J

New Member

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2 Messages

Wednesday, November 10th, 2021 5:53 PM

How to connect ATT BGW320-500 to TP-Link AX3000 Deco 60 Mesh Network

I was recently set up with ATT fiber optic 1000 service and the BGW320-500 gateway.  I was able to connect it to my TP-Link AX3000 mesh network (3 satellites/nodes) with no problems.  Speed checks around the house are good (in the 500-700 mbps range).  The tech who set up the ATT service and gateway said I could leave the gateway's wi-fi on as well as connect my mesh network.  I have done that, but it looks like I have two separate networks that way.  I assume that means I have "double NAT" - I'm not totally sure what that means, but my understanding is that can cause problems.  My thinking is that I would like to just use the BGW320 as my modem and convert my TP-Link mesh network to wireless access points. This would allow me to move the TP-Link unit that I'm currently using as my combination modem/node to another area of the house to improve my wi-fi coverage.  My understanding is that I would then essentially have 4 wireless access points including the one on the BGW-320.  Can I accomplish this by just changing my TP-Link system to WAP mode and then rename the BGW320 SSID and change its password to my desired name and password?  I don't use advanced functions like port forwarding (not even sure what that means).  Will my proposed set up work?  I don't want to jeopardize screwing up a setup that currently seems to be working well.  My goal is just to avoid having two networks and gain better wi-fi coverage in my home.

Thanks!

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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30.9K Messages

1 year ago

What you are describing, changing the TP-Link to be in access point mode, would give you a single network.  This configuration is fine.  The downside is that you're losing any router-based capabilities in the TP-Link, such as the ability to configure your own DNS and any other parental control or security features it might provide in router mode.

Double NAT refers to the configuration where you have a router connected to another router where both of them are doing NAT (network address translation) independently of each other, meaning two NAT table look ups, two source IP address header replacements, etc. for any traffic connected to the second router on the network.  There will be imperfect ability to communicate with nodes connected directly to the two different routers.

If you have two different Wi-Fi routers, then the two routers will be handling out their own different DHCP information, which can cause confusion if the two routers are given the same SSID.  This is in addition to the double-NAT issue for clients of one of the routers.

Another way to get rid of the double-NAT, is to turn on IP Passthrough in the Gateway to the TP-Link.  This causes the traffic to/from the TP-Link to not have to go through the full NAT treatment as it goes through the Gateway.  When you do this, we normally recommend that you turn off the Wi-Fi on the Gateway and just use your third party router for all your Internet processing.

New Member

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2 Messages

1 year ago

Thank you so much for your very prompt answer!  One follow up question… you mention that if I put my mesh network in AP mode that I will lose some of the controls and features I have in the TP-Link router. Wouldn’t I have the same types of controls with the router function in the BGW320?  

Thanks!

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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30.9K Messages

1 year ago

Wouldn’t I have the same types of controls with the router function in the BGW320?  

Not the ones I just mentioned.  AT&T does provide some Parental Control settings using the Smart Home Manager interface, but you cannot control the DNS settings (if you care about such things), nor could you do anything with QoS, etc.  


As I said, this is a fine configuration and is by far the simplest to set up.  There are other ACEs that greatly prefer this and strongly recommend it instead of the other (IP Passthrough).

ATTHelp

Community Support

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207.4K Messages

1 year ago

We are here to help you with your internet, jsingletary.

 

Thank you to the ace for the useful information.

 

We're happy to hear that the ace was able to help you, and gave you the best solution.

 

If you have any other questions or concerns, feel free to reach back out.

 

Thank you for choosing AT&T.

 

Marc, AT&T Community Specialist

New Member

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1 Message

1 year ago

Another way to get rid of the double-NAT, is to turn on IP Passthrough in the Gateway to the TP-Link.  This causes the traffic to/from the TP-Link to not have to go through the full NAT treatment as it goes through the Gateway.  When you do this, we normally recommend that you turn off the Wi-Fi on the Gateway and just use your third party router for all your Internet processing.

I am planning to setup a mesh as well.  One question, when Gateway is in IP passthrough mode, can you still connect other devices, such as a TV, to the ethernet ports of the Gateway?



ATTHelp

Community Support

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207.4K Messages

1 year ago

Hi, GoldenKnight10, we're happy to answer your question!

 

Once IP Passthrough is set up, you'll have to connect your other devices through the 3rd party router, not your AT&T gateway.

 

We hope that clears things up for you! Let us know if you have any other questions.

 

Aminah, AT&T Community Specialist

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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30.9K Messages

1 year ago

I am planning to setup a mesh as well.  One question, when Gateway is in IP passthrough mode, can you still connect other devices, such as a TV, to the ethernet ports of the Gateway?

You sure can.  Keep in mind that those devices connected to the Gateway will not be able to interact with devices connected to your router.  For example, if you had a NAS that offers a file service that your TV could access via DLNA, the TV would not be able to access the NAS if it were connected to the router.

Once IP Passthrough is set up, you'll have to connect your other devices through the 3rd party router, not your AT&T gateway.

You don't have to.  It normally makes the most sense to.  But cabling or whatever makes it infeasible to do so, and you can live with the restrictions as I mentioned, you can continue to connect devices to the Gateway's Ethernet ports.

New Member

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2 Messages

7 months ago

I am currently running my ATT BGW320 in passthough, using a TP Link X68 as router with a wired node meshed in the rear of the house. I also tried using the BGW320 as the router with both X68 units in node mode, and that also worked. My question is this: which method is better? My speeds seem about the same with either router; and as such, is there some way to compare specs on the two routers? 

tonydi

ACE - Guru

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9.5K Messages

7 months ago

Your answer is the same that JefferMC mentioned earlier.  The main difference between IP Passthrough vs Access Point mode is that when you're in AP you are blocking some of the more advanced features that the Deco system can do.

Here is a LINK that outlines which features don't work in AP.  Since it works fine either way that should make it easier to decide which is best for your needs. 

(edited)

New Member

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2 Messages

7 months ago

Thing is, after I posted this, I switched back to utilizing the 320 router as the base with the TPs as mesh nodes, and the performance sucked. As such, I again put the BGW in passthrough, switched one tower of the TP X68 back to main router mode, and it's all good. Hence, why my question was: which method is better; for at the end of the day we want fast, reliable connections and speed. I still find that in the middle of the house wireless wifi speeds are a bit low. As such, I may simply grab a TP AX11000 and set it as the main router, placing the two X68 towers around the house as mesh nodes.  

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