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Posted Sep 16, 2009
8:48:03 AM
DSL Modem
The ATT logo Motorola High Speed DSL modem, model # 2210-02, its quality getting worst I think. maybe its design or low quality components which its made in China. The last one got it from ATT with the same model, when my SBC modem went bad after three years of used, took a week to get it replace from ATT. It last for about 14 months and went dead, checked inside found bad components and can not find same type of component replace immediately, , called ATT and stuck on waiting sales department. Since I need the PC to work immediately because some work need to done quick, so went to Fry's got a same model modem, work about a month with no problem although the modem is very hot to touch most of the time, same problem as the last modem, this one, after one month of use, I have to unplug the modem power cord each day to have the modem cool down before replug it back, because when it too hot, the ethernet and internet light went off, so can not get connection. ATT really need to have the quality control the products.
The ATT logo Motorola High Speed DSL modem, model # 2210-02, its quality getting worst I think. maybe its design or low quality components which its made in China. The last one got it from ATT with the same model, when my SBC modem went bad after three years of used, took a week to get it replace from ATT. It last for about 14 months and went dead, checked inside found bad components and can not find same type of component replace immediately, , called ATT and stuck on waiting sales department. Since I need the PC to work immediately because some work need to done quick, so went to Fry's got a same model modem, work about a month with no problem although the modem is very hot to touch most of the time, same problem as the last modem, this one, after one month of use, I have to unplug the modem power cord each day to have the modem cool down before replug it back, because when it too hot, the ethernet and internet light went off, so can not get connection. ATT really need to have the quality control the products.

DSL Modem

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Sep 17, 2009 12:52:31 PM
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I have a 2210-02 model I got from wal-mart here in the midwest, so far for the 3 months I have had it it's held up rather well. If all the modems are constantly overheating no matter which one you plug in (assuming this might be what killed the old one as well) I would be sure you are not sending a higher voltage or frequency via electric to the modem (dirty power as it's called sometimes). Dirty power can damage, not just modems, cell phones, tv's, computers (although the supplies can handle some things a bit better, they are not completely immune). I have also seen bad power strips cause these types of problems as well.
I have a 2210-02 model I got from wal-mart here in the midwest, so far for the 3 months I have had it it's held up rather well. If all the modems are constantly overheating no matter which one you plug in (assuming this might be what killed the old one as well) I would be sure you are not sending a higher voltage or frequency via electric to the modem (dirty power as it's called sometimes). Dirty power can damage, not just modems, cell phones, tv's, computers (although the supplies can handle some things a bit better, they are not completely immune). I have also seen bad power strips cause these types of problems as well.
*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 17, 2009 5:39:54 PM
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Since the adapter only sending less then 0.50 A power to the modem, it could not be make the modem that hot, the only problem is cheap components in the modem that would not last. I had see same company components in China made electronic device gone bad so quick, most just passed the warranty and the device does need service at no time. Also, the modem has not much space for heat to release from the device.
Since the adapter only sending less then 0.50 A power to the modem, it could not be make the modem that hot, the only problem is cheap components in the modem that would not last. I had see same company components in China made electronic device gone bad so quick, most just passed the warranty and the device does need service at no time. Also, the modem has not much space for heat to release from the device.

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 17, 2009 7:31:13 PM
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Well the other option is you can use any other modem you wish. As long as the VP/VC can change to 0/35 and can sync with AT&T's DSLAM, the sky is the limit on what you want to use. However, don't expect phone support to be able to assist you with it if it's something that's not supported.
The ones that support can typically help you with


Efficient: 5260, 5360, 5100a, 5100b, 4100, 4100b
Motorola: 2210, 2210-02
Westell: 6100, F90
2wire: 1000, 1000sw, 1700, 1800, 2700, 2701
netopia: 3346, 3347, 3220-H (cayman)
Well the other option is you can use any other modem you wish. As long as the VP/VC can change to 0/35 and can sync with AT&T's DSLAM, the sky is the limit on what you want to use. However, don't expect phone support to be able to assist you with it if it's something that's not supported.
The ones that support can typically help you with


Efficient: 5260, 5360, 5100a, 5100b, 4100, 4100b
Motorola: 2210, 2210-02
Westell: 6100, F90
2wire: 1000, 1000sw, 1700, 1800, 2700, 2701
netopia: 3346, 3347, 3220-H (cayman)
*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 21, 2009 9:57:54 AM
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solutions_ten wrote:
the modem is very hot to touch most of the time, same problem as the last modem, this one, after one month of use, I have to unplug the modem power cord each day to have the modem cool down before replug it back, because when it too hot, the ethernet and internet light went off, so can not get connection.
I think there had been a product quality mishap with the recent modems... I found it in a website, and says there that a batch of Motorola modem had been bad... You may want to check with Technical Support over the phone if your Motorola modem is part of the defective batch and get a free replacement...

solutions_ten wrote:
the modem is very hot to touch most of the time, same problem as the last modem, this one, after one month of use, I have to unplug the modem power cord each day to have the modem cool down before replug it back, because when it too hot, the ethernet and internet light went off, so can not get connection.
I think there had been a product quality mishap with the recent modems... I found it in a website, and says there that a batch of Motorola modem had been bad... You may want to check with Technical Support over the phone if your Motorola modem is part of the defective batch and get a free replacement...

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 21, 2009 4:17:48 PM
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heard the same rumor about that moto2210's defective batch! LOL :smileyhappy:

hopefully your moto2210 is under the 1-year warranty to get that replaced. :smileyhappy:
heard the same rumor about that moto2210's defective batch! LOL :smileyhappy:

hopefully your moto2210 is under the 1-year warranty to get that replaced. :smileyhappy:

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 23, 2009 3:29:06 PM
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Yes, its under one year, I bought it at July 30, 2009, the old same model was 14 months earlier.
Yes, its under one year, I bought it at July 30, 2009, the old same model was 14 months earlier.

Re: DSL Modem

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Sep 30, 2009 1:26:23 PM
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I have been having the same problem with my modem that the other users have noted. It heats up after just a short time and then the DSL and ethernet lights go out. I have to unplug the modem several times as well to let it "cool" down and that does not always work. Usually takes sometime to get it working again. I called tech support and they were absolutely of no help, on top of barely being able to understand them, and told me that my modem was no longer under warranty. They told me it could be my phone line. I told them if it was my phone line I would not be able to use the phone and obviously I was calling from my home number. They told me there was nothing further they could do for me and suggested I go to an office supply store and buy a new modem. I think they should replace it at no cost to me as I don't believe that I should be having problems with it after having it only a year and a half. Obviously, they need to stop purchasing junk equipment from China.
I have been having the same problem with my modem that the other users have noted. It heats up after just a short time and then the DSL and ethernet lights go out. I have to unplug the modem several times as well to let it "cool" down and that does not always work. Usually takes sometime to get it working again. I called tech support and they were absolutely of no help, on top of barely being able to understand them, and told me that my modem was no longer under warranty. They told me it could be my phone line. I told them if it was my phone line I would not be able to use the phone and obviously I was calling from my home number. They told me there was nothing further they could do for me and suggested I go to an office supply store and buy a new modem. I think they should replace it at no cost to me as I don't believe that I should be having problems with it after having it only a year and a half. Obviously, they need to stop purchasing junk equipment from China.

Re: DSL Modem

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Apr 21, 2010 7:17:51 AM
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When I signed up for AT&T "high" speed internet service (DSL), I already had a wireless access point and a router (a *nix box) I was quite happy with, and which had worked well for me in a Comcast environment - so I ordered the simple "DSL modem".

 

Imagine my surprise when the Piece of [word filter violation] thing wanted to be a NAT router, and refused to sustain a DSL connection.  After a lot of poking around on forums like this, I discovered that a solution to my problem was to put the DSL modem into bridging mode (so I could run PPPoe on my *nix box), AND physically locate the modem on it's side in order to improve heat dissipation (I think turning off most of the modems routing functions also helped reduce the amount of power it consumed for unnecessary processing.)

 

Frankly, I *want* the *nix box in there - so I can do the kind of IP address and network filtering I want to do, and the kind of DNS blocking I want to do.  I don't trust the consumer grade equipment to do what I want.  Too often the consumer grade stuff has all kinds of "helpful" features that make securing the network to my satisfaction impossible.

 

This worked from January through yesterday evening.

 

Now, I can't sustain a PPPoE session.  If I power off the modem for a show while, things work for a little while - but not long.  I haven't completely documented this, but I think this Piece of [word filter violation] modem from Motorola is at fault.  I've got to start looking for a replacement modem - or abandon AT&T for Comcast.

 

When I signed up for AT&T "high" speed internet service (DSL), I already had a wireless access point and a router (a *nix box) I was quite happy with, and which had worked well for me in a Comcast environment - so I ordered the simple "DSL modem".

 

Imagine my surprise when the Piece of [word filter violation] thing wanted to be a NAT router, and refused to sustain a DSL connection.  After a lot of poking around on forums like this, I discovered that a solution to my problem was to put the DSL modem into bridging mode (so I could run PPPoe on my *nix box), AND physically locate the modem on it's side in order to improve heat dissipation (I think turning off most of the modems routing functions also helped reduce the amount of power it consumed for unnecessary processing.)

 

Frankly, I *want* the *nix box in there - so I can do the kind of IP address and network filtering I want to do, and the kind of DNS blocking I want to do.  I don't trust the consumer grade equipment to do what I want.  Too often the consumer grade stuff has all kinds of "helpful" features that make securing the network to my satisfaction impossible.

 

This worked from January through yesterday evening.

 

Now, I can't sustain a PPPoE session.  If I power off the modem for a show while, things work for a little while - but not long.  I haven't completely documented this, but I think this Piece of [word filter violation] modem from Motorola is at fault.  I've got to start looking for a replacement modem - or abandon AT&T for Comcast.

 

Re: DSL Modem

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Apr 22, 2010 2:34:36 AM
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Hello userw014,
  
You need to be configured properly into Bridged Ethernet Mode when connecting a 3rd party (Nix Box) router to your AT&T modem. Configuring your modem in this way is also useful when connecting computers or other devices.

 


It is recommended that you use an AT&T provided networking modem when attempting to network multiple PCs. Our DSL Helpdesk can provide support for AT&T supported routers 24/7. Please call us if you are interested in AT&T Home Networking.

Note: As 3rd party routers are not supported by AT&T, the following steps are provided to help you in connecting the router to your modem. Additional router configuration support can be provided by contacting your router's manufacturer.

AT&T provided modems are originally set up to connect you to the Internet as soon as you enter your Username and Password. These are the most common of home networking configurations. You may have a 1 port modem but may have purchased a home networking router with multiple ports. For the modem to work properly with most routers, it will need to be put into "Bridged Ethernet Mode" first.

While a bridged mode will allow you to connect your 3rd party router, it will disable your ability to surf the Internet if the modem is connected directly to the PC. After the router is hooked up, it will need to be configured with your Username and Password in order for you to connect to the Internet.
  • A network bridge is a device that connects two dissimilar networks, called bridging. Traffic from one network is forwarded through it to another network. No routing is involved whatsoever. The bridge simply does what its name entails, by connecting two sides of a network.



Note: Prior to resetting any modem or router, all configuration settings will be lost and will need to be re-entered. If you are using a 3rd party modem or router, you may need to contact the manufacturer for advanced configuration support. If you are a business, contact your IT department to let them know that they are resetting their modem or router and obtain assistance in reconfiguring it if special configurations had been made previously.

 

Motorola 2210 2.0:

To bridge the Motorola 2210 2.0 modem, verify that the modem is directly connected to the computer. Ensure the router is not connected to the PC or the modem, then follow the steps mentioned below:

 

 

  1. Open a web browser.
  2. Type 192.168.1.254 in the address bar.
  3. Click the Go button or press the enter key on the keyboard.
  4. Click the Advanced link.

    There may be a prompt for a Modem Access Code. If so, do the following:

  5. Locate the yellow sticker on the bottom of the Motorola 2210 2.0 modem.

  6. Type the code in the Modem Access Code field.
  7. Click the Continue button.

  8. Click on the PPP Location link.
  9. Choose PPP is on the computer, gateway or router radio button.
  10. Click the Save Changes button.

 

If you experience any difficulty while configuring your Motorola modem for the PPPoE connection, it is recommended that you contact AT&T eChat support.

 

If you are in, 'AR, CA, CT, IL, IN, KS, MI, MO, NV, OH, OK, TX, & WI ', you may click on the following link to connect to a chat agent.

https://pattta.att.motive.com/netagent/questionnaire_c2c_dsl_sw.aspx

 

Remember to always mark items that you find useful as "Accepted Solutions”, you can even mark multiple
posts
in a single thread.  This will help other users find this information too!!

Hello userw014,
  
You need to be configured properly into Bridged Ethernet Mode when connecting a 3rd party (Nix Box) router to your AT&T modem. Configuring your modem in this way is also useful when connecting computers or other devices.

 


It is recommended that you use an AT&T provided networking modem when attempting to network multiple PCs. Our DSL Helpdesk can provide support for AT&T supported routers 24/7. Please call us if you are interested in AT&T Home Networking.

Note: As 3rd party routers are not supported by AT&T, the following steps are provided to help you in connecting the router to your modem. Additional router configuration support can be provided by contacting your router's manufacturer.

AT&T provided modems are originally set up to connect you to the Internet as soon as you enter your Username and Password. These are the most common of home networking configurations. You may have a 1 port modem but may have purchased a home networking router with multiple ports. For the modem to work properly with most routers, it will need to be put into "Bridged Ethernet Mode" first.

While a bridged mode will allow you to connect your 3rd party router, it will disable your ability to surf the Internet if the modem is connected directly to the PC. After the router is hooked up, it will need to be configured with your Username and Password in order for you to connect to the Internet.
  • A network bridge is a device that connects two dissimilar networks, called bridging. Traffic from one network is forwarded through it to another network. No routing is involved whatsoever. The bridge simply does what its name entails, by connecting two sides of a network.



Note: Prior to resetting any modem or router, all configuration settings will be lost and will need to be re-entered. If you are using a 3rd party modem or router, you may need to contact the manufacturer for advanced configuration support. If you are a business, contact your IT department to let them know that they are resetting their modem or router and obtain assistance in reconfiguring it if special configurations had been made previously.

 

Motorola 2210 2.0:

To bridge the Motorola 2210 2.0 modem, verify that the modem is directly connected to the computer. Ensure the router is not connected to the PC or the modem, then follow the steps mentioned below:

 

 

  1. Open a web browser.
  2. Type 192.168.1.254 in the address bar.
  3. Click the Go button or press the enter key on the keyboard.
  4. Click the Advanced link.

    There may be a prompt for a Modem Access Code. If so, do the following:

  5. Locate the yellow sticker on the bottom of the Motorola 2210 2.0 modem.

  6. Type the code in the Modem Access Code field.
  7. Click the Continue button.

  8. Click on the PPP Location link.
  9. Choose PPP is on the computer, gateway or router radio button.
  10. Click the Save Changes button.

 

If you experience any difficulty while configuring your Motorola modem for the PPPoE connection, it is recommended that you contact AT&T eChat support.

 

If you are in, 'AR, CA, CT, IL, IN, KS, MI, MO, NV, OH, OK, TX, & WI ', you may click on the following link to connect to a chat agent.

https://pattta.att.motive.com/netagent/questionnaire_c2c_dsl_sw.aspx

 

*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: DSL Modem

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Apr 22, 2010 12:57:59 PM
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I agree with penny, I bridged my 2210 a long time ago and turned it into a bridged DSL modem. I let the router handle the functions. 

 

 

I agree with penny, I bridged my 2210 a long time ago and turned it into a bridged DSL modem. I let the router handle the functions. 

 

 

*I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent AT&T’s position, strategies or opinions.

Re: DSL Modem

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