Ask a question
Search in U-verse Forums

U-verse Forums

Reply
Highlighted
Posted Nov 16, 2010
8:24:23 PM
View profile
Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)
U-Verse just arrived in my neighborhood (new VRAD just went in >500 feet away) and I'm considering making the switch. I have a few questions first however. I live in a newer two story home with a basement, that is wired with coax throughout (but not CAT5). Due to the nature of my work, it is essential that I have a hard line to the internet in my office on the top floor. My question is; even though the cable/phone/etc comes into the house in the basement, is it possible for the installer to install the residential gateway in my office? Will he need to run CAT5, and if so, could he simply terminate it in a dual coax/ethernet wall plate without cutting any additional holes in my walls (using the existing cable as a guide to feed the new cable)? For the sake of simplicity, would it be possible to run the one length of CAT5 to my office, and then have all of the other boxes (four in total, two HD) running off of coax? I'm trying to get a feel for how many holes need to be drilled in my floors and/or walls to make this work (I'm not that eager to switch if the answer is more than one or two). I realize that coax can be used by itself with an adapter of some sort, but from what I've read, that really isn't the way to go if you can help it. Doing it that way, could the RG be placed in the upstairs office? I'd rather have CAT5 directly to it, but if it can be done simpler with coax (assuming the RG can be upstairs) I'd be willing to compromise. Sorry if this has been asked before, but I couldn't find my specific issue addressed previously (if it has been, feel free to forward me there). Thank you in advance for your assistance.
U-Verse just arrived in my neighborhood (new VRAD just went in >500 feet away) and I'm considering making the switch. I have a few questions first however. I live in a newer two story home with a basement, that is wired with coax throughout (but not CAT5). Due to the nature of my work, it is essential that I have a hard line to the internet in my office on the top floor. My question is; even though the cable/phone/etc comes into the house in the basement, is it possible for the installer to install the residential gateway in my office? Will he need to run CAT5, and if so, could he simply terminate it in a dual coax/ethernet wall plate without cutting any additional holes in my walls (using the existing cable as a guide to feed the new cable)? For the sake of simplicity, would it be possible to run the one length of CAT5 to my office, and then have all of the other boxes (four in total, two HD) running off of coax? I'm trying to get a feel for how many holes need to be drilled in my floors and/or walls to make this work (I'm not that eager to switch if the answer is more than one or two). I realize that coax can be used by itself with an adapter of some sort, but from what I've read, that really isn't the way to go if you can help it. Doing it that way, could the RG be placed in the upstairs office? I'd rather have CAT5 directly to it, but if it can be done simpler with coax (assuming the RG can be upstairs) I'd be willing to compromise. Sorry if this has been asked before, but I couldn't find my specific issue addressed previously (if it has been, feel free to forward me there). Thank you in advance for your assistance.
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Solved
Nov 21, 2010 8:12:34 AM
0
(0)
Expert

RBfKC10 wrote:

 

If I run that cable from the RG to my office (terminating in a wall plug), can I plug a router in, and feed both a set top box, and my computer?

 

You would want to use a switch, not a router.

 

The recommended switch that will allow the set top box (STB) to run properly as well as not interfere with the computer's traffic is the NetGear GS108 (8 port) or GS105 (5 port).

 

Accepted Solution

Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

5,123 views
16 replies
(0) Me too
(0) Me too
Reply
View all replies
(16)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Solved
Nov 16, 2010 8:33:47 PM
0
(0)
ACE - Expert
Edited by RCSMG on Nov 16, 2010 at 8:36:21 PM

 


RBfKC10 wrote:
U-Verse just arrived in my neighborhood (new VRAD just went in >500 feet away) and I'm considering making the switch. I have a few questions first however. I live in a newer two story home with a basement, that is wired with coax throughout (but not CAT5). Due to the nature of my work, it is essential that I have a hard line to the internet in my office on the top floor. My question is; even though the cable/phone/etc comes into the house in the basement, is it possible for the installer to install the residential gateway in my office? Yes, you should be able to have the RG placed in your office.  It could mean that there might have to be a hole drilled in order to facilitate that.  It depends on where the NID is placed in relation to your office.
Will he need to run CAT5, and if so, could he simply terminate it in a dual coax/ethernet wall plate without cutting any additional holes in my walls (using the existing cable as a guide to feed the new cable)?  The tech will run Cat5 from the NID to the RG.  He/she will probably replace the connectors on the existing coax cables.  Since your house is new, the coax cables should be good.
For the sake of simplicity, would it be possible to run the one length of CAT5 to my office, and then have all of the other boxes (four in total, two HD) running off of coax? I'm trying to get a feel for how many holes need to be drilled in my floors and/or walls to make this work (I'm not that eager to switch if the answer is more than one or two). I realize that coax can be used by itself with an adapter of some sort, but from what I've read, that really isn't the way to go if you can help it. Doing it that way, could the RG be placed in the upstairs office? I'd rather have CAT5 directly to it, but if it can be done simpler with coax (assuming the RG can be upstairs) I'd be willing to compromise. Sorry if this has been asked before, but I couldn't find my specific issue addressed previously (if it has been, feel free to forward me there). Thank you in advance for your assistance.

The tech should be able to grant your requests.  I think your install should go quite well, but make sure all of your services work to your satisfaction before the tech leaves.

 

 


RBfKC10 wrote:
U-Verse just arrived in my neighborhood (new VRAD just went in >500 feet away) and I'm considering making the switch. I have a few questions first however. I live in a newer two story home with a basement, that is wired with coax throughout (but not CAT5). Due to the nature of my work, it is essential that I have a hard line to the internet in my office on the top floor. My question is; even though the cable/phone/etc comes into the house in the basement, is it possible for the installer to install the residential gateway in my office? Yes, you should be able to have the RG placed in your office.  It could mean that there might have to be a hole drilled in order to facilitate that.  It depends on where the NID is placed in relation to your office.
Will he need to run CAT5, and if so, could he simply terminate it in a dual coax/ethernet wall plate without cutting any additional holes in my walls (using the existing cable as a guide to feed the new cable)?  The tech will run Cat5 from the NID to the RG.  He/she will probably replace the connectors on the existing coax cables.  Since your house is new, the coax cables should be good.
For the sake of simplicity, would it be possible to run the one length of CAT5 to my office, and then have all of the other boxes (four in total, two HD) running off of coax? I'm trying to get a feel for how many holes need to be drilled in my floors and/or walls to make this work (I'm not that eager to switch if the answer is more than one or two). I realize that coax can be used by itself with an adapter of some sort, but from what I've read, that really isn't the way to go if you can help it. Doing it that way, could the RG be placed in the upstairs office? I'd rather have CAT5 directly to it, but if it can be done simpler with coax (assuming the RG can be upstairs) I'd be willing to compromise. Sorry if this has been asked before, but I couldn't find my specific issue addressed previously (if it has been, feel free to forward me there). Thank you in advance for your assistance.

The tech should be able to grant your requests.  I think your install should go quite well, but make sure all of your services work to your satisfaction before the tech leaves.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
2 of 17 (5,117 Views)
Solution
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 16, 2010 8:47:09 PM
0
(0)
Teacher
Thank you.
Thank you.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

3 of 17 (5,099 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 20, 2010 4:21:56 AM
0
(0)
Teacher
Edited by RBfKC10 on Nov 20, 2010 at 4:48:15 AM

I've decided to go with U-Verse, and I've already ordered. I have a few more questions first though (or rather, I'd like to know if I have the correct idea). I see two possible scenarios NID (located in basement) -> Ethernet Switch -> RG in Second Floor Office (with a new run of CAT5E I'll put in) -> Living Room Television (with a new run of CAT5E I'll put in) (all other boxes being run on coax) or NID -> RG in Basement -> Cat5E run to living room and office (all other boxes being run on coax) I'd like the RG in my office so that I can more easily service it, but if it is simpler to do it the other way, I'm willing to (the important thing is that my office and living room have an ethernet line for qualities sake). Am I correct in assuming that a switch can even be attached to the NID, or will it not work like that? Thank you in advance for your assistance (I know I marked this resolved, but that was before I decided to pre-wire my house on my own)

 

Edit:

(Sorry, the diagram I drew seems to have borked)

 

To simplify further, if possible I'd like to attach the NID directly to an ethernet switch. From there, I'd run cables (attached to the switch) to the RG in my office upstairs, and to my living room set top box. I'd have every other television run on Coax (the RG can manage this through the coax connection in my office, correct?). If that will not work, I'd like the RG in the basement, directly attached to CAT5E cables I'll run to the living room, and my second floor office (I'm pretty certain that this would be acceptable). The first solution is preferable, but the second one would be acceptable as well. If it makes a difference, I'm also signed up for U-Verse voice. Will that work attached to the phone jack in my office, or does that need a line directly from the outside (running all the other phone jacks in the house)?

I've decided to go with U-Verse, and I've already ordered. I have a few more questions first though (or rather, I'd like to know if I have the correct idea). I see two possible scenarios NID (located in basement) -> Ethernet Switch -> RG in Second Floor Office (with a new run of CAT5E I'll put in) -> Living Room Television (with a new run of CAT5E I'll put in) (all other boxes being run on coax) or NID -> RG in Basement -> Cat5E run to living room and office (all other boxes being run on coax) I'd like the RG in my office so that I can more easily service it, but if it is simpler to do it the other way, I'm willing to (the important thing is that my office and living room have an ethernet line for qualities sake). Am I correct in assuming that a switch can even be attached to the NID, or will it not work like that? Thank you in advance for your assistance (I know I marked this resolved, but that was before I decided to pre-wire my house on my own)

 

Edit:

(Sorry, the diagram I drew seems to have borked)

 

To simplify further, if possible I'd like to attach the NID directly to an ethernet switch. From there, I'd run cables (attached to the switch) to the RG in my office upstairs, and to my living room set top box. I'd have every other television run on Coax (the RG can manage this through the coax connection in my office, correct?). If that will not work, I'd like the RG in the basement, directly attached to CAT5E cables I'll run to the living room, and my second floor office (I'm pretty certain that this would be acceptable). The first solution is preferable, but the second one would be acceptable as well. If it makes a difference, I'm also signed up for U-Verse voice. Will that work attached to the phone jack in my office, or does that need a line directly from the outside (running all the other phone jacks in the house)?

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
4 of 17 (4,918 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Solved
Nov 20, 2010 8:42:49 PM
0
(0)
Expert

NID line needs to run directly to the RG; you can attach a swtch from the RG and go from there.  RG only has 4 Ethernet ports.

 

Voice is plugged into the back of the RG as well (2 line ports).

 

Yes, TVs connected via coax are backfed from the NID.  All coax needs to have NEW ends/connectors installed (each end, even behind/front of wall plates).

 

You will not be able to just connect coax to a TV and get UV; each TV requires an STB.  If there are any coax lines you might want to connect for TV later, have the tech do that while he/she is there.  That way, you can move STBs to other rooms at a later date if you wish.

NID line needs to run directly to the RG; you can attach a swtch from the RG and go from there.  RG only has 4 Ethernet ports.

 

Voice is plugged into the back of the RG as well (2 line ports).

 

Yes, TVs connected via coax are backfed from the NID.  All coax needs to have NEW ends/connectors installed (each end, even behind/front of wall plates).

 

You will not be able to just connect coax to a TV and get UV; each TV requires an STB.  If there are any coax lines you might want to connect for TV later, have the tech do that while he/she is there.  That way, you can move STBs to other rooms at a later date if you wish.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

5 of 17 (4,846 Views)
Solution
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 3:38:59 AM
0
(0)
Teacher
Edited by RBfKC10 on Nov 21, 2010 at 3:42:56 AM

Thank you. I guess the best scenario here would be the RG in the basement (feeding the phone), with a direct CAT5E cable going to my living room (first floor) and my office (second floor), and Coax handling the rest of the house (with boxes on each TV of course)? That way, my office has the higher quality ethernet line, as does the living room television. Is this a good idea?

 

One final question (sorry, I'm new to IP delivered services, though I have plenty of coax/pots experience). If I run that cable from the RG to my office (terminating in a wall plug), can I plug a router in, and feed both a set top box, and my computer?

 

 

Thank you. I guess the best scenario here would be the RG in the basement (feeding the phone), with a direct CAT5E cable going to my living room (first floor) and my office (second floor), and Coax handling the rest of the house (with boxes on each TV of course)? That way, my office has the higher quality ethernet line, as does the living room television. Is this a good idea?

 

One final question (sorry, I'm new to IP delivered services, though I have plenty of coax/pots experience). If I run that cable from the RG to my office (terminating in a wall plug), can I plug a router in, and feed both a set top box, and my computer?

 

 

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
6 of 17 (4,817 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Solved
Nov 21, 2010 8:12:34 AM
0
(0)
Expert

RBfKC10 wrote:

 

If I run that cable from the RG to my office (terminating in a wall plug), can I plug a router in, and feed both a set top box, and my computer?

 

You would want to use a switch, not a router.

 

The recommended switch that will allow the set top box (STB) to run properly as well as not interfere with the computer's traffic is the NetGear GS108 (8 port) or GS105 (5 port).

 


RBfKC10 wrote:

 

If I run that cable from the RG to my office (terminating in a wall plug), can I plug a router in, and feed both a set top box, and my computer?

 

You would want to use a switch, not a router.

 

The recommended switch that will allow the set top box (STB) to run properly as well as not interfere with the computer's traffic is the NetGear GS108 (8 port) or GS105 (5 port).

 

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

7 of 17 (4,781 Views)
Solution
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 9:54:12 AM
0
(0)
Teacher
Thank you. AT&T will supply one, correct? If not, I need to order one rather shortly.
Thank you. AT&T will supply one, correct? If not, I need to order one rather shortly.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

8 of 17 (4,756 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 10:56:45 AM
0
(0)
Teacher
Edited by Gizmo99 on Nov 21, 2010 at 10:58:17 AM

My RG has 4 RJ45 outputs on the rear, I run 4 computers wired and 3 wireless off the RG. I only have Uverse TV and Internet no voip phone. In your situation I would run coax to all TV's then depending on how many computers you have to set up I would run RJ45 to each of them or possibly connect wirelessly to the RG.

My RG has 4 RJ45 outputs on the rear, I run 4 computers wired and 3 wireless off the RG. I only have Uverse TV and Internet no voip phone. In your situation I would run coax to all TV's then depending on how many computers you have to set up I would run RJ45 to each of them or possibly connect wirelessly to the RG.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
9 of 17 (4,742 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 11:20:14 AM
0
(0)
Expert

 


RBfKC10 wrote:
Thank you. AT&T will supply one, correct? If not, I need to order one rather shortly.

The techs do carry GS108 switches on their truck, but they will only supply one if it's necessary to complete your installation.  If they are able to do it in a way that it's not required, then they won't supply one.

 

 

 


RBfKC10 wrote:
Thank you. AT&T will supply one, correct? If not, I need to order one rather shortly.

The techs do carry GS108 switches on their truck, but they will only supply one if it's necessary to complete your installation.  If they are able to do it in a way that it's not required, then they won't supply one.

 

 

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

10 of 17 (4,735 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 2:35:50 PM
0
(0)
Teacher
Edited by RBfKC10 on Nov 21, 2010 at 2:37:50 PM

@SomeJoe7777 - Is there any other way to get a set top box and multiple computers working in a single room (other than wireless, which I am unwilling to use)? I've decided not to pre-wire my house with CAT5E (The install date is coming, and a family member is no longer able to help). I've read elsewhere, and on here, that the installers will be able and willing to do it. Two runs of CAT5E (one from the basement to the first floor, and another to the second floor) shouldn't be a problem, should it? Can they refuse on the basis that the house is already wired with coax?

@SomeJoe7777 - Is there any other way to get a set top box and multiple computers working in a single room (other than wireless, which I am unwilling to use)? I've decided not to pre-wire my house with CAT5E (The install date is coming, and a family member is no longer able to help). I've read elsewhere, and on here, that the installers will be able and willing to do it. Two runs of CAT5E (one from the basement to the first floor, and another to the second floor) shouldn't be a problem, should it? Can they refuse on the basis that the house is already wired with coax?

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
11 of 17 (3,834 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 4:13:25 PM
0
(0)
Expert

The way the techs run wire varies from location to location throughout the country.  From what I have heard, in most cases if the coax is available and in good condition (i.e. passes testing), they will use the coax.  They will not run Cat5e for free if coax can be used.

 

If the coax cannot be used because of technical issues or because it is already in use by another service, then they will run either more coax or Cat5e for you, but they will not fish walls to do that.  They will run the wire on the outside of the house, or under carpet & along baseboards.

 

In some locations, they will run Cat5e on request for a charge per drop -- I have read $75 per drop.

 

You will have to ask your installer for the particulars to your location.

 

The way the techs run wire varies from location to location throughout the country.  From what I have heard, in most cases if the coax is available and in good condition (i.e. passes testing), they will use the coax.  They will not run Cat5e for free if coax can be used.

 

If the coax cannot be used because of technical issues or because it is already in use by another service, then they will run either more coax or Cat5e for you, but they will not fish walls to do that.  They will run the wire on the outside of the house, or under carpet & along baseboards.

 

In some locations, they will run Cat5e on request for a charge per drop -- I have read $75 per drop.

 

You will have to ask your installer for the particulars to your location.

 

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

12 of 17 (3,813 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 5:48:13 PM
0
(0)
Teacher

Since my house is new, I have a feeling that my coax is of high quality. This policy doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. Since a coax connection can't be used for internet (there is no NIC in a computer that can handle it rather. I realize that it can carry IP traffic) what does AT&T expect U-Verse users to do for rooms that aren't located near the RG? Do they expect every computer/game console/etc away from the RG to use wireless? Since I've always had this type of equipment attached to a router, I don't have wireless adapters for them.

 

Would the installer carry something like this (http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Ethernet-Over-Coax-Adapter/dp/B0021W90W4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electr...) or this (http://www.amazon.com/Ethernet-Adapter-Network-Homes-Satellite/dp/B001RJMBZU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=el...)? I'm not so eager to have U-Verse that I'd go out and buy extra equipment to get it to work, and the primary internet room having to use wireless (or plug into the TV set top box. That isn't wise, if I've read correctly?) is a deal breaker.

 

Thank you for the patience in relation to all of my questions.

Since my house is new, I have a feeling that my coax is of high quality. This policy doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. Since a coax connection can't be used for internet (there is no NIC in a computer that can handle it rather. I realize that it can carry IP traffic) what does AT&T expect U-Verse users to do for rooms that aren't located near the RG? Do they expect every computer/game console/etc away from the RG to use wireless? Since I've always had this type of equipment attached to a router, I don't have wireless adapters for them.

 

Would the installer carry something like this (http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Ethernet-Over-Coax-Adapter/dp/B0021W90W4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1290390068&sr=1-2) or this (http://www.amazon.com/Ethernet-Adapter-Network-Homes-Satellite/dp/B001RJMBZU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1290390068&sr=1-3)? I'm not so eager to have U-Verse that I'd go out and buy extra equipment to get it to work, and the primary internet room having to use wireless (or plug into the TV set top box. That isn't wise, if I've read correctly?) is a deal breaker.

 

Thank you for the patience in relation to all of my questions.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

13 of 17 (3,800 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 6:15:11 PM
0
(0)
Expert

The installer will provide you with wireless adapters for your computers if you need them.

 

Some techs do carry Ethernet-over-powerline adapters that can be used to connect computers in another room if they can't use wireless.

 

If an STB is connected on coax, you can use the Cat5e port on the STB to run another device, but it's generally not recommended and not supported because the STB can have performance issues under this setup.

 

I don't think the installers generally carry Ethernet to coax bridges for use with computers.

 

The installer will provide you with wireless adapters for your computers if you need them.

 

Some techs do carry Ethernet-over-powerline adapters that can be used to connect computers in another room if they can't use wireless.

 

If an STB is connected on coax, you can use the Cat5e port on the STB to run another device, but it's generally not recommended and not supported because the STB can have performance issues under this setup.

 

I don't think the installers generally carry Ethernet to coax bridges for use with computers.

 

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

14 of 17 (3,787 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 6:43:55 PM
0
(0)
Master

Another possibility: The RG can be fed from the NID/NIB with phone line just like ADSL. If all your phone jacks are fed with individual home runs back to the basement and those lines are high enough quality (at least 2 twisted pairs) you might be able to place the RG in your office, feed it off the phone line, then back feed over the coax down to the basement and feed the rest of TVs in the home. Then plug your office computer directly into the RG's four port switch. Then all you need is a CAT5 run back to basement where you would use a 5 or 8 port ethernet switch to feed your other devices that need internet access. You might want to pull your wall plates for your phone jack and coax and check the type and quality of the cables. Also check to see if either the coax or phone lines have been run in conduit. If they are, that would greatly simplify running the new CAT5 back down to the basement. Sometimes another easy route from the second floor back to the basement would be down a cold air return duct if you have forced-air heat.

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________
How can you be in two places at once, when your not anywhere at all?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want to become a procrastinator, but I keep putting it off.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are three kinds of people, those that can count, and those that can't.

                              

Another possibility: The RG can be fed from the NID/NIB with phone line just like ADSL. If all your phone jacks are fed with individual home runs back to the basement and those lines are high enough quality (at least 2 twisted pairs) you might be able to place the RG in your office, feed it off the phone line, then back feed over the coax down to the basement and feed the rest of TVs in the home. Then plug your office computer directly into the RG's four port switch. Then all you need is a CAT5 run back to basement where you would use a 5 or 8 port ethernet switch to feed your other devices that need internet access. You might want to pull your wall plates for your phone jack and coax and check the type and quality of the cables. Also check to see if either the coax or phone lines have been run in conduit. If they are, that would greatly simplify running the new CAT5 back down to the basement. Sometimes another easy route from the second floor back to the basement would be down a cold air return duct if you have forced-air heat.

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________
How can you be in two places at once, when your not anywhere at all?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want to become a procrastinator, but I keep putting it off.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are three kinds of people, those that can count, and those that can't.

                               neon_sign.jpg

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

15 of 17 (3,776 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Nov 21, 2010 6:44:44 PM
0
(0)
Teacher
Edited by RBfKC10 on Nov 21, 2010 at 6:47:26 PM

@SomeJoe7777

It's not so much an issue of me not be able to use wireless, but rather that I won't. Since I technically have the capability, I doubt an installer is going to be willing to look the other way.  Well, whatever. The cost of the one coax to ethernet adapter is offset by the promotional savings anyway, so I guess there isn't any reason to cancel the service.

 

@Computer-Joe

I'll definitely have the installer look at that. Thank you for the suggestion.

 

 

Thank you for all the assistance everyone. Consider my case closed.

@SomeJoe7777

It's not so much an issue of me not be able to use wireless, but rather that I won't. Since I technically have the capability, I doubt an installer is going to be willing to look the other way.  Well, whatever. The cost of the one coax to ethernet adapter is offset by the promotional savings anyway, so I guess there isn't any reason to cancel the service.

 

@Computer-Joe

I'll definitely have the installer look at that. Thank you for the suggestion.

 

 

Thank you for all the assistance everyone. Consider my case closed.

Re: Question about U-Verse Installation (RG placement / Coax vs CAT5)

[ Edited ]
16 of 17 (3,775 Views)
0
(0)
  • Rate this reply
View profile
Dec 2, 2010 10:45:35 AM
0
(0)
Teacher

I had U-Verse installed a few days ago, and I figured I should give an update. Specifically, I'd like to update you guys on the performance of the Actiontec HCB1000 HPNA to Ethernet Bridge that I purchased. On the bright side, it does work in the sense that it will feed a router, and a set top box, which gives you a wired connection to the internet in a room that otherwise wouldn't have one. Unfortunately, while I get the full 24/3 (or is it 4? I haven't tested in a while) with a computer connected directly to the RG, I only get 15/0.5 while connected to the HCB1000. My wiring is fine, and I've made sure to test with all TV boxes off (to maximize bandwidth available) so I know it is the box (or U-Verse) to blame. This little box might work better with cable internet, but with U-Verse, it seems like the upload bandwidth just isn't there over HPNA, and with my need to video conference, 0.5 up just isn't going to cut it. For what it's worth, I didn't notice any problems while running the HCB1000 (like people experience when using the set top box as a bridge), but then again, I only ran it long enough to figure out that it wouldn't work before I put it back in the box to be shipped back. Your mileage may vary.

 

I'm not asking for help, just reporting the results I've had with the HCB1000. If you absolutely have to have a hard line in a room that is far away from the RG, and you won't use wireless (or can't), the HCB1000 can work. If you need that upload bandwidth though, I would look for another solution. I'd definitely try ethernet over powerlines first, but if you aren't on the same circuit, or you can't use one because you are in an apartment or something, the HCB1000 will work (albeit not particularly well if you need your upload bandwidth).

I had U-Verse installed a few days ago, and I figured I should give an update. Specifically, I'd like to update you guys on the performance of the Actiontec HCB1000 HPNA to Ethernet Bridge that I purchased. On the bright side, it does work in the sense that it will feed a router, and a set top box, which gives you a wired connection to the internet in a room that otherwise wouldn't have one. Unfortunately, while I get the full 24/3 (or is it 4? I haven't tested in a while) with a computer connected directly to the RG, I only get 15/0.5 while connected to the HCB1000. My wiring is fine, and I've made sure to test with all TV boxes off (to maximize bandwidth available) so I know it is the box (or U-Verse) to blame. This little box might work better with cable internet, but with U-Verse, it seems like the upload bandwidth just isn't there over HPNA, and with my need to video conference, 0.5 up just isn't going to cut it. For what it's worth, I didn't notice any problems while running the HCB1000 (like people experience when using the set top box as a bridge), but then again, I only ran it long enough to figure out that it wouldn't work before I put it back in the box to be shipped back. Your mileage may vary.

 

I'm not asking for help, just reporting the results I've had with the HCB1000. If you absolutely have to have a hard line in a room that is far away from the RG, and you won't use wireless (or can't), the HCB1000 can work. If you need that upload bandwidth though, I would look for another solution. I'd definitely try ethernet over powerlines first, but if you aren't on the same circuit, or you can't use one because you are in an apartment or something, the HCB1000 will work (albeit not particularly well if you need your upload bandwidth).

HCB1000

17 of 17 (3,631 Views)
Advanced
You must be signed in to add attachments
Share this post
Share this post