the network key/password.  He then uses that information to gain internet access on any wireless device in the house-- whether we want him to or not.  

That status page should NOT display that information on reaching the IP address.  There should be some sort of authentication login/password screen prior to displaying that sensitive information.

 

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Jul 28, 2015 9:53:50 PM
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I have two routers. I whitelisted the MAC address of my iPhone and changed the access code on the residential gateway. This way my iPhone can still connect to the residential gateway wifi and no one else can. I hooked up my second router to the gateway via network cable and made it an access point that's does not serve up DHCP IP addresses. Even though they can see the passwords to the wifi on the gateway they can't access it or change it because I changed the access code. This solution works for me until someone pushes the reset/restore button on the back of the gateway. I hate that ATT has made something so easy so freaking difficult now.

I have two routers. I whitelisted the MAC address of my iPhone and changed the access code on the residential gateway. This way my iPhone can still connect to the residential gateway wifi and no one else can. I hooked up my second router to the gateway via network cable and made it an access point that's does not serve up DHCP IP addresses. Even though they can see the passwords to the wifi on the gateway they can't access it or change it because I changed the access code. This solution works for me until someone pushes the reset/restore button on the back of the gateway. I hate that ATT has made something so easy so freaking difficult now.

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Oct 21, 2015 9:03:55 PM
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I bought a 3rd party AP product to add on NVG589 to provide guest wifi access - separate SSID and password. But the guest is still in the same subnet - 192.168.1.x. It means even he gets in as a guest using different SSID and password, he can display the gateway 192.168.1.254 to see my original wifi password. It defeats the whole purpose of setting a guest wifi access.

 

AT&T really sucks!

 

I bought a 3rd party AP product to add on NVG589 to provide guest wifi access - separate SSID and password. But the guest is still in the same subnet - 192.168.1.x. It means even he gets in as a guest using different SSID and password, he can display the gateway 192.168.1.254 to see my original wifi password. It defeats the whole purpose of setting a guest wifi access.

 

AT&T really sucks!

 

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Oct 22, 2015 5:58:17 AM
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yuanpan wrote:

I bought a 3rd party AP product to add on NVG589 to provide guest wifi access - separate SSID and password. But the guest is still in the same subnet - 192.168.1.x. It means even he gets in as a guest using different SSID and password, he can display the gateway 192.168.1.254 to see my original wifi password. It defeats the whole purpose of setting a guest wifi access.

 

AT&T really sucks!

 


@yuanpan, you blame AT&T for the way your 3rd party AP product functions?  Why is that?  You would need a router, not an access point, to provide a true Guest Wi-Fi experience.  What brand/model device is this?

 


yuanpan wrote:

I bought a 3rd party AP product to add on NVG589 to provide guest wifi access - separate SSID and password. But the guest is still in the same subnet - 192.168.1.x. It means even he gets in as a guest using different SSID and password, he can display the gateway 192.168.1.254 to see my original wifi password. It defeats the whole purpose of setting a guest wifi access.

 

AT&T really sucks!

 


@yuanpan, you blame AT&T for the way your 3rd party AP product functions?  Why is that?  You would need a router, not an access point, to provide a true Guest Wi-Fi experience.  What brand/model device is this?

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Oct 22, 2015 6:57:31 PM
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The 3rd party did what they are supposed to do - providing a separate SSID and password for guest. It is AT&T who exposed all the info on the gateway including other wifi password to every user on the network. You tell me who should blame?

 

Before this, I tried to implement a true guest network - with a separate subnet such as 192.168.2.0/24 but I gave up after some research about AT&T home network.

 

As far as I know,

 

1. AT&T's gateway NVG589 doesn't provide such solution, even after I add another hardware - like the 3rd party AP

 

2. AT&T doesn't allow its NVG589 to be replaced by another router that does provide true guest network (different subnet)

 

You seem an AT&T home network expert, I challenge you to come up with a solution to build a true guest network. If you can, I will say "AT&T works", otherwise, I am afraid I have to say again "AT&T sucks".

 

BTW, the AP package I bought is Amped Wireless.

 

The 3rd party did what they are supposed to do - providing a separate SSID and password for guest. It is AT&T who exposed all the info on the gateway including other wifi password to every user on the network. You tell me who should blame?

 

Before this, I tried to implement a true guest network - with a separate subnet such as 192.168.2.0/24 but I gave up after some research about AT&T home network.

 

As far as I know,

 

1. AT&T's gateway NVG589 doesn't provide such solution, even after I add another hardware - like the 3rd party AP

 

2. AT&T doesn't allow its NVG589 to be replaced by another router that does provide true guest network (different subnet)

 

You seem an AT&T home network expert, I challenge you to come up with a solution to build a true guest network. If you can, I will say "AT&T works", otherwise, I am afraid I have to say again "AT&T sucks".

 

BTW, the AP package I bought is Amped Wireless.

 

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Oct 22, 2015 7:24:02 PM
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1) Amped Wireless makes many devices.  You didn't specify which one you have.

 

2) Just because you can't set it up, doesn't mean that it can't be, or that it's AT&T's fault that you can't do it.

 

To set up a guest network, you ought to have something that can do ROUTING behind the NVG589 and has the Guest Network capability.  If you have that, this isn't that hard to setup:

 You connect up the device, and then log into the NVG589,  find it and put it in IP Passthrough mode and reboot your device.  Then turn off Wi-Fi in the NVG589.  Once that's all done, set up your main and guest SSID's however you want.

 

A true access point doesn't do routing, it acts as a switch between the WLAN and the LAN.

 

1) Amped Wireless makes many devices.  You didn't specify which one you have.

 

2) Just because you can't set it up, doesn't mean that it can't be, or that it's AT&T's fault that you can't do it.

 

To set up a guest network, you ought to have something that can do ROUTING behind the NVG589 and has the Guest Network capability.  If you have that, this isn't that hard to setup:

 You connect up the device, and then log into the NVG589,  find it and put it in IP Passthrough mode and reboot your device.  Then turn off Wi-Fi in the NVG589.  Once that's all done, set up your main and guest SSID's however you want.

 

A true access point doesn't do routing, it acts as a switch between the WLAN and the LAN.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: NVG589 security

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Oct 23, 2015 1:15:34 PM
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Scholar

Sounds like alot of parents too lazy to parent if they want AT&T to do the work of good parenting. Residental Grade hardware will allways trump convience over security as they have to market to the average consumer. If you want "pro-consumer" level security then you need to buy that type of hardware.

Sounds like alot of parents too lazy to parent if they want AT&T to do the work of good parenting. Residental Grade hardware will allways trump convience over security as they have to market to the average consumer. If you want "pro-consumer" level security then you need to buy that type of hardware.

Re: NVG589 security

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Oct 23, 2015 7:30:59 PM
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thanks for the suggestion on buidling true guest network. I guess someone will verify if it works. But for me for now, I just turned off wifi from the AT&T gateway and use the two wifi access provided by amped wireless high power dual band N600. One for home and one for guest. This way, no wifi password is exposed by the gateway.

 

thanks for the suggestion on buidling true guest network. I guess someone will verify if it works. But for me for now, I just turned off wifi from the AT&T gateway and use the two wifi access provided by amped wireless high power dual band N600. One for home and one for guest. This way, no wifi password is exposed by the gateway.

Re: NVG589 security

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Oct 23, 2015 7:55:19 PM
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Well, that's fine.  But your Guess Access Point will have no different access from the Other Access Point.  If that's okay with you, great.

 

Well, that's fine.  But your Guess Access Point will have no different access from the Other Access Point.  If that's okay with you, great.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: NVG589 security

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Jul 11, 2016 6:14:02 AM
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@Jeff

Question about IP Passthru on the NVG589.

 

We needed better wireless coverage than the NVG589 modem could provide. We wired a TP-Link Archer C9 to the NVG589 and then turned off the wireless on the NVG589 but that's ALL we did on the RG side. We've had some trouble as of late with web pages not loading. So, I am wondering if we need to tweak settings on the NVG589. We want the Archer to serve as the only router on our home network.

 

1) FYI Firewall status on the NVG has the packet filter and firewall ON. The IP Passthrough and NAT default server is OFF.

2) Should we enable IP Passthrough?

3) If yes, should we choose the fixed DHCP mode using the MAC address of our Archer or just allow the DHCP to be dynamic?

 

Since the NVG has its wireless disabled and it is only connected to the Archer, are both devices still trying to do NAT (and hence contributing to our problem)?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

 

 

@Jeff

Question about IP Passthru on the NVG589.

 

We needed better wireless coverage than the NVG589 modem could provide. We wired a TP-Link Archer C9 to the NVG589 and then turned off the wireless on the NVG589 but that's ALL we did on the RG side. We've had some trouble as of late with web pages not loading. So, I am wondering if we need to tweak settings on the NVG589. We want the Archer to serve as the only router on our home network.

 

1) FYI Firewall status on the NVG has the packet filter and firewall ON. The IP Passthrough and NAT default server is OFF.

2) Should we enable IP Passthrough?

3) If yes, should we choose the fixed DHCP mode using the MAC address of our Archer or just allow the DHCP to be dynamic?

 

Since the NVG has its wireless disabled and it is only connected to the Archer, are both devices still trying to do NAT (and hence contributing to our problem)?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

 

 

Re: NVG589 security

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