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Voyager

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6 Messages

Sunday, July 24th, 2022 5:57 PM

Closed

ATT IP Exits for international roaming

Hi!  I need to know the international roaming IP exits.  Are they always US IP addresses?  If so, which IPs are used?  I need this for allowing employees who are allowed to be international, and restricting employees who are not supposed to work internationally.  For example, an employee who is roaming in Chile or any other country, what IP address shows up?

Thanks!

ACE - Expert

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64.7K Messages

2 years ago

There is no such thing. IP addresses are dynamic and would be assigned by whatever carrier the phone is roaming on, not by ATT.

Voyager

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6 Messages

2 years ago

I thought the same Sandblaster, but your answer is inconsistent with the articles referenced in a basic search.  Can you confirm, have you tested this?  Here's a search...

https://www.google.com/search?q=att+roaming+internationally+ip+address

ACE - Expert

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64.7K Messages

2 years ago

I’ll admit I’ve never checked what IP address I was assigned when roaming and even if I had, I doubt I’d know whether it was a US IP or not but I didn’t see anything in that search that contradicted what I said. The ones I checked said the same thing. The IP assigned has to be on that carrier’s network, otherwise data wouldn’t work.

Voyager

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6 Messages

2 years ago

@sandblaster , can you share an article that shows your IP address would be the local roaming country IP address?  Here are articles that show the IP address would be the SIM's home country IP address.

US IP address when internationally roaming:  "When I'm roaming internationally from my mobile, why am I assigned a US IP address?"

"

US IP address when internationally roaming:  "Why my IP address goes back to the country where the SIM card is issued when I use the cellular data roaming abroad?

Because the cellular data traffic goes over the local cellular network, to the SIM issuer’s network, who then makes the request on your behalf to the Internet at large. This allows the SIM issuer to apply any constraints to what you can access, meter your usage and so on. Since the actual traffic to the Internet comes from your SIM issuer’s network, you get an IP address owned by that SIM issuer, which is almost certainly one from that country.

"

US IP address when internationally roaming: "That is the rule. Your break-out point to the internet is always your home network. The Packet Gateway (be it GGSN in 3G or PD-GW in 4G) of your home network will assign the IP address. Also it will have a tunnel to the responsible access network node across network boundaries."

ACE - Expert

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64.7K Messages

2 years ago

For one, all of those “articles” are on a website I have no confidence in, so I wouldn’t take any of those answers. That first one I believe is just flat wrong, that second one doesn’t even make sense. I do know how IP networks work and as I said, the IP address assigned has to be from the network you are connected to, that’s just how the IP protocol works. Now is it possible that all traffic from a roaming device gets forwarded or routed through the home carrier of the roaming device, maybe, but logic tells me that’s not true either. Any data used when roaming is tracked by the roaming carrier and they report that back to ATT.

Voyager

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6 Messages

2 years ago

There would be no other way for att to validate data usage other than if the traffic is routed to an att node.

ACE - Expert

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64.7K Messages

2 years ago

There would be no other way for att to validate data usage other than if the traffic is routed to an att node.

That’s not true. Of course there is another way and I’m quite confident this is how it is actually done. Data usage is reported by the roaming carrier. ATT has no idea how much data you use when roaming until the roaming carrier reports it.

New Member

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1 Message

1 year ago

Confidently incorrect answers from a "community expert". This is the internet of the 2020s. The new mainstream.

Contributor

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3 Messages

1 month ago

Yep. Much wrong info here from supposed experts.

I’m roaming on Telstra in in Melbourne, Australia right now, and my IP address is 108.147.172.112, which belongs to AT&T.

This is always the case when I roam internationally. Interestingly, the IP address usually does not have a geolocation associated with it, but traceroutes can expose where my data exits the AT&T network onto the public internet. It doesn’t always make sense; when I was roaming in central/southern Mexico, I often hit Bay Area POPs, even though Dallas would be much more more logical. And now that I’m in Australia, my traffic seems to exit in Dallas, even though most of the transpacific cables hit Southern California.

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