Announcements
HBO Max - where HBO meets so much more!

Teacher

 • 

2 Messages

Fri, Jun 7, 2019 5:17 PM

FCC Greenlight to block Robocalls

There was a FCC ruling today that permits wireless carriers to block unwanted “Robocalls”.  A friend of mine is on a competitive carrier and they receive a caller ID of “telemarketer” on screen when receiving these calls. Does ATT plan on implementing a similar feature or blocking these by default as permitted by the FCC now?

Responses

Contributor

 • 

2 Messages

9 months ago

I get so many of these calls and I don’t want to have to look at these calls. This was extremely frustrating because I was a health proxy for a family member and I had to answer every call. This must stop because I have anxiety every time the phone rings.

Contributor

 • 

1 Message

9 months ago

I'm concerned if these creeps can charge a long distance call to my phone number since I now seem to be calling myself..  Anyone have any info on this?  Thanks very much.

spoom2

ACE - Master

 • 

7.1K Messages

9 months ago

That's the way they spam you.  You know you don't call yourself so block it.  

This is a user to user help forum. It is not an AT&T support site. I am not an AT&T employee, read the ACE's disclaimer at the bottom of this post

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
romad

Scholar

 • 

345 Messages

9 months ago

I'm concerned if these creeps can charge a long distance call to my phone number since I now seem to be calling myself.. Anyone have any info on this?

No, they are just SPOOFING the Caller ID system; that doesn't translate as a charged call from that number. Of course when you "block" a number you're actually only blocking legitimate calls from the spoofed number, not blocking the robocaller's actual numbers.

 

Some steps that the cell carriers and landline phone companies need to do are:

1. Disable Caller ID Blocking permanently

2. Change the software so that Caller ID only shows the actual number from which a calling coming along with the full name of the account holder for that number.

3. Just as the phone companies list the numbers you have called in your monthly statement, they should also list the numbers from which you received calls along with date and time.

pgrey

ACE - Master

 • 

3.4K Messages

9 months ago


@romad wrote:

I'm concerned if these creeps can charge a long distance call to my phone number since I now seem to be calling myself.. Anyone have any info on this?

No, they are just SPOOFING the Caller ID system; that doesn't translate as a charged call from that number. Of course when you "block" a number you're actually only blocking legitimate calls from the spoofed number, not blocking the robocaller's actual numbers.

 

Some steps that the cell carriers and landline phone companies need to do are:

1. Disable Caller ID Blocking permanently

2. Change the software so that Caller ID only shows the actual number from which a calling coming along with the full name of the account holder for that number.

3. Just as the phone companies list the numbers you have called in your monthly statement, they should also list the numbers from which you received calls along with date and time.


 Yep, @romad, this is spot-on, the "spoofing the callers own number" literally takes maybe 5 seconds, tops, to do (takes less time than logging onto AT&T to check your bill, for example, and about as much "technical expertise", it's VERY easy).  Not sure why people get so "weirded out" by this one.  It's no more "threatening/unusual" than getting a piece of junk mail, in your mailbox, addressed to you, directly, from some company that "bought your info" from a (probably unscrupulous) vendor.

 

I don't think that the Caller ID control will have much effect, give the proliferation of VOIP spoofs through VPN re-directs (see my longer response a few posts back).

 

The change to be inclusive of "Caller ID", is tricky, for two-fold reasons.

For one, this can't really do much, when spammers sign up for "real VOIP accounts", using a fabricated name (which is SUPER easy to do, I bet I could automate signing up for 100 such lines, given an hour of scripting).

What do you do with "older systems", or "non-compatible" systems, I bet there are a LOT in the US alone, let alone world-wide, so you'd have to choose to either not receive any of these calls (possibly blocking critical calls, from someone on an older/non-compliant operator), or go back to "manually screening", the only truly effective system currently, IMHO.

 

On your third point, AT&T DOES include these calls, unless they're from "invalid numbers", where the caller has spoofed the whole header, from the operator.  

These calls, IMO, can just be "auto dropped", and probably most are these days, by more current filtering systems (I haven't seen one of these for at least 6 months now, or at least I'm pretty sure I haven't).

*If this (or another post in this thread) fixes your problem/issue, please mark it as "accept-solution", and I'll tag it, to make it easier for others to find the answer(s). FYI: I'm an AT&T end-user, just like most of us in the forum. Thanks.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Contributor

 • 

1 Message

9 months ago

Red blinking lights on broadband

spoom2

ACE - Master

 • 

7.1K Messages

9 months ago

What's that have to do with robocalls, spoofing or spam?  Try posting your question in the Internet forum. 

This is a user to user help forum. It is not an AT&T support site. I am not an AT&T employee, read the ACE's disclaimer at the bottom of this post

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Tutor

 • 

9 Messages

9 months ago

A better solution would be that I get paid $1 (or more) for every Robo call I receive. At&t should credit my account $1 (or more) for each robocall they send to my phone. At&t can then collect this money and its other expenses from the robo callers. 

QuarryRye

ACE - Master

 • 

3.2K Messages

8 months ago

@NoMoreScams1 wrote:

A better solution would be that I get paid $1 (or more) for every Robo call I receive. At&t should credit my account $1 (or more) for each robocall they send to my phone. At&t can then collect this money and its other expenses from the robo callers.

Well, you know that won't happen. How is AT&T supposed to know if an automated call is a scam or not. I get automated calls from my pharmacy to let me know when a prescription needs to be picked up. Are those supposed to be illegal? How is AT&T supposed to know ahead of time if a call is fraudulent or not? Do you want AT&T to listen to all your calls to see if it's a telemarketer or not?

**Disclaimer: I don't work for AT&T, have never worked for AT&T, and have never been compensated by them in any way, shape, or form**
Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
pgrey

ACE - Master

 • 

3.4K Messages

8 months ago


@QuarryRye wrote:

@NoMoreScams1 wrote:

A better solution would be that I get paid $1 (or more) for every Robo call I receive. At&t should credit my account $1 (or more) for each robocall they send to my phone. At&t can then collect this money and its other expenses from the robo callers.

Well, you know that won't happen. How is AT&T supposed to know if an automated call is a scam or not. I get automated calls from my pharmacy to let me know when a prescription needs to be picked up. Are those supposed to be illegal? How is AT&T supposed to know ahead of time if a call is fraudulent or not? Do you want AT&T to listen to all your calls to see if it's a telemarketer or not?


@QuarryRye I LOVE this $1/call idea, personally, even if it's not practical and will never happen ;-]

 

They can view the call-metadata (header) info, and see that it's either NULL (blank), or along the lines of "fraud alert" or "IRS" or, some such, which clearly are an (actual) fraud.
This part I really wish they would do, and think they should do, it's "low hanging fruit", in the world of fraud-calls, IME.

 

What they CANNOT do, without worldwide-carrier cooperation/integration, is tell the difference between a "Joe's Pharmacy" spoof with their easily-obtainable number (using your reference), and the one that came via a VOIP/VPN re-direct, say from somewhere in the south-Pacific (not picking on any particular country here, just choosing a random region with a few countries that have less-strict laws in this regard).

Until this is (somehow, I really have NO idea how this can happen, in real-world terms, particularly today's "real-world") a reality, I fully believe (coming from a coding and s/w design background, with quite a bit of network-design tied in there) that this problem will remain as it stands today.

I hope I'm wrong, and there's some "really clever" way to use data-analysis to amalgamate these, but I seriously doubt it (it's basically an NP-complete coding problem, when you get down to nuts-bolts).

*If this (or another post in this thread) fixes your problem/issue, please mark it as "accept-solution", and I'll tag it, to make it easier for others to find the answer(s). FYI: I'm an AT&T end-user, just like most of us in the forum. Thanks.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
pgrey

ACE - Master

 • 

3.4K Messages

8 months ago

What you can do here, IF you are using a VOIP line (which is probably 99% of our numbers these days), is set up a "bot", which you can enable, as soon as you realize it's one of these callers.

I've done a couple "test trials" with this, manually triggered, and it's pretty hilarious.  While the bot isn't 100% on "sensing" the callers intent, it does a pretty good job of "leading them on" at least through a short banter, asking them about the weather, how they're doing, etc, and generally driving them nuts (the frustration is VERY obvious in the caller's voice).  This may result in your line getting removed from some of these "lists", if they know it's a "lost cause", due to your automation.

 

Making this "fully automated" is tough though, for more or less the same metadata reasons I mentioned in my other post.  I'm open to ideas on this one though.

*If this (or another post in this thread) fixes your problem/issue, please mark it as "accept-solution", and I'll tag it, to make it easier for others to find the answer(s). FYI: I'm an AT&T end-user, just like most of us in the forum. Thanks.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Contributor

 • 

2 Messages

7 months ago

FCC is ineffective. Do Not Call Registry is a joke. The primary irritant spam telemarketing call displays numbers that appear to be near your location but turn out to be numbers that are no longer in service. I guess detecting that by a huge technology company like ATT is just too much. Telemarketing scum don't have to have much spam savvy to get past ATT defenses, which is basically nothing. 

spoom2

ACE - Master

 • 

7.1K Messages

7 months ago

Understand your rant, but how much of this topic did you actually read?

This is a user to user help forum. It is not an AT&T support site. I am not an AT&T employee, read the ACE's disclaimer at the bottom of this post

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
pgrey

ACE - Master

 • 

3.4K Messages

7 months ago

Yep, @razorback26 aways up this thread, I talk about how this has to be a "worldwide effort/specification" for this to "actually work".

@spoom2 is 100% right, go back and read post #47, where I specifically talk about how almost ALL of the current implementations (FCC or ATT, or ...) can be subverted, using a simple VPN-redirect.

 

Until we have more of a "worldwide-carrier-consortium effort", or someone invents a "VERY clever algorithmic way to offset the VPN problem", we're sort of "stuck" here, IME.

This is coming from a "networking-code perspective" anyway (my background is in design/architecture/coding of various h/w and s/w code/tests/engines, often at the low/kernel-level).

*If this (or another post in this thread) fixes your problem/issue, please mark it as "accept-solution", and I'll tag it, to make it easier for others to find the answer(s). FYI: I'm an AT&T end-user, just like most of us in the forum. Thanks.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.