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Jetmugg

Teacher

 • 

13 Messages

Wed, Jul 11, 2012 2:56 PM

Recent U-Verse Customer - would like to add a wired receiver in basement (Cable already run).

Hello:

 

    I'm a new U-verse customer (about a month).  I am also finishing my basement  into a family area with big screen TV, surround sound, etc.  I have wired the basement with Co-axial cable and Cat5 cable.  I just ordered the TV and surround sound for the basement, but it hasn't arrived yet.  I have Co-axial cable outlets available at every location I could possibly want to put the TV in the basement.  Mobility of the TV will not be an issue.

 

   The basement remodel project is actually going quicker than expected, and I would like to add a U-Verse reciever in the basement.  When the installation tech did the work on my initial installation, I told him that I would eventually want to add another receiver in th basement, and asked for his recommendations.

 

   He told me that I could probably do a wireless receiver in the basement, although it's a pretty long way from the RG, which is on the 2nd floor of the house.  He said that if it was his home, he would try to do a wired installation.  I tend to agree.

 

    I know that I could add a wireless receiver, and probably get a decent signal, but I just "feel" better with hard-wired connections.  Additionally, I can't find out if there is a monthly charge for an additional wired reciever, as there is with a wireless receiver.

 

    I logged into my ATT account, but there were no options to add a wired receiver, only for adding wireless receivers.  Is there another way to add a wired receiver to my home?

 

    Is it possible to add a wired receiver, and is there a monthly charge to have an additional wired receiver?  Even if there is a mandatory service visit (which I have read there might be), this could still be the best option.

 

Any advice would be appreciated.

 

Steve M.

Responses

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago

If you want to use the wireless receiver as a wired receiver, you don not need to plug the WAP for the wireless receiver into the RG.  Once the Cat5 cable is connected between the RG and the wireless receiver and the receiver is turned on, the receiver should boot up if it has been activated on your account.

fearlessuser

Scholar

 • 

109 Messages

8 years ago

I think the way AT&T wants to do it is a wireless STB can be done as a self install where they mail it out to you and you connect it. For a wired box, you'd have to call and have a tech come out, regardless of if you have a jack at the location or not, probably to test and make sure the signal gets there right. Even if it actually does get there right, they dont have it built into their system to send you a new wired box, only a replacement. At least that's the story i got for the box I wanted to add in the same room as my RG that I could just run a cat5 cable directly to.

 

Depending on what promos you might have, the initial box is included in the price of the service, any additional box is $7 a month, wired or wireless

Jetmugg

Teacher

 • 

13 Messages

8 years ago

OK, thanks for the response.  If there is a $7 per additional receiver charge, (either wireless or wired), then there isn't as much benefit to using a wired receiver as I thought there might be. 

 

I still like the idea of a hard-wired connection, but it's possible that I'm over-thinking this.

 

The wireless receivers also have a port on the back for CAT5 input, but no Co-ax input on the back of the receiver, right?  I don't have a receiver in front of me right now.

 

Steve.

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago


@Jetmugg wrote:

 

The wireless receivers also have a port on the back for CAT5 input, but no Co-ax input on the back of the receiver, right?  I don't have a receiver in front of me right now.

 

Steve.


Correct.  You can use the wireless receiver as a wired receiver by connected it to the U-verse gateway using a Cat5 cable and removing the WAP.

Anonymous

New Member

 • 

25.7K Messages

8 years ago

I believe the wireless receivers have a one time $45 dollar fee atttached to them for the extra WAP needed to connect it.  If you do a standard box then you would save the $45 since you are going to go hardwire anyway.  Just sayin.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

 • 

17.6K Messages

8 years ago

Well, it might come down to the lesser of two evils:

 

Wireless Box + WAP: $45.00.  Throw WAP in closet and run your own cable.

Wired Box + Truck Roll: $55.00 + whatever tech adds on for wiring.

 

 

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*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Anonymous

New Member

 • 

25.7K Messages

8 years ago

Wonder why someone can't call and order an additional standard box then just call and have it provisioned once connected?  Isn't that what they are doing when DVR's go bad?  Send a new one and then customer calls to have it provisioned to their account?

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago


@BeeBeeSA wrote:

 

I believe the wireless receivers have a one time $45 dollar fee atttached to them for the extra WAP needed to connect it.  If you do a standard box then you would save the $45 since you are going to go hardwire anyway.  Just sayin.


It's actually a $49 onetime fee for the wireless receivers.

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago


@BeeBeeSA wrote:

 

Wonder why someone can't call and order an additional standard box then just call and have it provisioned once connected?  Isn't that what they are doing when DVR's go bad?  Send a new one and then customer calls to have it provisioned to their account?


Swapping the DVR is the replacement of an existing box not installing a new box.  Adding a wired STB is installing a new box not the replacement of an existing box.  Only adding a new wireless receiver is a self install.

 

If I had a choice, I could chose to use the wireless receiver as a wired box instead of getting a wired STB because the wireless receiver has more memory and a faster processor.  You will notice the difference.

Escapee

Employee

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3.9K Messages

8 years ago

The other nice thing about the wireless is you can move it as things change in your household.

*I am an AT&T employee, and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinions.
Jetmugg

Teacher

 • 

13 Messages

8 years ago

OK - I think I have been convinced to buy an additional wireless receiver for the basement.  I still think that I may run it as a wired box, since I have been pulling Cat6 and Coax all around the remodeled basement. 

 

I still don't understand why a wireless box can be installed by the homeowner, but the wired box requires a technician/service call when the coax/Cat6 infratructure is already present.  I'm not talking about not understanding the ATT policy, I'm talking about the technical side of the installation. 

 

Are there technical reasons why a homeowner could not expect to be able to hook up a coax cable to the back of the wired STB and to the RG at the other end, and enter whatever codes are needed?

 

How much different can a wired installation be to  to configuring an additional wireless box? 

fearlessuser

Scholar

 • 

109 Messages

8 years ago


@Jetmugg wrote:

Are there technical reasons why a homeowner could not expect to be able to hook up a coax cable to the back of the wired STB and to the RG at the other end, and enter whatever codes are needed?

 

How much different can a wired installation be to  to configuring an additional wireless box? 



Same questions I had. Their only answer was "we dont have a way to send someone a wired box without a tech, its not an option in our system"

Jetmugg

Teacher

 • 

13 Messages

8 years ago

Before I plunk down my money, I would like to get verification of one last item....

 

If I were to get a wired receiver, and pay for the technician visit, is there still a monthly charge for an additional wired box, and is the monthly charge the same as if it were a wireless box?

 

I think the answer is "yes", but would appreciate confirmation.

 

SteveM.

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago


@Jetmugg wrote:

 

If I were to get a wired receiver, and pay for the technician visit, is there still a monthly charge for an additional wired box, and is the monthly charge the same as if it were a wireless box?


Yes and yes.

texasguy37

Expert

 • 

14.5K Messages

8 years ago


@Jetmugg wrote:

 

How much different can a wired installation be to  to configuring an additional wireless box? 


Very different.  A wired receiver requires a wire to be run between the RG and the location of the receiver.  This is not something that all customers have the ability to do or would feel comfortable attempting to do.  A wireless receiver requires no wires to be run.  You simply plug the WAP into the RG.

 

AT&T had made a business policy decision to not allow self installs of wired receivers, but to provide the wireless receiver as self install option.  It's not a matter of agreeing or disagreeing with the policy, it's the policy decision that AT&T has made.  Since the wireless receivers can be used as wired receivers using Cat5 cable, it can be used for those who want a wired solution as opposed to a wireless solution.

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