Explore & discover

Helpful Links

Re: Google's Stadia – The Future of Gaming?

Administrator

Google's Stadia – The Future of Gaming?

Stadia.JPGGoogle's Stadia Releasing November 19th, 2019

 

Around a year ago, I was invited by Google to test out their games as a service platform – and, simply put, I was blown away by the results. Never could I have imagined having the ability to discover a new game, and then seconds later start playing it! No console or downloads required!

 

What is Google’s Stadia?

 

Stadia is an on-demand platform for games where you subscribe to a monthly service to have immediate access to numerous titles. While Microsoft’s Game Pass may be similar in nature, how they deliver the content couldn’t be farther apart.

 

Traditionally, when you want to play a game, you need to do a couple of things first:

 

  1. Own or have access to a modern console (or a high-end computer)
  2. Purchase a copy (Either physical or digital)
  3. Download the game and the seemingly endless day-1 updates
  4. Configure the game to work perfectly with your hardware (Driver updates, etc.)

 

With Stadia, you only have one step – jump right into the game.

 

How it works

 

Stadia works by offloading the ownership, physical storage, and hardware required to run to their cloud service. When you want to play a game, instead of running it locally, you’re instead streaming everything over the internet.

 

Look at it this way – you’re not actually playing the game. Think of the game as being ran on another computer and you’re merely taking control of that computer remotely and playing it on there. When you want to move your character, your inputs (keyboard or controller) are being sent to this remote computer which controls the character on that environment, which then the image on the screen comes back to render on yours.

 

Similar to how games can be shared on PlayStation (you can take control of a friend’s game to help them pass a level) except now you’re doing it on dedicated resources purpose built to handle this task.

 

How well does it work?

 

With only having access to their invitational testing last year, I can only speculate on the full release coming on November 19th, 2019. From my previous testing though, it worked spectacularly! I ran it with a hardwired Ethernet connection, download speed of 350 Mbps, and an upload of 12 Mbps playing Assasin’s Creed: Odyssey and experienced almost imperceptible lag in gameplay. The game loaded instantly, remembered my settings and progression, and honestly felt like I was playing it natively on my home computer.

 

For slower paced, or control forgiving games, the service was flawless. My hardware is a little outdated (Intel i7-590K, 16gb DDR5 Ram, and Nvidia 980) and seeing the high visual fidelity not possible on my rig coupled with the great frame-rate was mind-blowing.

 

Realistically, the only games I see as being incompatible with this service are twitch shooters, and multiplayer games where an additional 20ms of lag in response is devastating. For those die-hard Call of Duty fans out there, you’ll want to look elsewhere.

 

For the majority of games and gamers though, I don’t think you’ll have any problems.

 

Closing Thoughts

 

Pros:

  • You don’t need the best hardware to run these games. No more chasing down the latest and greatest (and spending a small fortune) hardware to play your highly anticipated games.
  • No downloading, no updating, no manual configuration. Just jump straight into the game.
  • Away from home? Stream your game anywhere your connection allows! Perfect portability!
  • No purchasing of games. With an active subscription, you get access to their entire collection.

Cons:

  • Not ideal for fast-response shooters or other input time sensitive games
  • You don’t own the games you’re playing. If you cancel subscription, your games are not available.
  • Requires a decent internet connection (minimum 10 Mbps, preferred 35 Mbps) and games are not available offline

 

Overall, if you’re looking to play a wide library of games without breaking the bank, this service is for you.

 

Are you going to give Google’s Stadia a try when it releases in North America on November 19th, 2019? Let me know your thoughts, speculations, and reviews below.

*I am an AT&T employee, and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinions.
Tags (1)
196 Views
Message 1 of 3
Highlighted
Solution
Accepted by topic author Administrator
Accepted by ATTKevin
‎12-04-2019 3:56 PM

Re: Google's Stadia – The Future of Gaming?

Quick correction on one of your cons...

"You don’t own the games you’re playing. If you cancel subscription, your games are not available."

Aside from the fact that you don't own games even on Steam or Epic game store .... if you buy a game on stadia and cancel your subscription you still have access to the game. The only games you lose access to are those you 'claimed' that are free to pro subscribers. (Same as PS Plus or Xbox Live... you can play them as long as you sub.) Once you resubscribe or 'directly purchase' the game, you can play it again.

 

But all that said, I'm on stadia, loving it. However, a couple of us (the proverbial internet 'us') that are on ATT Uverse (Gigapower... fiber... whatever you are calling FTTH now) are having lag issues when the controller is used wirelessly. Does not have delay when the PC is wired/wireless with keyboard/mouse or with stadia wired controller. Still chasing it down, but we've done everything from dmzplus/passhthrough, restarts, factory defaults, no other devices, WPA3 on/off, Gaming Preferred on/off, ensured 5ghz, etc etc etc.

 

End of the day, I can take the same gear off a uverse connection and it works just fine. plop all the gear back on uverse and the delay is experienced 'only' on controller input when wireless. Oddest thing ever. (And yes, speed tests are showing north of 500up/down, stadia tests show north of 500, and round trip latency to stadia server is 19ms.)

 

Curious if anyone else on FTTH gig service is experiencing these issues.

Tags (1)
Message 2 of 3
Administrator

Re: Google's Stadia – The Future of Gaming?


@RyudenPhoenix wrote:

Quick correction on one of your cons...

"You don’t own the games you’re playing. If you cancel subscription, your games are not available."

Aside from the fact that you don't own games even on Steam or Epic game store .... if you buy a game on stadia and cancel your subscription you still have access to the game. The only games you lose access to are those you 'claimed' that are free to pro subscribers. (Same as PS Plus or Xbox Live... you can play them as long as you sub.) Once you resubscribe or 'directly purchase' the game, you can play it again.


Great point! I appreciate the correction & additional information!

 


@RyudenPhoenix wrote:

But all that said, I'm on stadia, loving it. However, a couple of us (the proverbial internet 'us') that are on ATT Uverse (Gigapower... fiber... whatever you are calling FTTH now) are having lag issues when the controller is used wirelessly. Does not have delay when the PC is wired/wireless with keyboard/mouse or with stadia wired controller. Still chasing it down, but we've done everything from dmzplus/passhthrough, restarts, factory defaults, no other devices, WPA3 on/off, Gaming Preferred on/off, ensured 5ghz, etc etc etc.


I haven't heard about these issues - can you clarify some things for me?

 

  • Wireless controllers have input lag due to their nature. Typically it's around 5ms to 12ms of delay (which can be quite noticeable depending on the type of game, and your familiarity of gaming in general). Since it works flawlessly wired, I think it's just the natural wireless controller lag being the culprit versus your ISP, router, or modem. How bad is the delay? Do you have any way of testing it to get the time in milliseconds? Given that your connection to Stadia servers is 19ms, the wireless is adding almost another 50% delay.
  • The Stadia controller uses Bluetooth Low Energy 4.2 (BLE), and Dual-band (2.4GHz / 5GHz) IEEE 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac connectivity. BLE runs on a similar wave to the 2.4GHz (the most common one) so it's going to get a lot of interference. What does your network look like? Where are you, the computer/equipment, and the controller located in relation to your router? Are you in a house, apartment, or somewhere else? What's around your modem/router (Cordless phones, microwaves, Bluetooth speakers, wireless devices, etc.)
    • To add to this - when you take a service that's going to have delay (Google Server -> Your Modem/Router -> Your Equipment), adding a wireless controller is going to have delays. With a wireless, your gaming may look like this (Wireless Controller -> Equipment -> Modem/Router -> Google -> Modem/Router -> Equipment) depending on the configuration.

 


@RyudenPhoenix wrote:

End of the day, I can take the same gear off a uverse connection and it works just fine. plop all the gear back on uverse and the delay is experienced 'only' on controller input when wireless. Oddest thing ever. (And yes, speed tests are showing north of 500up/down, stadia tests show north of 500, and round trip latency to stadia server is 19ms.)

 

Curious if anyone else on FTTH gig service is experiencing these issues.


When you take it off a U-Verse connection, where are you connecting it to? What does that setup look like? The more details you can share, the better (I love a good networking issue).

 

Let me know! And thanks again for the correction on the owning versus subscribing!

*I am an AT&T employee, and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinions.
Message 3 of 3
Share this topic
Share this topic
Announcements
Thanksgifting! Get a $10 AT&T Visa® Reward Card* - Learn How
Additional Support