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lindee3479

Contributor

 • 

3 Messages

Sat, Mar 24, 2012 5:51 PM

Setting up Cisco Router behind the AT&T 3801HGV Router

Before I got new U-Verse service (Internet & TV) 2 weeks ago, I had a home network set up with a Cisco Linksys E2500 dual-band router.  I have a Dell desktop PC running Windows 7 and 10 wireless devices.

I followed another forum members directions pertaining to bridging the 2Wire router and the Cisco router, changing the IP address of the 2Wire router and turning off the wireless function.  I set these up so that the 2Wire router was behind the Cisco router.  Everything worked just the way I intended until today.

There was a power failure at my home yesterday from an outside source.  The 2Wire router and the Cisco router returned to their factory settings for the most part.

Now, I cannot change the 2Wire router's IP address.  I have tried it several times and cannot get the router to respond.  

There are other parts of the 2Wire router that will not let me change (system password)

*
Has there been  any system changes that would effct the 2Wire router?  Should I reset the 2Wire router to it's factory settings and start again?

Thank you for your help.

Responses

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

Computer-Joe

Master

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5.9K Messages

8 years ago

Not sure if we're just talking semantics, but the Cisco should be bhind the 2WIRE. You can follow these directions if you'd like to try again. If your changing IP addresses it should be on the Cisco not the 2WIRE.

 

 

 

This is what I did to use an "internal" router (when I had Uverse)(3800 gateway). I set my "internal" (Cisco) router to use DHCP for the WAN address, plugged it's WAN port in to a LAN port on the 2WIRE, reboot the "internal" router, let the 2WIRE assign a local address to the "internal" router and then set that address to the DMZ in the 2WIRE's management interface. When I go to the "internal" router's management interface it shows as having the same WAN, gateway, and DNS addresses that the 2WIRE uses.

I set the "internal" router to assign addresses to "my" side of the network in a different IP range than what the 2WIRE uses (192.168.2.* instead of 192.168.1.*) but using the same subnet mask (255.255.255.0). My internet works fine with no interuptions and local network tasks (back ups, streaming, etc.) work as expected. I can also still access the 2WIRE from "my" side of the network when I need to without having to change any network settings or swap any cables. Leave DHCP running on the 2WIRE. You do not need to disable the firewall in the 2WIRE as the DMZ will open a pinhole through it to the address you pick (your internal router). If you have existing wireless on your router that your satisfied with and want to keep, just make sure to turn off the wireless in the RG.


If you currently have your router behind a basic DSL or Cable modem, Your setup will be pretty much the same. The 2WIRE will replace your modem, then go into your existing router and change it's internet connection type to Dynamic or DHCP. Then change it's internal network IP adress and DHCP Pool and you should be good to go.

 

 




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hpmsrm

Master

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5.7K Messages

8 years ago

Kind of sounds like a factory reset, using the reset button, might be the best way to try loosening things up so you can re-enter your settings.  At least that is what I would do.  Nothing to lose at this point...right?

 

There is a firmware update that has been rolling out across the country for about a month.  But, unless you've been checking for it there is no way to know if it has happened in your area yet. 

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lindee3479

Contributor

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3 Messages

8 years ago

Thank you for the reply and the directions.  Yes, I was attempting to put the Cisco Router behind the 2Wire. I will give it another try using your advice.

lindee3479

Contributor

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3 Messages

8 years ago

Thank you. I'll search for the firmware update also.

Contributor

 • 

1 Message

8 years ago

I have a similar configuration but also want to route my AT&T-provided static IP addresses to my Cisco router (actually PIX515) behind the 2Wire 3801HGV.

 

What is the recommended configuration to place the 3801HGV into bridge only mode and let my PIX handle the static block?

 

Seems I would need to have the PIX assume the Public IP address of the 3801HGV, as AT&T is currently routing the static block to it.

 

 

SomeJoe7777

Expert

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9.4K Messages

8 years ago


@jrisbell wrote:

I have a similar configuration but also want to route my AT&T-provided static IP addresses to my Cisco router (actually PIX515) behind the 2Wire 3801HGV.

 

What is the recommended configuration to place the 3801HGV into bridge only mode and let my PIX handle the static block?

 

Seems I would need to have the PIX assume the Public IP address of the 3801HGV, as AT&T is currently routing the static block to it.


 

Unfortunately, the 2Wire router does not allow you to do this.  To have another router handle the static IPs would require you to be able to insert a static route into the 2Wire for the static IP range, but the 2Wire offers no facility or interface to insert a static route.

 

To use your static IPs, the machines using each static IP must be directly connected to the 2Wire.  Alternatively, you can use a single static IP on the WAN interface of your router, and then NAT everything else to that IP using your Cisco.

 

Contributor

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2 Messages

8 years ago

This is the same setup that I currently have implemented. Although maybe not recommended by AT&T to use another router inline I set it up anyways because I require internal routing for VMs and other servers running within the network. One major problem I've came across is that DD-WRT has a bug with static routing after you set the DMZ+ for that internal router. It seems the automatic routing(RIPv2??) is not adding the appropriate routes. I've corrected it by manually adding a route. I think this is a bug with the 3801 communicating the RIP data to the Cisco router with DD-WRT. Possible difference in packet data. 

 

I would like to know if anyone else has seen this problem in the past with the routing? Cat Happy

SomeJoe7777

Expert

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9.4K Messages

8 years ago

RIP is a routing protocol for routers to tell each other about routes they know about.

The 2Wire series of gateways used by AT&T does not run any form of any routing protocol, including RIP. Therefore no routes are going to get shared between the routers.
wboyd

Tutor

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6 Messages

8 years ago

I have a similar situation where I have a my Cisco WRVS440n setup behind the CHEKHOV - my setup seems to be correct and everything is working - except I cannot access my "internal" router via the Internet.  I have a Dynamic DNS service that I am using for name resolution and that all seem to work (it sees my IP given by ATT), but when I try to open a web page on one of the machines on my home network (or logon to my VPN) - nothing!  I cannot connect with the IP or name.

 

Anyone have any Ideas?  Do I need to get a static IP from ATT?

 

Thanks,

Wayne

wboyd

Tutor

 • 

6 Messages

8 years ago

I have a similar situation where I have a my Cisco WRVS440n setup behind the 3801HGV - my setup seems to be correct and everything is working - except I cannot access my "internal" router via the Internet.  I have a Dynamic DNS service that I am using for name resolution and that all seem to work (it sees my IP given by ATT), but when I try to open a web page on one of the machines on my home network (or logon to my VPN) - nothing!  I cannot connect with the IP or name.

 

Anyone have any Ideas?  Do I need to get a static IP from ATT?

 

Thanks,

Wayne

 
Seems I had a spell check issue....
 
SomeJoe7777

Expert

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9.4K Messages

8 years ago

See the following post for instructions to set up your own router using the DMZPlus feature:

http://forums.att.com/t5/Residential-Gateway/U-verse-for-BUSINESS-2Wire-3600HGV-bridge-mode-or-another-AT-amp/m-p/2707755#M182

 

wboyd

Tutor

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6 Messages

8 years ago

Thanks SomeJoe!....I canged one setting on my router and bam...all is good.

wboyd

Tutor

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6 Messages

8 years ago

Opps...I think that I spoke to soon...basic services work - Internet, email, etc...but port 22 seems to be blocked and my home network relies on ssh for the ESXi server and my Linux machines.  Is there anyway around this?

wboyd

Tutor

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6 Messages

8 years ago

I am also having issues hitting my machines via the Internet....?

SomeJoe7777

Expert

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9.4K Messages

8 years ago

In at least some cases, inbound port 22 is blocked and reserved by AT&T for their equipment.

You can get around this in 2 ways:

1. Purchase static IPs instead of using DMZPlus. No inbound ports are blocked on static IPs.

2. Adjust the firewall on your router to have a pinhole with port translation. e.g. Inbound port 2222 to the outside IP gets forwarded to your ESXi server on port 22. Then, when you need to connect to the ESXi server's SSH port, just make a connection to your outside IP address on port 2222.

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