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Videoeic's profile

Contributor

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3 Messages

Tue, Jan 29, 2019 11:34 PM

AT&T is allowing their own telemarketers to call you even if you are on the Do not call registry

I have been on the Do not call registry since 2006, Since then I have called ATT at least 5 times to complain about spam and telemarketers. I have downloaded the "call protect" app that they suggested. NOTHING makes a difference. I just got off the phone with customer service (located in the Philippines and hard to understand the agent). This time they asked me if I want to be put on their list of people not to call from their own internal AT&T Telemarketers. why doesn't AT&T have to abide by the national DO Not Call List ??? I get at least 2 calls a day that says "AT&T Telemarketer". This is getting out of hand. I can't believe in this day and age you guys can't get your act together. I've been a customer for 20 yrs, family has been a master dealer and I'm in the telecommunication biz. It's sad to see this, but I think I'll have to goto Verizon.

Jenkna

Scholar

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97 Messages

3 y ago

They are breaking the law if they are still calling you after you informed them you didn’t want them calling anymore.   

 

According to donotcall.gov:

“A consumer who receives a telemarketing call despite being on the registry can file a complaint with the FTC, either online or by calling a toll-free number. Violators could be fined up to $16,000 per incident.”

 

Submit a complaint to the FTC:

https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/#crnt

 

Here is some more relevant information:

https://www.donotcall.gov/faq/faqbusiness.aspx#who

 

What About An Established Business Relationship?

 

A telemarketer or seller may call a consumer with whom it has an established business relationship for up to 18 months after the consumer's last purchase, delivery, or payment - even if the consumer's number is on the National Do Not Call Registry. In addition, a company may call a consumer for up to three months after the consumer makes an inquiry or submits an application to the company. And if a consumer has given a company written permission, the company may call even if the consumer's number is on the National Do Not Call Registry.

***********************

One caveat: if a consumer asks a company not to call, the company may not call, even if there is an established business relationship. Indeed, a company may not call a consumer - regardless of whether the consumer's number is on the registry - if the consumer has asked to be put on the company's own do not call list.

*************************

 

For more information, please see FTC INFORMATION AND DOCUMENTS below.

 

Good luck!

ACE - Sage

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92.1K Messages

3 y ago

1.   Att specifically says they will not call you.  Unless you initiate a request and give permission, they do not call you,  If you get a call purporting to be At&t, it’s not.  

2.   As an existing At&t customer, they are exempt from the TCPA (telephone consumer protection act) 

https://transition.fcc.gov/cgb/policy/TCPA-Rules.pdf

3.  Spoofers will use the caller ID for a legitimate caller or business.  Have you ever answered these At&t calls?

 

ACE - Sage

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92.1K Messages

3 y ago

@Jenkna nice post speedy!

Jenkna

Scholar

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97 Messages

3 y ago

@lizdance40 

There is an exception to the “established business relationship” rule and the OP has clearly communicated his desire to no longer receive calls.   If AT&T is still making sales calls to the OP, they are breaking the law and can be fined: 2885ED69-53C6-4420-933F-87548A33015B.jpeg

 

Contributor

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3 Messages

3 y ago

The caller ID comes up as "ATT Telemarketer", Yes I know that can be spoofed. Tonight I answered and it was not ATT, it was A student loan consolidation service but said ATT Telemarketer. 

1st problem is that ATT should be able to see that that the caller ID is not from their own in house Telemarketers.

2nd problem is that this is 2019 and this problem has been around for 20 years and they can't figure out a way to stop spoofing????

They should be embarresed 

ACE - Sage

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92.1K Messages

3 y ago


@Videoeic wrote:

The caller ID comes up as "ATT Telemarketer", Yes I know that can be spoofed. Tonight I answered and it was not ATT, it was A student loan consolidation service but said ATT Telemarketer. 

1st problem is that ATT should be able to see that that the caller ID is not from their own in house Telemarketers.

2nd problem is that this is 2019 and this problem has been around for 20 years and they can't figure out a way to stop spoofing????

They should be embarresed 


All customers from all carriers are having this problem, not just At&t.  

 

Spoofed calls are a well know problem.  If it were easily fixed it would have been done a year ago.  

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/53cc6e65e4b0fa81a698730a/t/58e3066e893fc013074c000d/1491273326617/Spoofing+and+Authentication.pdf

What is being done:    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/fcc-robocall-strike-force-kicks-210003971.html;_ylt=AwrC1CkaH7tXInIAXP2amolQ;_ylu=X3oDMTBydDI5cXVuBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM2BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg--

Why it’s so difficult:    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/10/robocallers-evolved-to-sidestep-new-call-blocking-rules-ags-tell-fcc/

 

 

Ulak34

Associated Member

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158 Messages

3 y ago

@Videoeic 

 

Just interested to know what you meant by:

"1st problem is that ATT should be able to see that that the caller ID is not from their own in house Telemarketers."

How would that help in this situation? Aside from assuring you that it is not an AT&T Telemarketer, (which would have been on you to believe or not) how does this change anything?

As @lizdance40 shared links to, Spoofing has been around forever, and it is EXTREMELY difficult to fight. Look up other Carrier forums and you will find problems with every single carrier. 

Contributor

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3 Messages

3 y ago

I'm aware how and why spoofing takes place, the problem I have is that... If you are aware there has been a problem since the being of caller ID, why is it 30-40 years later we still have that problem? With all the technological advances and mostly every call be digital why cant there be any form of authentication?. Also where is the record of who gets fined for calling a Do not call number? And who pockets the $10,000 fine? If the recipient of that call got 5k and the phone company got 5k more people would report the call. Also how come there isn't a button on your keypad screen that lets you report a spoofed number?  It does'nt seem like anything is getting done about this. Besides the annoyance factor, lots of people are getting scammed. ATT is charging $3.99/ month to add Call protection plus to your account which blocks calls that they KNOW are bogus!!! At Verizon it's FREE. So My point is if they know the call is bogus, why are they allowing the call to be sent to my phone? Again, It's not a priority to them.

ACE - Sage

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92.1K Messages

3 y ago

Well now I know you didn’t read the links I posted.  

Until October 2017 is was not legal for any carrier to block a call. It was entirely up to the customer to block or sign up for do not call lists.  We know that did not prevent scammers from breaking the laws, it never does.  

 As soon as carriers could do something, they created the ‘strike force’ ( See the 2nd link I posted)  to try and create a system to identify and block calls that are not using their own caller ID.  And the 3rd link tells you why it isn’t that easy.  

At&t has the Call Protect app for wireless, which worked well for a while, but is not as effective anymore (See the 3rd link again). 

Now, so as not to waste any more of your time coming back to the forum, bookmark the links in post 7 and read at your leisure, as they are somewhat lengthy.  

 

 

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