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grasfulls
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Teacher

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22 Messages

Sat, Aug 22, 2015 12:58 AM

Cannot move DVRS to 3rd party router

3801HGV, 5 available static IPS. Can they be moved to a 3rd party router? I installed an ASUS RT-AC68U to free up the static IPs, but the tv playing freezes every 30 seconds, change the channel, plays/freezes, etc.

grasfulls

Teacher

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22 Messages

6 y ago

I see way more detail in other posts..I will try to add some. Sadly, I am not very knowledgeable in all this.

 

I wanted a static IP for a lighting control system and to add some cameras, I heard static is best for this. The tech came and reconfigured my router, he was walked through it via a chat on his ipad, he told me he did not really know how to do it. Anyway, I went from a DHCP router with a large range (I have a lot of devices, so the range was great!). All of a sudden, I have 5 static IPS that may be assigned.

 

I jam to the store and get an ASUS router. I plug that into the 3801. When I went to the LAN status of the 3801, there was only one static IP left, the uverse stuff took 4 of them. So, I figured I would move the uverse stuff to the switch I attached to the router. They all worked EXCEPT, the TVs would freeze every 30 seconds. I would change the channel, they would play and then freeze. So, back onto the 3801 and I call tech support.

 

Somehow, over the internet, they changed the IP address of the wired to a public IP (to free up one static), it is the broadband ip address of the 3801 - 101.xxx.xxx.xxx versus the 172.xxx.xxx everything else has, but it works. Can I put them on the Asus and make them work?

 

I just saw in the router settings that whereas all other devices show as "not connected" or "connected Static IP", the hardwired DVR shows as DMZ device.. what is that?

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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26.5K Messages

6 y ago

 

Okay... you've ordered a static address block and you have your own router... great.  You can do what's called a cascaded router setup and assign that range of IP addresses (use the base address, the one before the first of the useable ones) to your router.  Then you can set up your cameras to have the public static IP addresses.

 

But you cannot connect your IPTV gear through your third-party router (unless you have a very good router that actually properly supports IGMPv3 properly and you have it configured properly). Unless you're very sure what you're doing, always connect your IPTV gear direcly to the Residential Gateway (RG).  Also, you're probably not going to want to connect anything else to the cascaded router, either... since it's in charge of the public static IP range.

 

If all you want is external access to your IP cameras, you probably didn't need the public static address block.  Likely you only needed to map non-standard ports to each camera using port mapping.  And turn the filters off for all those ports.

 

grasfulls

Teacher

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22 Messages

6 y ago

Aug 21, 2015 6:52:07 PM
 

ACE - Master

 

"But you cannot connect your IPTV gear through your third-party router (unless you have a very good router that actually properly supports IGMPv3 properly and you have it configured properly). Unless you're very sure what you're doing, always connect your IPTV gear direcly to the Residential Gateway (RG).  Also, you're probably not going to want to connect anything else to the cascaded router, either... since it's in charge of the public static IP range."

 

Thanks Jeffer. No I am not sure what I am doing. What would happen though if, given the 5 addresses I may make use of, I end up with more devices then that? Using 6 as an example, there should be a simple way I can make use of 6 uverse devices with 5 static IPs, when one dynamic IP was doing it before.  If I have to find a router that can accomplish what is necessary, that is ok. Do you know of one?

 

gare

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