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adam2015
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12 Messages

Sun, Dec 13, 2015 5:21 PM

Uverse wireless extensition

We recently had some guests who told me WiFi coverage in our upstairs wasn't working. This is the same area where our Mac computer and printer are in our home office, but those devices weren't having the same issues as their iPhones. I tested my own iPhone in the area and it was indeed losing the connection.

 

After a lot of research, I purchased a D-Link 1650 and hooked it up to our 3801HGV RG. Instead of using it as an extender of the current 2.4GHz signal from the 3801, I used another post in this forum to set it up as an access point. It is currently working beautifully with both 2.4GHz and 5GHz signals. The old WiFi signal from the 3801 is now disabled.

 

I understand the 5GHz signal is blazing fast on the first floor, but not as good going through walls or other obstructions. The 2.4GHz signal however does not seem overwhelming differnent than 3801's original signal via both the Mac or iPhones on the second floor.

 

I'm curious if it would be better to use the 1650 as an extender of the 3801's original WiFI signal, or if I have chosen the best setup. I like the unit, but only want to keep it if I can ensure we get better coverage throughout the house without losing speed.

 

If it helps SpeedTest.net results can vary widely on the second floor using cell phones and the computer. It's good, just not as good as I would expect.

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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26.6K Messages

6 y ago

Most Wi-Fi Access Points with internal antennas generate a signal in a horizontal plane, i.e. like a donut (albiet a rather large one) laying flat around the Access Point.  Usually the ideal arrangement is an access point on each floor.  If you have external antenna, you could try to orient them such that they cover a different area.  If not, you can try turning the access point on its side (so that its "horizontal plane" includes rooms on other floors), but you may find that this leaves areas on the main floor under served.

 

You can purchase a wireless extender for devices on the other floor to connect to, and let it connect to the access point on the main floor.  The issue with this would be if the other devices can't get a good signal, the wireless extender may not either (though it will have bigger antennas and more power to throw at the problem).  This also causes increased latency and consumes more Wi-Fi spectrum (because each packet must be broadcast between the client and the extender and between the extender and the original access point).

 

Another possibility would be to use a pair of Power Line bridges to connect to an access point on the second floor, but this means an access point for the second floor, and the power line adapters for each floor to make the connection.

 

adam2015

Tutor

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12 Messages

6 y ago

I agree with your ideas, but this home lacks a wired network. Running ethernet cables in the areas you describe will not work or is simply not feasable.

 

This is a typical 3,000 sq.ft. suburban home that I expect should be covered or at least nearly all covered. The RG and new D-Link unit are currently next to each other (since they are wired using the D-Link as an access point). They are located on the first floor in a generally centeralized location.

adam2015

Tutor

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12 Messages

6 y ago

Thank you. I appreciate the insight as always as I try troubleshoot these minor issues.

adam2015

Tutor

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12 Messages

5 y ago

I wanted to follow up with this to share the secret was PowerLine adapters. I cannot say this enough. Using the RG and Dlink extender referenced above through my home's electrical wires gives me full coverage downstairs (AT&T RG) and upstairs (Dlink) on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. Thanks for the help.

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