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Tutor

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3 Messages

Wed, Jun 20, 2018 4:03 PM

Switching from Uverse WiFi to Google WiFi Help

Hello friends,

I just purchased the Google WiFi 3 puck system to replace my AT&T router (keeping modem portion). I need more in-home coverage.

I was told to do this in steps and I would like to know if I have this right so I can keep the same SSID and password and avoid Double NAT (not sure what that is).

Step 1; Open the AT&T page on computer.
Step 2; Go into settings an enable "detection of router behind router."
Step 3; Go to WiFi settings and disable both 2.4 and 5.0.
Step 4; Save. (Not sure if I need to power down and restart?)
Step 5; Plug the Ethernet cable into Google WiFi (1st puck) and turn on.
Step 6; Open app on phone and when prompted, add in the same SSID and password as you had on AT&T.
Step 7; Save and connect.
Step 8; I should now see the same name in my WiFi search as I had with AT&T.
Step 8; If all goes well at this point, all my current electronics, phone, TV, tablets, wireless cameras shouldstill be connected.

Please let me know if I missed anything. I would like to do this with no issues like Double NAT.

Thank you all for your support.

 Mickey

Responses

Tutor

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3 Messages

2 years ago

Hello again,

 

After doing more research, I find myself no further along than I was yesterday. It seems either no one has attempted to do what I am trying, or if they have, it was never shared online. That is too bad as it would probably help a lot of people. Here is something I will share that I found. It is not exactly what I am searching for, but it might help some of you.

 

How To: Setup Google Wifi with AT&T residential gateway with both wired and wireless devices

 

I was surprised at the lack of documentation for this, so I figured I'd type out what eventually worked for me. Google Wifi customer service was no help on this, and actually a little misleading, so I had to figure most of this out on my own...

The instructions included with Google Wifi only take you so far, and assume (I think) that you are using all wireless devices. The problem that I had was that once I got my new wireless network set up, it didn't recognize all the wired devices that I had running to the gateway (including 2 Chromecasts which were now unrecognizable because they were technically on a different network).

To fix this, and get Google Wifi to recognize both your wired and wireless devices, you have to configure your Google Wifi primary point to accept the wired devices through its LAN port. Simple concept, but easier said than done.

For reference, the AT&T gateway that I did this on is a Pace 5268AC. The process for accessing the gateway settings, and the user interface once you get there, are pretty similar across most AT&T gateways.

First, I recommend unplugging all wired network devices except for the Google Wifi primary point. This makes it easier later on to identify which device you will forward all traffic to.

Once you've done that, you'll need to set up the Google Wifi primary point to be DHCP instead of Static IP (this enables DMZ+ mode on the AT&T gateway). To do this, unplug the network cable form your already configured Google Wifi primary point until the light glows orange. From the app, find the Advanced Networking section in the Network & General section of settings. Under the WAN settings, select DHCP and back out to save the settings. Plug your primary point back in. The app's instructions are pretty good on this.

Second, enable DMZ+ on the AT&T gateway to pass traffic through to the Google Wifi primary point. To do this from the AT&T gateway: Settings -> Firewall -> Applications, pinholes and DMZ. There you'll see a list of wireless and wired devices. If you unplugged all your wired devices, then the only wired device on that list will be the Google Wifi primary point. You should notice that the name is pretty cryptic, which is why unplugging everything else makes it easier to identify this device. Click the link to "Choose" that device, then change the setting down below to "Allow all applications (DMZ+ mode)." Then click save.

Finally, you need to let the primary point know that it is now a public facing device. From the gateway menu: Settings -> LAN -> IP Address Allocation. In the settings box for the primary point (same device name you saw earlier), change the address assignment from Private to Public (it may have changed this setting automatically, but check it anyway). Save whatever changes you make.

After all those new configurations were saved, I shut everything down (Google Wifi and AT&T gateway). While it's all shut down, connect all your wired devices to your network switch, and then connect the switch to the LAN port on the Google Wifi primary point. When you restart everything, all of your wired and wireless devices should be visible from the devices section of the Google Wifi app.

Just FYI, you'll also want to turn off the Wifi signals of the AT&T gateway, but there are plenty of other places to find instructions for that. Good luck!

 

 

 

New Member

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1 Message

Thank you!!! This exactly what I am doing and your write up is super helpful.

Contributor

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1 Message

2 years ago

Thanks for the info and details. I'm thinking about getting the Google wifi system too since the wifi extenders that AT&T gave me are pretty bad.

 

Can you share a review on how the Google wifi system has worked for you since you installed them? Is it worth switching to the Google wifi system?

 

-Price

Tutor

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4 Messages

2 years ago

I just got Google Wifi (a 3-pack) yesterday and have been STRUGGLING for over 24 hours to get things to work properly. I also have AT&T U-Verse, 1,000 Mbps with the same Pace 5268AC router as you, so I'm going to try this in the next 30 minutes when I leave work. I'm actually going to print this page out before I leave the office.

 

I had everything set up [nearly] perfectly last night--all three points had excellent signal and super fast speed. Except I had two other problems. I had the Double NAT issue. It doesn't really affect performance--but if you do gaming, it can be challenging. My Xbox immediately informed me about it and provided a link with ways to get around it. (Basically, it's a complication that occurs when you have a router behind another router.) The other problem I had was, I was forced to remove the ethernet cable from my main Cable/DVR box, as it was the most centrally located in the house. I plugged that into my primary Google Wifi point instead. Then ran another ethernet cable from the LAN port on the Google Wifi into my Cable/DVR box. The Cable/DVR box didn't like that. At. All. All the channels would work, but they would freeze after about 10 seconds, requiring me to turn it off and back on. So I removed that Google Wifi point and set things back up how they were.

 

Around Midnight, I moved my primary Google Wifi point back in my office where the Pace 5268AC gateway is. The first couple of attempts, the Google Wifi app kept saying that my modem was not sending an internet signal to the Google Wifi point. I kept trying and finally succeeded. But now, I can't get the other two to connect. When I try to set up the other two Google Wifi points, I keep getting a message that they're "out of range," which is weird, because I have three in a row sitting INCHES from each other. This is frustrating.

I called Google and they weren't much help. AT&T said they'd send me a "different" gateway that was "more compatible" with third party routers. But that won't arrive until tomorrow. So I've been at work "Googling" (how ironic...🙄) solutions to all my issues.

I think I've found two possible solutions to the "out of range" issue on other forums. But you've presented a pretty good workaround for the Double NAT issue. I'm going to try it when I get home. My only concern is that enabiling DMZ+ mode on the IP address of the primary Google Wifi point will essentially allow ALL traffic in/out. This could give others a chance to maliciously circumvent the firewall, which could be a problem for any computers on your network. Other forums I've read today have suggested that you just enable DMZ+ mode on the IP address of the gaming system itself, becuase there's very little anyone can do to hack a gaming system or infect it with a virus or other malicious code.

Anyway, I'm ready to make this work. If I get everything working today, I'm curious to see what kind of gateway is coming in the mail tomorrow. I was told all I would need to do is unplug anything plugged into the current one and replug it into the new one without having to reconfigure any settings. We'll see. I'll let you know how it goes.

Tutor

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6 Messages

2 years ago

Wow.  THANKS for this very useful information!

 

I was about to move my Google WiFi primary hub to be upstream of everything wired to flatten the network and eliminate all of the issues with the two subnets and double NAT.

 

 

Thinking about it I was terrified of the idea that all of the Uverse Video traffic would have to pass through the Google Wifi hub, too.  I guess that will work with the setup you found.

 

I'm curious if you can still connect to the Uverse gateway through the Google wifi hub but I'll know very soon.    Smiley Wink

 

Didja notice that there's nothing in the Google Wifi documentation that says what the LAN port can be used for other than to connect to other pucks?  It would be handy to know if that port is bridged and if the puck-puck connection is on a separate LAN. I don't even know if it's supposed to be LAN<->LAN port or LAN->Wifi port.  Hacking awaits.

 

(BTW, I suppose you found what an adventure it is to Google "Google WiFi" )

 

 

 

Tutor

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6 Messages

1 year ago

Update:   My flattening is almost completely done.  This was a project full of pitfalls and maybe not for mere mortals.

One tip from me is that the MAC address for the Google Hub is on the bottom of the puck so that will help in finding it to set it up with the DMZ+ on the UVerse gateway.

 

One thing that killed me was trying to use the same IP network through the Google Wifi Hub as it was it was before I added the Google WiFi.

 

The key thing to do is to change the network being served with DHCP by the Uverse gateway.  Even with the Google hub getting the DMZ setup public IP address with DHCP, if the gateway is still set to DHCP the 192.168.1.x  network that you want to migrate to the Google main hub, the Google Wifi utility will fail miserably.  I suspect that the Google router or the gateway still sees the same LAN subnet on both sides.  It will error out if you set the 192.168.1.x subnet.

 

With considerable effort, I was able to change the gateway to DHCP the 172.16.x.x subnet.  onsider that I was trying to configure teh gateway using wireless devices on the Google Wifi hubs I was configuring. I connected a laptop to the ethernet port on the gateway to connect. I have the gateway address set to 172.16.x.254 and I expect that I can always find it there, even by going through the downstream Google router.

 

When I connected the Uverse DVR to be downstream of the Google Hub, it acted very weirdly, where the programming would only run for a few seconds.  I ended up connecting the UVerse DVR directly to the gateway.  As it stands then, the DVR is getting the 172.16.x.x LAN IP address and it's working.  I will make another attempt but I think that the Uverse network sets up a VLAN and that won't cross a router.  THIS MEANS THAT THE UVERSE LAN HAS TO BE UPSTREAM OF THE GOOGLE WIFI ROUTER. That may also apply to all of the Uverse receivers which is going to a major pain in my house.  I'll hack again to verify that.  If this is not your experience please let me know.

 

Tutor

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6 Messages

1 year ago

I just read that the UVerse RG LAN uses multicast and IGMP to connect to the UVerse STBs and DVR, so it's never going to work through another router./

https://forums.att.com/t5/AT-T-Internet-Equipment/Motorola-NVG510-quot-Cascaded-Router-quot/td-p/3869499

 

I'm resigned to having a separate LAN for Uverse .

That's a pain for me but I can make it work anon.  For example, I have my one remote STB connected with Powerline Ethernet (HomePlug.)  I'll have to set a dedicated pair for that temporarily.

 

One effect of having the two LANs and subnets is that devices on the main LAN will not be able to connect to the Uverse equipment.  Example: The Uverse remote app on my wireless devices cannot see the DVR, although apps that go through the cloud will still work.  

 

I'm left with a not ideal setup, but it is ironically what I had in mind before I got Uverse and early on discovered that UVerse video works fine on a single flat switched network.

 

Contributor

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1 Message

1 year ago

I am also having similar setup issue, not able to connect Uverse TV set top boxes thru Google WiFi network. Is there a way to work TV connections. It is very difficult to run two networks.

 

Thank you

Contributor

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1 Message

1 year ago

Hey, your guide is very helpful! I just want to clarify some thinfs during my set up. After setting everything up with DMZ+ mode, are all the wired devices going into the primary Google WiFI point, or are they still going into the Pace modem? Also, with the Google WiFi managing all the traffic, can you still achieve Gigabit speeds? Thank you!

Tutor

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6 Messages

11 months ago


In order for Uverse TV to work on the LAN, the "second router" and the Uverse RG have to support IGMPv3 Multicasting and the Google Wifi doesn't.

See https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/googlewifi/QsbUJ_itQMo;context-place=forum/googlewifi

 

Uverse TV will not work wirelessly through Google Wifi, but you could always leave WiFi enabled on the UverseRG with a distinct SSID on a dedicated WiFi channel and use that WiFi for wireless Uverse TV nodes.

 

I just had my speed upgraded to 100mbs where the tech had to do a factory reset of the configuration on the RG.  I'm scrambling now to put the configuration back they way that works.  *sigh* . Gotta save some documentation.

The tech said that UverseTV works best with WIRED links if there is a dedicated switch for UVerse.  I said I was using the switch ports in the RG but he thought it was better to use a separate dedicated switch.  Take that with grain of salt but I'll try it.

 

Summary:  You need to connect all Uverse TV nodes directly to the UVerse RG,  wired or wireless with a network dedicated to UVerse.

The tip is to dedicate a switch of at least 100mb Ethernet to all of the UVerse TV nodes.

What would connect to the RG is one cable to this switch and one cable to the WAN port on the base Google Wifi puck.

Connect other wired devices to a Gigabit Ethernet switch that uplinks to the second port on the base Google WiFi puck.  You can optionally wire other "slave" Google WiFi pucks to this same switch.

 

Enjoy!

--Mike

 

Contributor

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1 Message

6 months ago

I installed the 3 google pucks.  The wifi works fine.  But how do I point the uverse pace box to the google wifi?