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Contributor

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2 Messages

Mon, Jun 11, 2018 8:14 PM

Cancel mobile account for deceased person

As executor for a deceased relative, I tried to notify AT&T that his account should be canceled. The phone itself actually disappeared at the hospital when he died. They keep sending bills every month, and told me that I need his PIN to cancel the account. Since the only person who knew the PIN is dead, that seems like an impossible task! Any thoughts on this, other than just disallowing the claim in the estate and moving on with life? Thanks.

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Fl_retire

ACE - Professor

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1.4K Messages

2 years ago

@AMitch829  Sorry for your loss. 

 

Link below os some information on a life event from ATT. Hope this helps. 

 

https://www.att.com/esupport/article.html#!/wireless/KM1113355

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*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Moderator

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497 Messages

2 years ago

A loss in the family is something we know can be a difficult time in our lives. It can be even more stressful when we are attempting to close out or cancel their account.

 

We would like to help make this a bit easier to for you. For the latest information on how to close out or cancel their account, please refer to Death In The Family – How to Cancel An Account.

 

- The AT&T Community Team

sandblaster

ACE - Expert

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33.9K Messages

2 years ago

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Contributor

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2 Messages

2 years ago

I have read that - however, that is not how the phone conversation went. FYI, a 'power of attorney' does not have any power when a person is deceased. An executor steps into the role that an attorney-in-fact might have had during the person's life. A death certificate was sent, and this meant nothing to AT&T. You obviously need a better system for decedent's accounts.