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R

New Member

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3 Messages

Thu, Jul 2, 2020 5:02 PM

EAS tests and messages

Why is it that when the local U-Verse hub broadcasts either an EAS test or emergency warning, such as a flash flood warning, the audio level of the entire test and message is at least +20 Dba above the average program level? It just happened this morning at 11:45am, July 2. The message transmitted was a Required Weekly Test. As a retired broadcast engineer I understand the need to transmit these tests and warnings, but please get youe audio levels under control! When ANY of the DFW local stations transmit similar tests their audio levels during the test are consistent with their average program level. Yes, it is only when U-Verse itself broadcasts these tests and messages. Yes, I do have a calibrated audio meter that shows me how much louder your tests are than the locals. Please fix this. One day you will blow out someone's speakers or amplifier and you really will know what an angry customer sounds like.

Responses

skeeterintexas

ACE - Expert

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15K Messages

a month ago

I just assumed it was loud to draw attention to the warning.  Like if you were in the next room, it should be louder than regular programming so you're sure to hear it.

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New Member

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3 Messages

EAS messaging is not intended to be "louder" than the average program level. The messaging "squawks" are digital signals intended to be decoded by other broadcast stations and sometimes forwarded again. Amber alerts have their distinctive siren-like sound, and so on. But +20Dba? FAR too high a level. 

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