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Posted Jun 8, 2014
6:00:31 AM
House wiring

I am renovating my house and want to install ATT Uverse wiring while I have the drywall removed. I was told that I will need to run RJ 11 cable from the outside box to the gateway next to the PC and then cat5 to a hub with cat5 running out of the hub to all the outlets for TVs throughout the house. Can I run cat5 instead of the RJ 11? Also what type of hub or switch do I need to split the TV signal to all of the TV outlets? After reading some of the posts on here, I'm not sure if this is the correct setup. Maybe I should run cat5 from the outside box to a hub/switch and then to the TV outlets and another cat5 from the outside box to the gateway next to my PC. I'm just trying to do all the wiring so when I sign up for service, the technician will have an easier time with the connections and not have to do a bunch of wire runs.

I am renovating my house and want to install ATT Uverse wiring while I have the drywall removed. I was told that I will need to run RJ 11 cable from the outside box to the gateway next to the PC and then cat5 to a hub with cat5 running out of the hub to all the outlets for TVs throughout the house. Can I run cat5 instead of the RJ 11? Also what type of hub or switch do I need to split the TV signal to all of the TV outlets? After reading some of the posts on here, I'm not sure if this is the correct setup. Maybe I should run cat5 from the outside box to a hub/switch and then to the TV outlets and another cat5 from the outside box to the gateway next to my PC. I'm just trying to do all the wiring so when I sign up for service, the technician will have an easier time with the connections and not have to do a bunch of wire runs.

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Jun 9, 2014 5:31:40 AM
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ACE - Expert
mikeandpam910 - What you say is correct for the simple network you have. I am probably generating the confusion by pressing you to consider a very robust network of the unknown future.

I started by saying take advantage of the open walls & make sure you run plenty of wires.

Then I wanted to make sure you realized not placing the RG in the central location required a run between the two. And, I see you do realize it.

Then I keyed on your sentence - I was just going to keep the TV and PC networks seperate.

This starts at the four output ports on the RG - one back to central for TV, one for non-tv and one for the adjacent PC. Of course, your latest description is a subset of the superset. All is good as long as there are plenty of wires available.

Kudos to you for asking and pursuing to catch all the details,
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
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House wiring

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Jun 8, 2014 6:21:08 AM
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ACE - Master

You will need to run a Cat 5e or 6 from the outside box to where ever the gateway will be located.  Then run all of the individual Cat 5e cables to the TV's from the gateway .....or if you will have a central wiring closet run a Cat 5e cable from the outside box to it.  Then run all of your TV cables from that same point to each TV.  The tech will be able to provide a switch if you are going to connect over 4 devices.

 

Think of it as needing a feed from the outside box to the AT&T router (gateway) then running the cables in a Star configuration to each device.

 

Hope this helps.

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

You will need to run a Cat 5e or 6 from the outside box to where ever the gateway will be located.  Then run all of the individual Cat 5e cables to the TV's from the gateway .....or if you will have a central wiring closet run a Cat 5e cable from the outside box to it.  Then run all of your TV cables from that same point to each TV.  The tech will be able to provide a switch if you are going to connect over 4 devices.

 

Think of it as needing a feed from the outside box to the AT&T router (gateway) then running the cables in a Star configuration to each device.

 

Hope this helps.

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: House wiring

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Jun 8, 2014 7:16:49 AM
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ACE - Expert
mikeandpam910 - I would like to add to BBs excellent advice -

Someone is confusing the connector code and the wire code. The wire code is cat5 or cat6. The connector code is RJ-11 or RJ-45. You can google them for wiring diagrams and full explanation.

RJ-11 originated for tel svc & RJ-45 for data, but att does use RJ-11 for data in some cases.

The important secret thing to know is an RJ-11 plug will connect into an RJ-45 jack. So, if you install RJ-45, it will accept a connection with either plug. If you use RJ-11 jack it is more limited.

My other recommendation is to install three or four cables to each service location. It is so inexpensive for you to run the wire now and it will allow you complete flexibility in your central location.
mikeandpam910 - I would like to add to BBs excellent advice -

Someone is confusing the connector code and the wire code. The wire code is cat5 or cat6. The connector code is RJ-11 or RJ-45. You can google them for wiring diagrams and full explanation.

RJ-11 originated for tel svc & RJ-45 for data, but att does use RJ-11 for data in some cases.

The important secret thing to know is an RJ-11 plug will connect into an RJ-45 jack. So, if you install RJ-45, it will accept a connection with either plug. If you use RJ-11 jack it is more limited.

My other recommendation is to install three or four cables to each service location. It is so inexpensive for you to run the wire now and it will allow you complete flexibility in your central location.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: House wiring

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Jun 8, 2014 10:44:40 AM
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Excellent information!!! I think I will run a Cat5 cable from the outside box to my network closet. Then run my lines (4 of them) from my closet to my TV outlets. Then I will run a cat5 cable from the outside box to my PC gateway. I will let the ATT Installer install the connectors, switch and jacks. One other question; is the switch powered? If so, I will need an electrical outlet in my closet.

Excellent information!!! I think I will run a Cat5 cable from the outside box to my network closet. Then run my lines (4 of them) from my closet to my TV outlets. Then I will run a cat5 cable from the outside box to my PC gateway. I will let the ATT Installer install the connectors, switch and jacks. One other question; is the switch powered? If so, I will need an electrical outlet in my closet.

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Jun 8, 2014 11:41:24 AM
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mikeandpam910 - So, you do need power for the switch.

Maybe we are glossing over the RG. In the most common installation you would be placing the RG in the network closet. It is fed by the single feed from the outside box & has four rj-45 output jacks for distribution to your network. It, too, requires power.
mikeandpam910 - So, you do need power for the switch.

Maybe we are glossing over the RG. In the most common installation you would be placing the RG in the network closet. It is fed by the single feed from the outside box & has four rj-45 output jacks for distribution to your network. It, too, requires power.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Jun 8, 2014 2:18:11 PM
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The closet is only a shelf in my utility room. My PC is in the second bedroom and I have 4 outlets for TV in other rooms. I was just going to keep the TV and PC networks seperate. My pc network will only consist of a wired desktop PC and then a wireless router for 2 laptops. I have enough cat5 cable to wire the house as explained above.

The closet is only a shelf in my utility room. My PC is in the second bedroom and I have 4 outlets for TV in other rooms. I was just going to keep the TV and PC networks seperate. My pc network will only consist of a wired desktop PC and then a wireless router for 2 laptops. I have enough cat5 cable to wire the house as explained above.

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Jun 8, 2014 2:35:25 PM
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ACE - Master

You will need to run all of the cables from the closet.  You will have one in there coming from the outside, then (as you mention) 4 for the TV's and then 1 for the PC.   You can split the connections in the closet however you want once the cabling is done.  The RG will be the only source for internet/TV so all will need to be from where it's located.  No need for one from the outside to the PC room. 

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

You will need to run all of the cables from the closet.  You will have one in there coming from the outside, then (as you mention) 4 for the TV's and then 1 for the PC.   You can split the connections in the closet however you want once the cabling is done.  The RG will be the only source for internet/TV so all will need to be from where it's located.  No need for one from the outside to the PC room. 

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: House wiring

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Jun 8, 2014 2:43:22 PM
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mikeandpam910 - OK, I guess I rushed that last response because I was on my way out the door for a fried soft shell crab.

I see that both you and BB used the term gateway, which is correct, it did just not jump out when I was looking for it. I see that you did say you place it next to your computer. I, too, like it positioned close by.

It just seems like people with such comprehensive cat5 networks like it at the central location. Also, wireless signal may sometimes need to be considered.

Just to point out that with the gateway at your computer location, you would require one cat5 to feed the gateway and one to send the signal back to a switch. I see that you want to keep the TV & internet separate (good idea), so that would require two cat5 back to two switches. This is one reason for running multiple cables to the same location.

If the outside box to the gateway was run through, and patched at the network closet it would make it easy to move the RG there. Keeping in mind the next resident.

mikeandpam910 - OK, I guess I rushed that last response because I was on my way out the door for a fried soft shell crab.

I see that both you and BB used the term gateway, which is correct, it did just not jump out when I was looking for it. I see that you did say you place it next to your computer. I, too, like it positioned close by.

It just seems like people with such comprehensive cat5 networks like it at the central location. Also, wireless signal may sometimes need to be considered.

Just to point out that with the gateway at your computer location, you would require one cat5 to feed the gateway and one to send the signal back to a switch. I see that you want to keep the TV & internet separate (good idea), so that would require two cat5 back to two switches. This is one reason for running multiple cables to the same location.

If the outside box to the gateway was run through, and patched at the network closet it would make it easy to move the RG there. Keeping in mind the next resident.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Jun 8, 2014 2:46:29 PM
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I see, the cat5 goes to the RG first and then out of the RG to the PC and all the TV outlets. I was just going to put the switch in the closet to route the signal to my TV outlets because of the central location.

 

I see, the cat5 goes to the RG first and then out of the RG to the PC and all the TV outlets. I was just going to put the switch in the closet to route the signal to my TV outlets because of the central location.

 

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Jun 9, 2014 4:08:14 AM
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Maybe I'm a little confused here. When I say RG or Gateway, isn't that about the size of a modem?  I was thinking it is. If so then I would run 1 cat5 cable from the outside box to the "gateway" next to my PC. My PC connects to the gateway with a patch cable. Then I would run another cat5 cable from the gateway to the closet where the switch is. Then from the switch I would run my 4 cat5 lines to all my TV outlets. Is this correct?

Maybe I'm a little confused here. When I say RG or Gateway, isn't that about the size of a modem?  I was thinking it is. If so then I would run 1 cat5 cable from the outside box to the "gateway" next to my PC. My PC connects to the gateway with a patch cable. Then I would run another cat5 cable from the gateway to the closet where the switch is. Then from the switch I would run my 4 cat5 lines to all my TV outlets. Is this correct?

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Jun 9, 2014 5:22:18 AM
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ACE - Master
RG, aka Residential Gateway, aka Modem.
RG, aka Residential Gateway, aka Modem.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Jun 9, 2014 5:31:40 AM
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mikeandpam910 - What you say is correct for the simple network you have. I am probably generating the confusion by pressing you to consider a very robust network of the unknown future.

I started by saying take advantage of the open walls & make sure you run plenty of wires.

Then I wanted to make sure you realized not placing the RG in the central location required a run between the two. And, I see you do realize it.

Then I keyed on your sentence - I was just going to keep the TV and PC networks seperate.

This starts at the four output ports on the RG - one back to central for TV, one for non-tv and one for the adjacent PC. Of course, your latest description is a subset of the superset. All is good as long as there are plenty of wires available.

Kudos to you for asking and pursuing to catch all the details,
mikeandpam910 - What you say is correct for the simple network you have. I am probably generating the confusion by pressing you to consider a very robust network of the unknown future.

I started by saying take advantage of the open walls & make sure you run plenty of wires.

Then I wanted to make sure you realized not placing the RG in the central location required a run between the two. And, I see you do realize it.

Then I keyed on your sentence - I was just going to keep the TV and PC networks seperate.

This starts at the four output ports on the RG - one back to central for TV, one for non-tv and one for the adjacent PC. Of course, your latest description is a subset of the superset. All is good as long as there are plenty of wires available.

Kudos to you for asking and pursuing to catch all the details,
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: House wiring

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Jun 10, 2014 4:17:31 AM
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Aviewer, I appreciate all your help and patience with me. I just like to make sure that I understand all the technical aspects and have every thing clear in my mind. You have been an enormous help. Thank you again so very much. Hope the crab was delicious!!!

Aviewer, I appreciate all your help and patience with me. I just like to make sure that I understand all the technical aspects and have every thing clear in my mind. You have been an enormous help. Thank you again so very much. Hope the crab was delicious!!!

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