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Tutor

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2 Messages

Sat, Jul 14, 2018 3:40 PM

Accessing Wrong local channels

I have the Fire TV stick and received only out of market local tv stations.  I live in the Washington DC tv market but get only local Baltimore stations.  This only occurs on my tv and not on e devices.  Please help.  Thanks. 

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JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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16.9K Messages

2 years ago

@Kailef, to be clear:

  • What are "your" locals is based on your zip code.
  • Whether you can view your locals on your non-GPS-containing device (i.e. not a mobile phone) depends on whether your IP geolocates to be in your home zip code or not.
  • The channels you can view on your mobile device that has a GPS facility are based on where your phone is located via geolocation, what locals are available to DTVN there, and what locals are available to your home zip code.

 

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bcbsncjlj

ACE - Expert

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19.1K Messages

2 years ago

Your cell phone uses GPS to determine your device location. GPS knows exactly where you are located. Your computer/streaming device uses your IP address for device location. Either your IP is not in the local location based on your billing zip code to receive the local or the geolocation services used by DTVN (as do the other streaming services) has miss-identified you as not being in the local area. Go here to see what some of the geolocations may think your IP is located.

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Tutor

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2 Messages

2 years ago

This does not address my problem. The geolocation services you included are correct, but I continue to receive out of market local channels.
bcbsncjlj

ACE - Expert

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19.1K Messages

2 years ago

Then its a DTVN issue and you will need to contact support.

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Kailef

Mentor

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71 Messages

2 years ago

Having the same issue. Can access local channels on my smartphone, but not my firestick, roku, or PC's. My geolocation on my IP shows I'm about 80 miles from where I am. I've called at&t over and over. They say they can't change the IP. I just got shipped a new modem and hooked it up today. Still shows I'm 80 miles away. Can AT&T fix the geolocation of my IP to match my billing/physical location? Or will a static IP that's based on my billing/physical location work? 

bcbsncjlj

ACE - Expert

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19.1K Messages

2 years ago

Nope. Have you verified your location using a geolocation service like here

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Kailef

Mentor

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71 Messages

2 years ago

Yes I have. It shows my geolocation is Owensboro, KY  when I'm actually in Marion, KY.

 

So AT&T can't change the IP. Can they assign a static IP that's geolocation is based on my city?

bcbsncjlj

ACE - Expert

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19.1K Messages

2 years ago

If you are a AT&T internet subscriber then you would have to inquire to them. But getting a staic address is no guarantee. The geolocation services can possibly still miss reading your location on occasion. I am sure they will be a charge also. 

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JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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16.9K Messages

2 years ago

AT&T does impose a monthly charge for a public static address block.  And, as bcbsncjlj said, there is no guarantee it will do a better job of geolocation than the one you have now.  IP Geolocation is an inexact science and I wish that supposedly intelligent people would quit thinking they're good enough to impose these sorts of restrictions.

 

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Kailef

Mentor

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71 Messages

2 years ago

I was just asking for help and if there was a possible way around it to fix it. No need to imply someone is ignorant by wording it as "supposedly intelligent people."

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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16.9K Messages

2 years ago


@Kailef wrote:

I was just asking for help and if there was a possible way around it to fix it. No need to imply someone is ignorant by wording it as "supposedly intelligent people."


I'm sorry, Kailef, that was not a jab at you.  Those "supposedly intelligent people" are at AT&T and the content providers who made the decision to block content based on IP geolocation.

 

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Kailef

Mentor

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71 Messages

2 years ago

Oh, okay. I wasn't sure, but I was real close to going with a static IP just to give it a try. A few years ago I bought a cheapo $35 HDTV antenna and it picks up NBC along with most of my other local channels. During a clear day it picks up NBC, CBS, 2 FOX channels, ABC, KET, WDKA, etc..I get around 22 channels. Half the time they go in and out. Like last night, it was a bit stormy and for some reason it sways that pole back and forth a bit causing NBC to go out. Ended up missing out on American Ninja Warrior. Going to have to watch it today on NBC On Demand. Luckily, even though I don't get NBC local channel streaming on DirecTV Now, I at last get the on demand so I can watch it the next day. I suppose I'll try investing first in a much better HDTV antenna. Maybe I'll try for one of those $100-$150 channel masters. I've read online they're very good and much better than these $30 plastic shield-type antennas that I have. If one of those antennas don't do it, then my only other option is to try a static IP, but I'm not sure I want to do pay $15 a month for a static IP just to get my local channels. Defeats the whole purpose of cutting the cord for streaming service to save extra $.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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16.9K Messages

2 years ago

OTA TV antenna needs vary drastically based on your location, the locations of the broadcast antenna and the actual frequency used by the stations.  A mudflap antenna on the wall of my office picks up quite a few local stations, but not the CBS affiliate (who is only 30 miles away, but on VHF-High) or the ABC affiliate (who is 60 miles away).  I had to get an antenna specifically designed to bring in VHF-Hi, point it at the station, and mount it in the attic in order to get the CBS affiliate.  I'm going to try putting a UHF antenna in the attic to see if that gets me the ABC affiliate.

 

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Kailef

Mentor

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71 Messages

2 years ago

Would a splitter work the same way in reverse? By that, I mean hook up 2 antennas to a splitter so it'll pick up all the channels on one TV? Like you said, you had to get a specific antenna meant to pull in VHF-Hi.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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16.9K Messages

2 years ago


@Kailef wrote:

Would a splitter work the same way in reverse? By that, I mean hook up 2 antennas to a splitter so it'll pick up all the channels on one TV? Like you said, you had to get a specific antenna meant to pull in VHF-Hi.


A splitter may work depending on your situation.  Read this excellent article (http://www.hdtvprimer.com/antennas/merging.html ) if you want additional information.  For my use case, a diplexor (where the frequencies are filtered in certain directions) is better than a splitter.

 

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