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Posted Feb 19, 2014
10:25:32 AM
Gateway configuration/speed issues?

I have a 2wire Gateway and have subscribed for both Internet and TV. Because the initial WiFi dongle plugged into my desktop computer to pick up a WiFi signal for Internet access didn't work well, yesterday a tech installed an Ethernet cable between the Gateway and my computer.

 

Because I have a NAS (network accessible server) he was nice enough to set things up so using twisted pairs that breaks out at the Gateway going to Ethernet ports 3 and 4 and split at the other end to plug into my desktop and NAS.

 

Internet speeds with this arrangement are great. Averaging a tad below 22 mbps on a U-300 package that comes with 18 mbps Internet.

 

While files on the NAS stream fine over this arrangement, and don't skip like they sometimes did using WiFi, I can't figure out why transferring files between the NAS and my desktop computer are so slow.

 

To test I used 12 files amounting to 9.89 GB and copied them from my desktop to the NAS using a USB 3 connection. Transfer speed averaged 76 MB a second. Using same files trying to copy using this new Ethernet connection the speed dropped to only 10 MB a second. 

 

Obviously I don't want to switch back and forth between USB 3 and Ethernet every time I move files.

 

Where I'm confused is why or does the Gateway reduce the speed? I'm under the impression an Ethernet connection using cat 5 cable should max out around 100 MG a second, not 10. Interestingly, taking the NAS off the network and just hard wiring a single Ethernet cable between my desktop computer and NAS the speeds are at least 4 times faster. I'm stumped.

I have a 2wire Gateway and have subscribed for both Internet and TV. Because the initial WiFi dongle plugged into my desktop computer to pick up a WiFi signal for Internet access didn't work well, yesterday a tech installed an Ethernet cable between the Gateway and my computer.

 

Because I have a NAS (network accessible server) he was nice enough to set things up so using twisted pairs that breaks out at the Gateway going to Ethernet ports 3 and 4 and split at the other end to plug into my desktop and NAS.

 

Internet speeds with this arrangement are great. Averaging a tad below 22 mbps on a U-300 package that comes with 18 mbps Internet.

 

While files on the NAS stream fine over this arrangement, and don't skip like they sometimes did using WiFi, I can't figure out why transferring files between the NAS and my desktop computer are so slow.

 

To test I used 12 files amounting to 9.89 GB and copied them from my desktop to the NAS using a USB 3 connection. Transfer speed averaged 76 MB a second. Using same files trying to copy using this new Ethernet connection the speed dropped to only 10 MB a second. 

 

Obviously I don't want to switch back and forth between USB 3 and Ethernet every time I move files.

 

Where I'm confused is why or does the Gateway reduce the speed? I'm under the impression an Ethernet connection using cat 5 cable should max out around 100 MG a second, not 10. Interestingly, taking the NAS off the network and just hard wiring a single Ethernet cable between my desktop computer and NAS the speeds are at least 4 times faster. I'm stumped.

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Feb 20, 2014 7:15:45 PM
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JefferMC wrote:

You can get a gigabit switch (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108, which AT&T supplies when necessary to complete a configuration) and connect your computer and NAS directly to the switch, and connect the switch to the RG.  Then you can enjoy full gigabit Ethernet between your in-home networking devices.  The 100 Mbps connection on the RG doesn't matter a whole lot when you're going to an Internet connection at less than 25 Mbps.

 

EDIT: Correction to an above post, Cat 6 does not support 10 Gigabit Ethernet, the highest Ethernet standard it supports is Gigabit (just like Cat 5e).  If you want 10 Gigabit support, you have to go with Cat 6a.

 

Basically, this makes the Cat 6 standard a cable without a good purpose in life, at least as far as Ethernet goes.

 


Actually Category 6 cables are capable of supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet, albeit at a reduced maximum length (30-50m - depending on the alien crosstalk environment). Category 6a has 10 Gigabit support without sacrificing the full 100m max length. 

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Gateway configuration/speed issues?

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Feb 20, 2014 2:00:41 PM
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Hello billy,

Averaging 10MBps sounds about right. 2Wire U-verse router ethernet ports are Fast Ethernet (100Mbps). The Gateway "reduces" the speed because of the Fast Ethernet limitation. I'll explain it in more basic detail for your benefit, and the others of those that stumble upon this post with a similar question.

 

Use of bits and Bytes

The speeds measured in networking at typically using bits, rather than bytes. (The reasoning behind this is too complicated for this purpose.) In terms of file transfer and file size, bytes are used. Windows, as well as other operating systems, will typically report bytes rather than bits. There are 8 bits in 1 Byte. Thus, the maximum theoretical speed over Fast Ethernet is 12.5MBps, or 100Mbps. Getting 10MBps is essentially optimal speed over Fast Ethernet. It is likely that your PC and NAS both use Gigabit Ethernet (1000Mbps) and are able to more easily reach higher speeds.

 

Differences in Cabling

Ethernet cabling also has maximum theoretical speeds. There are three major types of ethernet cabling in use today. While for most set-ups, and shorter lengths, the differences may be negligible, it's worth noting that there are specifications for different cabling. The Category 5 cable provides performance of up to 100 MHz and suitable for Fast Ethernet (100BASE-TX) and Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T). Category 5e cables are category 5 cables with crosstalk enhancements, and utilizes four pairs of copper wiring (rather than two) to reach gigabit speeds. Category 6 cables are not as widely used in Local Area Networks, but are becoming more common. Category 6 provides performance of up to 250MHz, and is suitable for the same protocols as Cat5/5e, as well as 10 Gibabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T). 

 

USB is a port to port connection, where as ethernet typically requires a routing median. In comparison USB 1.1 offers Low Speed Interface at 1.5Mbps, Full Speed Interface at 12Mb/s. USB 2.0 (Hi-Speed USB) is backwards compatible with USB 1.1 and offers speeds up to 480Mbps. USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) is newer technology offering speeds up to 5Gbps.

 

The Bottom Line

The maximum performance of your NAS and PC over ethernet via the U-verse routers is limited by the Fast-Ethernet specification. Since the ports on the Ethernet router have a maximum theoretical speed of 100 megbits per second or 12.5 megabytes per second, the 10 megabytes per second demonstrated are accurate up to the router's capabilities. 

Hello billy,

Averaging 10MBps sounds about right. 2Wire U-verse router ethernet ports are Fast Ethernet (100Mbps). The Gateway "reduces" the speed because of the Fast Ethernet limitation. I'll explain it in more basic detail for your benefit, and the others of those that stumble upon this post with a similar question.

 

Use of bits and Bytes

The speeds measured in networking at typically using bits, rather than bytes. (The reasoning behind this is too complicated for this purpose.) In terms of file transfer and file size, bytes are used. Windows, as well as other operating systems, will typically report bytes rather than bits. There are 8 bits in 1 Byte. Thus, the maximum theoretical speed over Fast Ethernet is 12.5MBps, or 100Mbps. Getting 10MBps is essentially optimal speed over Fast Ethernet. It is likely that your PC and NAS both use Gigabit Ethernet (1000Mbps) and are able to more easily reach higher speeds.

 

Differences in Cabling

Ethernet cabling also has maximum theoretical speeds. There are three major types of ethernet cabling in use today. While for most set-ups, and shorter lengths, the differences may be negligible, it's worth noting that there are specifications for different cabling. The Category 5 cable provides performance of up to 100 MHz and suitable for Fast Ethernet (100BASE-TX) and Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T). Category 5e cables are category 5 cables with crosstalk enhancements, and utilizes four pairs of copper wiring (rather than two) to reach gigabit speeds. Category 6 cables are not as widely used in Local Area Networks, but are becoming more common. Category 6 provides performance of up to 250MHz, and is suitable for the same protocols as Cat5/5e, as well as 10 Gibabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T). 

 

USB is a port to port connection, where as ethernet typically requires a routing median. In comparison USB 1.1 offers Low Speed Interface at 1.5Mbps, Full Speed Interface at 12Mb/s. USB 2.0 (Hi-Speed USB) is backwards compatible with USB 1.1 and offers speeds up to 480Mbps. USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) is newer technology offering speeds up to 5Gbps.

 

The Bottom Line

The maximum performance of your NAS and PC over ethernet via the U-verse routers is limited by the Fast-Ethernet specification. Since the ports on the Ethernet router have a maximum theoretical speed of 100 megbits per second or 12.5 megabytes per second, the 10 megabytes per second demonstrated are accurate up to the router's capabilities. 

Re: Gateway configuration/speed issues?

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Feb 20, 2014 4:55:38 PM
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Thank you julywashere for taking the time to give a detail and very lucid explanation of some of the darker mysteries of Networking.  I didn't realize the AT&T supplied 2wire Gateway/router was limited to 100 base-T. I did indeed prior to switching to U-verse have a Netgear 1000 gigabit router between the NAS and PC. I guess I was spoiled.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you julywashere for taking the time to give a detail and very lucid explanation of some of the darker mysteries of Networking.  I didn't realize the AT&T supplied 2wire Gateway/router was limited to 100 base-T. I did indeed prior to switching to U-verse have a Netgear 1000 gigabit router between the NAS and PC. I guess I was spoiled.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Feb 20, 2014 6:31:29 PM
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Edited by JefferMC on Feb 20, 2014 at 6:42:25 PM

You can get a gigabit switch (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108, which AT&T supplies when necessary to complete a configuration) and connect your computer and NAS directly to the switch, and connect the switch to the RG.  Then you can enjoy full gigabit Ethernet between your in-home networking devices.  The 100 Mbps connection on the RG doesn't matter a whole lot when you're going to an Internet connection at less than 25 Mbps.

 

EDIT: Correction to an above post, Cat 6 does not support 10 Gigabit Ethernet, the highest Ethernet standard it supports is Gigabit (just like Cat 5e).  If you want 10 Gigabit support, you have to go with Cat 6a.

 

Basically, this makes the Cat 6 standard a cable without a good purpose in life, at least as far as Ethernet goes.

 

You can get a gigabit switch (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108, which AT&T supplies when necessary to complete a configuration) and connect your computer and NAS directly to the switch, and connect the switch to the RG.  Then you can enjoy full gigabit Ethernet between your in-home networking devices.  The 100 Mbps connection on the RG doesn't matter a whole lot when you're going to an Internet connection at less than 25 Mbps.

 

EDIT: Correction to an above post, Cat 6 does not support 10 Gigabit Ethernet, the highest Ethernet standard it supports is Gigabit (just like Cat 5e).  If you want 10 Gigabit support, you have to go with Cat 6a.

 

Basically, this makes the Cat 6 standard a cable without a good purpose in life, at least as far as Ethernet goes.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Gateway configuration/speed issues?

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Feb 20, 2014 7:15:45 PM
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JefferMC wrote:

You can get a gigabit switch (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108, which AT&T supplies when necessary to complete a configuration) and connect your computer and NAS directly to the switch, and connect the switch to the RG.  Then you can enjoy full gigabit Ethernet between your in-home networking devices.  The 100 Mbps connection on the RG doesn't matter a whole lot when you're going to an Internet connection at less than 25 Mbps.

 

EDIT: Correction to an above post, Cat 6 does not support 10 Gigabit Ethernet, the highest Ethernet standard it supports is Gigabit (just like Cat 5e).  If you want 10 Gigabit support, you have to go with Cat 6a.

 

Basically, this makes the Cat 6 standard a cable without a good purpose in life, at least as far as Ethernet goes.

 


Actually Category 6 cables are capable of supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet, albeit at a reduced maximum length (30-50m - depending on the alien crosstalk environment). Category 6a has 10 Gigabit support without sacrificing the full 100m max length. 


JefferMC wrote:

You can get a gigabit switch (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108, which AT&T supplies when necessary to complete a configuration) and connect your computer and NAS directly to the switch, and connect the switch to the RG.  Then you can enjoy full gigabit Ethernet between your in-home networking devices.  The 100 Mbps connection on the RG doesn't matter a whole lot when you're going to an Internet connection at less than 25 Mbps.

 

EDIT: Correction to an above post, Cat 6 does not support 10 Gigabit Ethernet, the highest Ethernet standard it supports is Gigabit (just like Cat 5e).  If you want 10 Gigabit support, you have to go with Cat 6a.

 

Basically, this makes the Cat 6 standard a cable without a good purpose in life, at least as far as Ethernet goes.

 


Actually Category 6 cables are capable of supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet, albeit at a reduced maximum length (30-50m - depending on the alien crosstalk environment). Category 6a has 10 Gigabit support without sacrificing the full 100m max length. 

Re: Gateway configuration/speed issues?

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Feb 20, 2014 7:26:01 PM
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True, but apparently every home turns out to be an alien environment. Smiley Very Happy

True, but apparently every home turns out to be an alien environment. Smiley Very Happy

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Feb 20, 2014 8:29:46 PM
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Thanks a bunch guys! I'll elaborate a bit on just what I'm trying to do.

 

Years ago I converted a bunch of old super 8 home movies to MPEG-2 and similar formats, then later similar with a more modern video camera, plus I've downloaded a ton of funny and unusual Youtube vids. As you know you can plug in a video camera to many more up to date TV's, but that's a hassle so I first edited them on my desktop PC, then burned originally to CD's, then as the technology evolved to DVD's, and lately BlueRay. An acceptable solution to play them on a big screen TV, but not ideal.

 

Last year I bought one of those large screen "smart" TV's, that among other things supports DLNA... so time to set up a little home network. I started out using a WiFi router. Sadly often the playback was choppy or the video froze and I had to restart, which gets to be a real pain if it happens several times in a row.

 

A couple days ago I had AT&T come out because my PC only had WiFi from the AT&T supplied Gateway and it lost the Internet connection quite often or just quit working, then came back an hour or more later. They installed a Ethernet cable between the Gateway and Computer, and I ran that to the NAS. As far as streaming videos from the NAS to the TV, problem solved.

 

The one issue remaining, why I started this thread is when transferring files between the PC and NAS it was awful slow.  It never dawned on me I could have my cake and eat it too. Thanks JefferMC for helping on this. I'll probably pick up a switch this weekend or order online.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks a bunch guys! I'll elaborate a bit on just what I'm trying to do.

 

Years ago I converted a bunch of old super 8 home movies to MPEG-2 and similar formats, then later similar with a more modern video camera, plus I've downloaded a ton of funny and unusual Youtube vids. As you know you can plug in a video camera to many more up to date TV's, but that's a hassle so I first edited them on my desktop PC, then burned originally to CD's, then as the technology evolved to DVD's, and lately BlueRay. An acceptable solution to play them on a big screen TV, but not ideal.

 

Last year I bought one of those large screen "smart" TV's, that among other things supports DLNA... so time to set up a little home network. I started out using a WiFi router. Sadly often the playback was choppy or the video froze and I had to restart, which gets to be a real pain if it happens several times in a row.

 

A couple days ago I had AT&T come out because my PC only had WiFi from the AT&T supplied Gateway and it lost the Internet connection quite often or just quit working, then came back an hour or more later. They installed a Ethernet cable between the Gateway and Computer, and I ran that to the NAS. As far as streaming videos from the NAS to the TV, problem solved.

 

The one issue remaining, why I started this thread is when transferring files between the PC and NAS it was awful slow.  It never dawned on me I could have my cake and eat it too. Thanks JefferMC for helping on this. I'll probably pick up a switch this weekend or order online.

 

 

 

 

 

Re: Gateway configuration/speed issues?

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Feb 21, 2014 4:51:39 AM
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Even Blu Ray discs only have a maximum rate of 56 Mbps, so I would expect that 100 Mbps would be quite adequate for streaming your video collection, assuming no other traffic on those network legs.

 

The data rate for HDMI is much higher because there is no compression going on there.  10 Gbps Ethernet isn't even adequate for carrying the requirements of a 4K picture.

 

Even Blu Ray discs only have a maximum rate of 56 Mbps, so I would expect that 100 Mbps would be quite adequate for streaming your video collection, assuming no other traffic on those network legs.

 

The data rate for HDMI is much higher because there is no compression going on there.  10 Gbps Ethernet isn't even adequate for carrying the requirements of a 4K picture.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Feb 21, 2014 12:28:39 PM
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I ran out and got a D-Link 5-Port Gigabit Switch and hooked it up. Works great. As reported previously transfering files between desktop PC and NAS before averaged around 10 megabytes a second. Now it averages about 78 megabytes a second and a couple times as high as 99 megabytes a second or on a par with USB 3.0 in my test results.

I ran out and got a D-Link 5-Port Gigabit Switch and hooked it up. Works great. As reported previously transfering files between desktop PC and NAS before averaged around 10 megabytes a second. Now it averages about 78 megabytes a second and a couple times as high as 99 megabytes a second or on a par with USB 3.0 in my test results.

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