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Posted Mar 12, 2014
2:03:59 PM
Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?
 
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Mar 13, 2014 10:07:25 AM
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ACE - Expert
janisdavis - You can connect the second TV with a COAX cable & tune to channel 3 for SD.

You can connect the current TV with component cables and the second TV with a long HDMI cable for HD on both.

For HDMI on both you need a splitter. Here is a source for splitter and long HDMI cable - http://sewelldirect.com/Sewell-HDMI-1x2-Splitter-v13b.asp?ad_source=GoogleAdWords&ad_medium=PPC&ad_term=HDMI%20%2Bsplitter&ad_campaign=53983803&ad_group=2074889043&ad_network=search&ad_creative=7153161963&gclid=CKe_ir2ii6gCFUiK4AoduEbyCQ

Do you want to control the DVR from the bedroom? Does the IR travel from the bedroom to the DVR? If not here is a RF remote. These are available from Amazon and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

The only speed bump I see would be if the two TVs use the same IR, any buttons would affect both TVs at the same time (one via IR & the other via RF)

With the loss of the Logitech Harmony Model 300 & the general malaise surrounding the Harmony Line of remotes, I started poking around the URC line of remotes to handle cases beyond the U-verse standard remote capabilities.. Here is what I found.

They have a couple of really inexpensive ones. But the reviews seem to indicate that they do NOT support U-verse. (looks like the RCA RCRP05BR is still first choice in the low price category).They, also, have very expensive models, that I would not consider.

The sweet spot is RF10 or RF20 - They have similar functionality and learning capability and price and RF capability and do support U-verse (per a reviewer).

The RF10 has a “shift “ button that nearly doubles the button availability as well as eight extra physical buttons. A button supports one function without pressing shift & another function immediately after the shift button is pressed.

The RF20 adds buttons with a screen (same as my Harmony 700) I find I only want to use the first screen, which is similar to the ”shift button” concept.

Maybe, you select the RF10 or RF20 based on whether you prefer the shift button or the LCD screen for added buttons.

The programming uses only the remote button pushing via codes or searching, similar to the U-verse remote or learning from the original remote (which is only available on the U-verse point anywhere remote). Some find it difficult to program, some do not.

A big adder is RF capability. It is probably a better choice (when the RF receiver is also purchased) than the U-verse point anywhere remote, in most cases.

It does NOT have pairing, (like the U-verse remote) so, you cannot have two separate RF systems for two u-verse STBs. If you happen to have a very close neighbor that has the same remote with U-verse, each would control both STBs.

Reviews seem to indicate both the RF and IR are very powerful. Some expressed concern about two remotes controlling two devices (due to both devices being “in range”). This limits it to one U-verse STB. The limit includes IR and RF because the remote always sends both RF and IR. If RF and IR could be turned off by device, it could control two STBs (one IR {visible} and one RF {hidden}).

The RF/IR converter does have a single large IR blaster and individual, paste-on blasters. But, the individual ones are NOT assignable to specific devices. If they were, it could control multiple u-verse STBs.

If it had either of these capabilities to control more than one of the same device (specifically - U-verse STBs), I would probably get one. If I could choose IR/RF by device, I could control a visible STB (via IR) and a hidden STB (via RF). If I could assign a tape-on blaster to a device button, then I could control two or more hidden STBs.

The eight extra buttons at the bottom are labeled as surround system. It always seems a struggle with the U-verse remote on how to handle the volume button. This allows for flexibility in having a button for TV volume & another for surround sound volume.

The remote is device oriented. It introduces the concept of “activity” by allowing controlling features on one device while another device is active. Similar to the U-verse remote, but I believe it is more specific/flexible. It , also, can turn on multiple devices with a single button press.

If you have a device with separate on/off IR (not toggle), the RF10 has the separate buttons to allow selection, based on that detail. This is powerful for when two devices get out of synch on start-up (Like the U-verse OK button).

If this writeup piques your interest in the URC RF remotes, be sure to read the reviews and questions in Amazon, as well as the user manual at the URC site to see if there are any speed bumps in the way of your needs. - http://www.universalremote.com/pdf/Manual_RF10.pdf

Note that this info was derived from Amazon postings and the URC user manuals. NOT personal experience with using a RF10 or RF20 remote.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
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Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 12, 2014 2:11:37 PM
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janisdavis - Can you say more?? Each household can only have one DVR, but that is all that is needed. Each addl STB has full recording feature access to the DVR. You do need an STB for each TV that you want to watch a unique program. If you want to watch only one program at a time, but have two TVs, there are ways to make that work with one DVR.
janisdavis - Can you say more?? Each household can only have one DVR, but that is all that is needed. Each addl STB has full recording feature access to the DVR. You do need an STB for each TV that you want to watch a unique program. If you want to watch only one program at a time, but have two TVs, there are ways to make that work with one DVR.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 7:55:27 AM
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How do I watch one TV at a time with one DVR?

 

How do I watch one TV at a time with one DVR?

 

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 8:02:32 AM
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Edited by skeeterintexas on Mar 13, 2014 at 8:06:55 AM

Each TV must have an ATT provided box.  One of those boxes will be a DVR. 

 

Each additional TV will have a Set Top Box (STB) which has most of the capabilities of the DVR...you can program it, watch recordings, etc.  It works in conjunction with the DVR.

 

For example, you have a 1 bedroom apt. and want Uverse in the LR, BR and kitchen.  You would have ONE DVR and two STBs.  You would be able to set/watch/erase recordings on all three.  The only problem would be if the main DVR goes out.

 

Perhaps if you could elaborate on your current situation, we could offer more detailed information.

 

Each TV must have an ATT provided box.  One of those boxes will be a DVR. 

 

Each additional TV will have a Set Top Box (STB) which has most of the capabilities of the DVR...you can program it, watch recordings, etc.  It works in conjunction with the DVR.

 

For example, you have a 1 bedroom apt. and want Uverse in the LR, BR and kitchen.  You would have ONE DVR and two STBs.  You would be able to set/watch/erase recordings on all three.  The only problem would be if the main DVR goes out.

 

Perhaps if you could elaborate on your current situation, we could offer more detailed information.

 

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 8:15:37 AM
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janisdavis - Re: How do I watch one TV at a time with one DVR?

Sounds like you are thinking that recording on the DVR blocks viewing on the DVR. It does not.

With "just" a DVR -
You can watch a live show and record three others, all at the same time.
If you do not want to watch one you can record four.
If you watch one that was previously recorded, you can record four.

THink of the recording and watching as if it were two separate STBs
janisdavis - Re: How do I watch one TV at a time with one DVR?

Sounds like you are thinking that recording on the DVR blocks viewing on the DVR. It does not.

With "just" a DVR -
You can watch a live show and record three others, all at the same time.
If you do not want to watch one you can record four.
If you watch one that was previously recorded, you can record four.

THink of the recording and watching as if it were two separate STBs
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 8:24:01 AM
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ACE - Master
Edited by skeeterintexas on Mar 13, 2014 at 8:24:42 AM

You have 4 streams coming into your home. 

 

Like aviewer said, you can watch/record a combination of those streams.

You have 4 streams coming into your home. 

 

Like aviewer said, you can watch/record a combination of those streams.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 9:46:50 AM
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No I want to know if I can run two TV's with one DVR.  I only watch one TV at a time.

 

No I want to know if I can run two TV's with one DVR.  I only watch one TV at a time.

 

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 9:54:56 AM
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ACE - Master
Edited by skeeterintexas on Mar 13, 2014 at 9:57:05 AM

janisdavis wrote:

No I want to know if I can run two TV's with one DVR.  I only watch one TV at a time.

 


Yes...but you will need a second box (which will be a STB) on the second TV.

 

..OR...

 

you can run wiring from the one DVR to a second TV but someone else will have to chime in on how to do that.


janisdavis wrote:

No I want to know if I can run two TV's with one DVR.  I only watch one TV at a time.

 


Yes...but you will need a second box (which will be a STB) on the second TV.

 

..OR...

 

you can run wiring from the one DVR to a second TV but someone else will have to chime in on how to do that.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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Mar 13, 2014 10:07:25 AM
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janisdavis - You can connect the second TV with a COAX cable & tune to channel 3 for SD.

You can connect the current TV with component cables and the second TV with a long HDMI cable for HD on both.

For HDMI on both you need a splitter. Here is a source for splitter and long HDMI cable - http://sewelldirect.com/Sewell-HDMI-1x2-Splitter-v13b.asp?ad_source=GoogleAdWords&ad_medium=PPC&ad_t...

Do you want to control the DVR from the bedroom? Does the IR travel from the bedroom to the DVR? If not here is a RF remote. These are available from Amazon and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

The only speed bump I see would be if the two TVs use the same IR, any buttons would affect both TVs at the same time (one via IR & the other via RF)

With the loss of the Logitech Harmony Model 300 & the general malaise surrounding the Harmony Line of remotes, I started poking around the URC line of remotes to handle cases beyond the U-verse standard remote capabilities.. Here is what I found.

They have a couple of really inexpensive ones. But the reviews seem to indicate that they do NOT support U-verse. (looks like the RCA RCRP05BR is still first choice in the low price category).They, also, have very expensive models, that I would not consider.

The sweet spot is RF10 or RF20 - They have similar functionality and learning capability and price and RF capability and do support U-verse (per a reviewer).

The RF10 has a “shift “ button that nearly doubles the button availability as well as eight extra physical buttons. A button supports one function without pressing shift & another function immediately after the shift button is pressed.

The RF20 adds buttons with a screen (same as my Harmony 700) I find I only want to use the first screen, which is similar to the ”shift button” concept.

Maybe, you select the RF10 or RF20 based on whether you prefer the shift button or the LCD screen for added buttons.

The programming uses only the remote button pushing via codes or searching, similar to the U-verse remote or learning from the original remote (which is only available on the U-verse point anywhere remote). Some find it difficult to program, some do not.

A big adder is RF capability. It is probably a better choice (when the RF receiver is also purchased) than the U-verse point anywhere remote, in most cases.

It does NOT have pairing, (like the U-verse remote) so, you cannot have two separate RF systems for two u-verse STBs. If you happen to have a very close neighbor that has the same remote with U-verse, each would control both STBs.

Reviews seem to indicate both the RF and IR are very powerful. Some expressed concern about two remotes controlling two devices (due to both devices being “in range”). This limits it to one U-verse STB. The limit includes IR and RF because the remote always sends both RF and IR. If RF and IR could be turned off by device, it could control two STBs (one IR {visible} and one RF {hidden}).

The RF/IR converter does have a single large IR blaster and individual, paste-on blasters. But, the individual ones are NOT assignable to specific devices. If they were, it could control multiple u-verse STBs.

If it had either of these capabilities to control more than one of the same device (specifically - U-verse STBs), I would probably get one. If I could choose IR/RF by device, I could control a visible STB (via IR) and a hidden STB (via RF). If I could assign a tape-on blaster to a device button, then I could control two or more hidden STBs.

The eight extra buttons at the bottom are labeled as surround system. It always seems a struggle with the U-verse remote on how to handle the volume button. This allows for flexibility in having a button for TV volume & another for surround sound volume.

The remote is device oriented. It introduces the concept of “activity” by allowing controlling features on one device while another device is active. Similar to the U-verse remote, but I believe it is more specific/flexible. It , also, can turn on multiple devices with a single button press.

If you have a device with separate on/off IR (not toggle), the RF10 has the separate buttons to allow selection, based on that detail. This is powerful for when two devices get out of synch on start-up (Like the U-verse OK button).

If this writeup piques your interest in the URC RF remotes, be sure to read the reviews and questions in Amazon, as well as the user manual at the URC site to see if there are any speed bumps in the way of your needs. - http://www.universalremote.com/pdf/Manual_RF10.pdf

Note that this info was derived from Amazon postings and the URC user manuals. NOT personal experience with using a RF10 or RF20 remote.
janisdavis - You can connect the second TV with a COAX cable & tune to channel 3 for SD.

You can connect the current TV with component cables and the second TV with a long HDMI cable for HD on both.

For HDMI on both you need a splitter. Here is a source for splitter and long HDMI cable - http://sewelldirect.com/Sewell-HDMI-1x2-Splitter-v13b.asp?ad_source=GoogleAdWords&ad_medium=PPC&ad_term=HDMI%20%2Bsplitter&ad_campaign=53983803&ad_group=2074889043&ad_network=search&ad_creative=7153161963&gclid=CKe_ir2ii6gCFUiK4AoduEbyCQ

Do you want to control the DVR from the bedroom? Does the IR travel from the bedroom to the DVR? If not here is a RF remote. These are available from Amazon and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

The only speed bump I see would be if the two TVs use the same IR, any buttons would affect both TVs at the same time (one via IR & the other via RF)

With the loss of the Logitech Harmony Model 300 & the general malaise surrounding the Harmony Line of remotes, I started poking around the URC line of remotes to handle cases beyond the U-verse standard remote capabilities.. Here is what I found.

They have a couple of really inexpensive ones. But the reviews seem to indicate that they do NOT support U-verse. (looks like the RCA RCRP05BR is still first choice in the low price category).They, also, have very expensive models, that I would not consider.

The sweet spot is RF10 or RF20 - They have similar functionality and learning capability and price and RF capability and do support U-verse (per a reviewer).

The RF10 has a “shift “ button that nearly doubles the button availability as well as eight extra physical buttons. A button supports one function without pressing shift & another function immediately after the shift button is pressed.

The RF20 adds buttons with a screen (same as my Harmony 700) I find I only want to use the first screen, which is similar to the ”shift button” concept.

Maybe, you select the RF10 or RF20 based on whether you prefer the shift button or the LCD screen for added buttons.

The programming uses only the remote button pushing via codes or searching, similar to the U-verse remote or learning from the original remote (which is only available on the U-verse point anywhere remote). Some find it difficult to program, some do not.

A big adder is RF capability. It is probably a better choice (when the RF receiver is also purchased) than the U-verse point anywhere remote, in most cases.

It does NOT have pairing, (like the U-verse remote) so, you cannot have two separate RF systems for two u-verse STBs. If you happen to have a very close neighbor that has the same remote with U-verse, each would control both STBs.

Reviews seem to indicate both the RF and IR are very powerful. Some expressed concern about two remotes controlling two devices (due to both devices being “in range”). This limits it to one U-verse STB. The limit includes IR and RF because the remote always sends both RF and IR. If RF and IR could be turned off by device, it could control two STBs (one IR {visible} and one RF {hidden}).

The RF/IR converter does have a single large IR blaster and individual, paste-on blasters. But, the individual ones are NOT assignable to specific devices. If they were, it could control multiple u-verse STBs.

If it had either of these capabilities to control more than one of the same device (specifically - U-verse STBs), I would probably get one. If I could choose IR/RF by device, I could control a visible STB (via IR) and a hidden STB (via RF). If I could assign a tape-on blaster to a device button, then I could control two or more hidden STBs.

The eight extra buttons at the bottom are labeled as surround system. It always seems a struggle with the U-verse remote on how to handle the volume button. This allows for flexibility in having a button for TV volume & another for surround sound volume.

The remote is device oriented. It introduces the concept of “activity” by allowing controlling features on one device while another device is active. Similar to the U-verse remote, but I believe it is more specific/flexible. It , also, can turn on multiple devices with a single button press.

If you have a device with separate on/off IR (not toggle), the RF10 has the separate buttons to allow selection, based on that detail. This is powerful for when two devices get out of synch on start-up (Like the U-verse OK button).

If this writeup piques your interest in the URC RF remotes, be sure to read the reviews and questions in Amazon, as well as the user manual at the URC site to see if there are any speed bumps in the way of your needs. - http://www.universalremote.com/pdf/Manual_RF10.pdf

Note that this info was derived from Amazon postings and the URC user manuals. NOT personal experience with using a RF10 or RF20 remote.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Re: Do I really need two DVR's in a one-bedroom apartment?

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