Static IP address so I can set QOS

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Static IP address so I can set QOS

I would like to set a static IP address for my MicroCell so I can setup the QOS functionality on my router.  How can I do this?

 

 

--Chris Morris

Message 1 of 15 (7,544 Views)
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Accepted by topic author chrismorrisatl
‎09-30-2015 1:39 AM

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

The MicroCell is only capable of using DHCP.  If you can, try configuring your router to always assign a specific IP address to the MicroCell's MAC address. 

 


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Message 2 of 15 (7,529 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

I need to connect the MicroCell to a router whose DHCP server has been disabled.

 

Note that for my ATT Motorola Backflip, 7 different technical support people—both ATT and Motorola—assured me there was no way to set a static IP address. Finally, a Level 2 Motorola technical support supervisor showed me how to do it (actually, quite simple).

Hence, I am frustrated by the "cannot be done" responses.

It would seem very short-sighted for ATT (and Cisco) to market a device that cannot communicate with routers that do not provide DHCP service.

 

Help needed.

Message 3 of 15 (6,921 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

I'm sure it can be done but they are not going to show you how to do it. The fact that it is a Cisco device it's probably going to be running a form of IOS firmware which you need to be educated on how to make changes and they are not going to do that. The second suggestion is the best one to shoot for, if you are going to run it in between the router just have your router reserve the address to that MAC.

Message 4 of 15 (6,919 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

I must be missing something.

 

I understand how to use Mac address filtering to block connections (only devices whose Mac addresses have been registered will be permitted to connect). But I do not understand how to use Mac address filtering to assign an IP address and specify a subnet mask and dns servers when the router's dhcp is disabled.

 

Can a Linksys router be set to send an IP address and other information to only one device (specified by Mac address) and not to others?

 

Message 5 of 15 (6,877 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

Unfortantely you are correct, if you use the DHCP mac revesration then you can't specify DNS servers nor subnet mask. Basically what MAC reservation is in a nut shell is a DHCP/Static hybird, it allows you to take the DHCP address that you have in your range and statically assign MAC address so when those devices are connected or connecting they always get that specific DHCP address. Hope that helps you out

Message 6 of 15 (6,859 Views)
Contributor

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

Check to see if your router allows you to specify QOS based on the MAC address of the device.  I know Linksys routers allow that.  IMO, it seems like a pretty basic feature.

Message 7 of 15 (6,667 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

 


jspaloalto wrote:

 Finally, a Level 2 Motorola technical support supervisor showed me how to do it (actually, quite simple).


Care to share? 

 

Message 8 of 15 (6,603 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

Sure.

 

To set a static IP address on a Motorola Backflip:

Settings

Wireless controls

Wi-Fi [select/turn on]

Wi-Fi settings

menu button [lower left, with four squares; this is the step that I missed]

advanced

use static IP [select/turn on]

IP address [set the address XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX]

gateway [set the gateway XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX]

mask [set the subnet mask XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX.XXXX]

DNS1 and DNS2 [set the DNS server addresses XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX—this may not be needed, but my DSL connection requires that I do this]

 

joel

 

Message 9 of 15 (6,208 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

what router (make and model) do you have - Many are capable of Static IP leasing where when a device requests an IP address via DHCP, it receives one allocated and defined by you - based on its MAC address.

 

I use this on my network to insure my Microcell (and most other devices) always receive the same IP - outside the range of the DHCP pool.

 


chrismorrisatl wrote:

I would like to set a static IP address for my MicroCell so I can setup the QOS functionality on my router.  How can I do this?

 

 

--Chris Morris


 

Message 10 of 15 (6,205 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

Again, I must be missing something.

 

For the router that services my local network, DHCP is disabled. There is no DHCP. The router provides no addresses. The router provides no range of addresses. The router does not indicate the correct subnet mask. The router does not indicate accessible DNS servers.

 

Hence, any strategy that requires or involves DHCP cannot work.

 

At this point, even though ATT paid for it, I have returned the Micro-Cell. I will repurchase if anyone can explain how to set a static IP address and therefore connect it to my network.

 

Joel

 

Message 11 of 15 (5,057 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

 


jspaloalto wrote:

Again, I must be missing something.

 

For the router that services my local network, DHCP is disabled. There is no DHCP. The router provides no addresses. The router provides no range of addresses. The router does not indicate the correct subnet mask. The router does not indicate accessible DNS servers.

 

Hence, any strategy that requires or involves DHCP cannot work.

 

At this point, even though ATT paid for it, I have returned the Micro-Cell. I will repurchase if anyone can explain how to set a static IP address and therefore connect it to my network.

 

Joel

 


 

I've been managing networks large and small for many years now.  Connecting core routers to eachother obviously should never use DHCP, Connecting servers to uplink switches/routers generally should not use DHCP.  But for any office or home network I've managed, every time I tried doing static, I regretted it.  Eventually I only did it when customers demanded it, and further down the road, I decided it wasn't worth the hassle to even do it for customers who demanded it.

 

My home network (which has 13 devices on it), and my company's office network (with 50+ power user employees) runs DHCP with ~90% of devices assigned a static IP address by either Mac address or DHCP Identifier.  I couldn't imagine going back to running a shared network like this without DHCP.

 

For something like the Microcell, If for some reason it wasn't going onto a shared network, and was being assigned it's own router port at one of my datacenters, I'd still have no problem just assigning a static IP to it using DHCP.

 

What's your beef with DHCP?

Message 12 of 15 (5,050 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

My disinclination to use DHCP?

 

Well, it began with an Epson network printer that insisted on a static IP address (long ago).

 

But I retain the static IP approach mostly for security. Using oddball static IP addresses and an unusual subnet mask makes it much more difficult for anyone to guess an entry point to our humble network, even if they can identify the wireless signal and crack the password. (MAC address filtering adds another layer.)

 

Also, over many years I have found Microsoft's routines through which peer-to-peer networks communicate (including deciding which computer will hold the master record of all the other network members) to be very quirky. Sometimes one computer is unable to see another, for no apparent reason. While I am figuring out the reason, the static addresses permit peer-to-peer command line communication. I can copy and delete files, access directories, and do other essential tasks even when MyComputer or MyNetworkNeighborhood on one computer cannot seem to find another. Even when the router is down (and thus no addresses from the router) and the wired computers are connected to a hub, the static IP addresses enable me to maintain the connections among them.

 

Also also, when one of the networked computers fails to reconnect mapped drives (all drives, both on computers and directly attached to the network, are mapped on all computers, permitting drive-letter access across the system) at startup (currently a problem with one XP Pro computer), I do not need to go hunting for it to reconnect, or to ask it about its current IP address. I can simply enter its permanent IP address to restore the mapping.

 

For my small home network (now 13 devices, including two telephones and a television), assigning and managing IP addresses remains quite manageable.

 

So, sure, I could give all that up and enable DHCP. Perhaps someday I will. But for the present I see no reason to do so, and certainly not to humor ATT's MicroCell.

 

Joel

 

Message 13 of 15 (5,037 Views)

Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

If your router allows it, you could setup DHCP to hand-out 1 lease at the upper range of your subnet - ie 192.168.50.254
Message 14 of 15 (5,009 Views)
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Re: Static IP address so I can set QOS

 


jspaloalto wrote:

My disinclination to use DHCP?

 

Well, it began with an Epson network printer that insisted on a static IP address (long ago).

 

But I retain the static IP approach mostly for security. Using oddball static IP addresses and an unusual subnet mask makes it much more difficult for anyone to guess an entry point to our humble network, even if they can identify the wireless signal and crack the password. (MAC address filtering adds another layer.)

 

Also, over many years I have found Microsoft's routines through which peer-to-peer networks communicate (including deciding which computer will hold the master record of all the other network members) to be very quirky. Sometimes one computer is unable to see another, for no apparent reason. While I am figuring out the reason, the static addresses permit peer-to-peer command line communication. I can copy and delete files, access directories, and do other essential tasks even when MyComputer or MyNetworkNeighborhood on one computer cannot seem to find another. Even when the router is down (and thus no addresses from the router) and the wired computers are connected to a hub, the static IP addresses enable me to maintain the connections among them.

 

Also also, when one of the networked computers fails to reconnect mapped drives (all drives, both on computers and directly attached to the network, are mapped on all computers, permitting drive-letter access across the system) at startup (currently a problem with one XP Pro computer), I do not need to go hunting for it to reconnect, or to ask it about its current IP address. I can simply enter its permanent IP address to restore the mapping.

 

For my small home network (now 13 devices, including two telephones and a television), assigning and managing IP addresses remains quite manageable.

 

So, sure, I could give all that up and enable DHCP. Perhaps someday I will. But for the present I see no reason to do so, and certainly not to humor ATT's MicroCell.

 

Joel

 


 

If someone guessed your Wifi password, they could run tcpdump and see what ip addresses are in use. You can set a DHCP server to only assign addresses to known mac addresses. You can set your WiFi AP to only allow known mac addresses to associate. Windows behavior I can't comment on. I mean, I see that it's not worth it to change things for the Microcell -- but give DHCP a chance Smiley Happy

 

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