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Why Plato’s Atlantis has refused to drown for thousands of years

Why Plato’s Atlantis has refused to drown for thousands of years

If Plato could only see his Atlantis now. When the Greek philosopher introduced the fictional island nation in his Socratic dialogues Timaeus and Critias—both of which were written a very long time ago in 360 B.C.—it served as a contrast to Athens as the ideal city-state. Without getting into the weeds of Plato’s philosophy as it relates to Atlantis, the island was a gods-gifted utopia that became corrupted by human greed and moral decline. Humans are just the worst, aren’t they?

In the beginning, Atlantis was a lush, virtuous kingdom that didn't define itself through wealth and power. Later, it became so drunk on its own power that it waged war on the more modest (but also more just and noble) Athens. But Atlantis' naval conquest was fended off by the upstart Athenians and, soon after, the gods punished Atlantis with an onslaught of earthquakes and floods that submerged it into the sea. Or so the story goes ...

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Re: Why Plato’s Atlantis has refused to drown for thousands of years

Why Plato’s Atlantis has refused to drown for thousands of years uncovers how the legend of Atlantis has continued long after its alleged underwater demise, including its latest appearance in Aquaman - where the city-state plays a major role in shaping Aquaman's identity.

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