unwanted wireless tv traffic

Teacher

unwanted wireless tv traffic

Whenever I turn on a receiver (stb) the RG transmits the Uverse tv stream to the receiver twice: once over the HomePNA interface and simultaneously over the Wireless network.  The wireless tranmission is superfluous as I don't have any wireless receivers (they are all connected via house coax cable).  It uses up so much bandwidth that no devices can connect to the access point, so I need to suppress it.  I have upgraded the RG and tried to use MAC filtering to block the receivers from the wireless network, but neither has any effect.  Any ideas on how I might prevent the RG from sending the TV signal over the WLAN?

Message 1 of 38 (4,263 Views)
Professor

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Something is pulling wireless traffic. Turn off the Wireless radio on the RG and see what happens. Also, you can try by running a Ethernet line to a box, from the RG, and see what happens.
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"Ren: Now listen, Cadet. I've got a job for you. See this button? Don't touch it! It's the History Eraser button, you fool!

Stimpy: So what'll happen?

Ren: That's just it. We don't know. Maybe something bad, maybe something good. I guess we'll never know, 'cause you're going to guard it. You won't touch it, will you?"
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Message 16 of 38 (3,869 Views)
Teacher

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

After turning off wireless, all TV traffic went over HPNA only, generating about 11K packets per minute.  When I ran an Ethernet cable from the RG to the STB there were huge amounts of traffic on HPNA and on the Ethernet ports in use (one connected to the TV, the other to the laptop I was using to control the test), to the degree that I couldn't access the RG.  I figure that although a STB has connections for both coax and Ethernet, only one should be used at a time.  So, I disconnected the coax from the STB, removing it from the HPNA network.  Running the TV off Ethernet there was minimal traffic on HPNA (for the other STBs in the house that were off) and the laptop's Ethernet port, and about 11K packets per minute on the Ethernet port driving the STB that was on.  This would be proper behavior for STBs connected via Ethernet cable.  Then I turned Wireless back on.  Immediately I got equal amounts of traffic on both the Ethernet port connected to the STB and on Wireless, in this case around 10K packets per minute.  Conclusion:  any time Wireless is enabled the RG tries to double-send the TV signal over WiFi and whatever network the STB is connected to, no matter whether that is HPNA coax or Ethernet.  So, the problem isn't caused by old house coax cable, or the RG (since this is a brand new one that I got to try and fix the problem), or the firmware, since that is the same for everybody and I'm the only one getting this problem.  It is probably not a setting in the RG since it has just been reset to factory defaults.  So, maybe it is something about the STBs that is causing the RG to try and double-send the TV signal.  Maybe I need to upgrade those.

Message 17 of 38 (3,846 Views)
Professor

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Something is not right. I would have a tech come on site, and look things over. There is something missing here, because you should not be getting the packet flooding that you are getting.
________________________________________________________________

"Ren: Now listen, Cadet. I've got a job for you. See this button? Don't touch it! It's the History Eraser button, you fool!

Stimpy: So what'll happen?

Ren: That's just it. We don't know. Maybe something bad, maybe something good. I guess we'll never know, 'cause you're going to guard it. You won't touch it, will you?"
________________________________________________________________
Message 18 of 38 (3,834 Views)
Teacher

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Thanks to everyone's input I have a lot better understanding of the issue when I do get a tech on site.  It should interest them since apparently it has never been seen before.  Thanks again.

Message 19 of 38 (3,835 Views)
Former Community Manager

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Very interesting issue. 

 

Please keep us upated and let us know what the tech says!

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As of May 1st, I am no longer serving as the Community Manager for AT&T. This account will no longer be able to accept private messages.

Did a post have a solution that worked for you? Help other people find solutions faster by marking posts that helped you as an "Accepted Solution". Learn about accepted solutions here.

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Message 20 of 38 (3,767 Views)
Teacher
Solution
Accepted by jamileh (Former Community Manager)
‎09-30-2015 1:39 AM

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

This issue seems to be resolved.  The tech came out and replaced some parts (VDSL splitter mainly), tested the cabling, installed yet another RG, and generally brought everything up to current standards.  Everything was working fine when he left.  Later, as I went around connecting my various devices to the new RG, suddenly it started again - the Wireless light started blinking rapidly and devices could not connect.  It began to dawn on me that since nobody else in the world had experienced  this problem, it must be due to something that is unique to my environment, such as the specific devices I had connect to the wireless network.  One of the last devices I had connected was a Netgear WNCE3001.  This is basically an Ethernet-to-WiFi interface device.  It is most often used to WiFi-enable audio/video gear with an Ethernet port but no wireless capability built in.  My Marantz 6007 audio/video receiver supports the use of AirPlay and Spotify, which I wanted to try out on my network, which is wireless only.  The WNCE3001 was very easy to set up and worked beautifully.  Apparently though, when any set top box in the house is turned on (even in a different room from the Netgear device) it somehow causes the RG to repeat the Uverse TV stream over the WiFi network, using up all the bandwidth and making it impossible for other devices to maintain/establish connection.  Once I powered off the WNCE3001 the problem went away.  Now I see that many people have experienced similar problems with this product.  Unless somebody can figure out a way to configure this thing so it doesn't screw up the WiFi network I definitely recommend that Uverse customers avoid buying it.  If you want a service that is provided by an Ethernet-only device you are probably better off installing an Apple TV or Roku, which most likely can deliver any service you want.  Take away message:  avoid the WNCE3001 like the plague!

Message 21 of 38 (3,783 Views)
Former Community Manager

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Very interesting! Great detective work on your part!

--------------

As of May 1st, I am no longer serving as the Community Manager for AT&T. This account will no longer be able to accept private messages.

Did a post have a solution that worked for you? Help other people find solutions faster by marking posts that helped you as an "Accepted Solution". Learn about accepted solutions here.

I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.
Message 22 of 38 (3,778 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

I believe that this behavior falls under:

 

You can get a flood of Wireless traffic from your own routers when you connect them to the same "leg" from the RG as an STB and the exact symptoms you're talking about.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 23 of 38 (3,754 Views)
Teacher

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

The Marantz AVR was connected to both a STB and the WNCE3001 (the first via HDMI and the second via Ethernet cable) and as I understand it the WNCE3001 looks like a router to the Marantz, so you could say this is an instance of a router being connected on the same leg as a STB.  At least there was a path from the STB to the router-like thing thru the Marantz.  So maybe there is nothing wrong with the WNCE3001, I just violated a rule.  Since the other STBs in the house share an HPNA network I guess this would create a path from them to the WNCE3001 as well, so the flood occurred when any one of them was turned on.  So to WiFi-enable the Marantz I would need a different kind of interface device that doesn't do routing - some kind of dongle or something.  Live and learn.

Message 24 of 38 (3,747 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

[ Edited ]

embassy2934 - Why is the Marantz wi-fi not able to access the U-verse wi-fi? Or, is it that the Maantz is not wi-fi? Connect it cat5 to the RG. Or, is the nearby STB connected coax? Then connect the Marantz to the STB network jack vis cat5.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 25 of 38 (3,739 Views)
Teacher

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

The Marantz is not WiFi.  Most of the Internet services I use are available via the Blu-Ray player which is WiFi, so no great urgency to WiFi -enabling the Marantz.  That's an interesting suggestion about the STB (all my STBs are connected to the RG via coax).  I'll think about that one.  Thanks.

Message 26 of 38 (3,725 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

Can you claify what the WNCE3001 is connected to?

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 27 of 38 (3,697 Views)
Teacher

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

It was connected to the Ethernet port on the Marantz 6007 audio/video receiver.  One of the input sources to the Marantz is the Uverse STB.  The theory is that this created a path from the STB thru the Marantz to the WNCE3001, which emulates a router, thus constituting a router on the same leg (from the RG) as a STB, which apparently causes a flood of wireless traffic when the STB is on.  Statistics strongly suggest that the "flood" is actually the Uverse TV signal being repeated over WiFi.

Message 28 of 38 (3,683 Views)
ACE - Expert

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

So I'm picturing it like this:

 

RG <--Coax--> STB <-  Ethernet -> Mrantz 6007 <- Ethernet -> WNCE3001.

 

Is that right?

 

For the record, yes the STB does serve as a repeater (aka hub) between the HPNA/Coax interface and the Ethernet interface.

 

If the Mrantz is connected via Ethernet to the STB, then the WNCE3001 is superfluous anyway.

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 29 of 38 (3,681 Views)
Highlighted
ACE - Expert

Re: unwanted wireless tv traffic

I think there is some confusion here.

The Marantz has only one ethernet port. So, the connection from it to the STB is HDMI or component. These would not contain ethernet traffic.

The WNCE3001, is connected to the single Marantz network jack to make it wireless.

It says it is dual band. If you have wireless STBs, the WNCE3001 is picking up the TV signal from that network & laying it on the ethernet wireless.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Message 30 of 38 (3,671 Views)
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