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Tue, Mar 20, 2018 5:58 PM

Yahoo Terms & Conditions Change FAQs

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Why did I receive a pop-up or an email notification from Oath about the Oath Terms of Service?

AT&T and Yahoo (at the time) work together to provide email related services. Oath is updating its terms of service because in 2017, Yahoo was acquired by Verizon, which combined the Yahoo business with AOL and formed a new company, known as Oath. 

 

What do I need to do?

Review the updated Oath terms of service and decide whether you choose to accept. If you choose to accept their updated terms of service, your AT&T email will continue to work as it does now.  If you chose not to accept the terms of service, your AT&T email will continue to work as it does now, but in the future your service could be impacted.  We do not know when or how it may be impacted, but you can visit Oath’s FAQ page to learn more.  The full URL for the Oath FAQs is https://policies.oath.com/us/en/oath/privacy/guce/faq/index.html

 

Will my email address change?

No, your email address will not change.  You will still be able to utilize your email address as usual.

 

Will my email account maintain the same functionality?

Yes, you can still send and receive emails, as well as access all other mail-related features. You can keep using your existing email address to send and receive emails just as you do today.

 

Do I need to cancel or modify my AT&T email service? 

No, there is no need to cancel any AT&T email service. It remains active and functional.

 

Will this Terms of Service announcement from Oath affect my ability to sign in to att.net?

No, you’ll continue to be able to use your email address to sign in to att.net.

 

Is there an option for me to not accept the Oath Terms of Service?

Yes.  When you receive the pop-up entitled “New Privacy and Terms,” you have the option to not accept by clicking on “I’ll do this later.”  And when you receive the email notification from Oath, you have the option of not clicking the button called “Review and agree now,” closing the email and disregarding the message.

 

What happens if I choose not to accept the Oath Terms of Service?

If you chose not to accept the terms of service, your AT&T email will continue to work as it does now, but in the future your service could be impacted.

 

Is there a way for me to opt out of having Oath use my email data for targeted advertising?

Yes.  If users want to opt out of having their email data used by Oath for targeted advertising, they may do so.  Users can do this by hovering over the ‘gear’ symbol in the upper right corner of the mail user interface on a PC or Mac, clicking on ‘About our Ads’ and then clicking on ‘Manage interest-based advertising categories, or opt-out of all categories, from Oath’.  This will take the user to the Yahoo Ad Interest Manager page, where the user can select the Opt Out button.  The full URL for the Ad Interest Manager webpage is https://aim.yahoo.com/aim/us/en/optout/.

 

What if I have questions about the provisions of the Oath Terms of Service?

For more information please visit Oath’s FAQs.  The full URL for the Oath FAQs is https://policies.oath.com/us/en/oath/privacy/guce/faq/index.html

 

If I accept the Oath Terms of Service, must I do so on each device that I use?

No, if you choose to accept the Oath terms of service, you can do this via your desktop, mobile and/or tablet device; It only needs to be accepted once.

 

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1 Attachment

Responses

Contributor

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3 Messages

3 years ago

Not a good move!

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

How can one continue to use AT&T services without ever using Oath? It would appear that from the information provided that all users will eventually have to consent to the terms offered by Oath.  Users information is not used to help users only to help companies sell their

users information for profit.

 

 

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

When I click on the Review and Agree Now button from the email I received to accept the Oath terms and conditions it just goes to the Yahoo page. So how do you get to the Oath terms and conditions page to review and accept them? 

 

Contributor

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2 Messages

3 years ago

How is ATT current email privacy rules different from the new Oath rules?

 

  • We’ve updated how we collect and use data. We’ve updated some of the ways we collect and analyze user data in order to deliver services, content, and relevant advertising to you and protect against abuse. This includes:
    • Analyzing content and information (including emails, instant messages, posts, photos, attachments, and other communications) when you use our services. This allows us to deliver, personalize and develop relevant features, content, advertising and services
    • Linking your activity on third-party sites and apps with information we have about you
    • Providing anonymized and aggregated reports to other parties regarding user trends

 

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

I received the email regarding Yahoo and Oath I will be changing my internet provider in the future and the company I will be changing to (Fiber internet when it comes to my location). I will be keeping my att phone and direct tv. This internet change will not happen until fiber comes to my town. The fiber internet company I will be changing to has told me I will be able to keep my sbcglobal.net email address when I change to their provider. How do I answer the question regarding the email I received this morning to agree to Yahoo, Oath and Verizon terms. Please let me know what I should do. 

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

I'm unclear as to what has changed under the Oath TOS from earlier Yahoo practices. In a June 3, 2013 post, Will Simonds blogged on Online Privacy that:

Yahoo is forcing its email users to switch to a new version of Yahoo Mail, and although it’s certainly easier on the eyes, the biggest change is less obvious: the new policy lets Yahoo scan your emails and IMs to target you with ads and see if you’re violating any policies or laws. ...

That means accepting the revised Terms of Service (TOS) and and Privacy Policy, which means agreeing to let “Yahoo!’s automated systems scan and analyze all incoming and outgoing communications content sent and received from your account.”

Yahoo has automated systems that look at the words you type, the files you attach, the people you contact, your location, and more. These systems guess at who you are and what interests you, and then change the ads you see on Yahoo to whatever they think you’ll respond to. Google has been doing this with Gmail for a long time. ...

There’s another privacy issue, too: Yahoo doesn’t just scan the email of Yahoo Mail users, but also the email of anyone who corresponds with them. That’s right: even if you don’t use Yahoo Mail but you email someone who does, Yahoo can scan your communications. The new TOS puts the burden on Yahoo users to tell the people they’re communicating with about this scanning: “If you consent to this ATOS and communicate with non-Yahoo! users using the Services, you are responsible for notifying those users about this feature.”...

Keep in mind that Yahoo’s privacy issues don’t end with email scanning. Yahoo has a vast network of data selling partners and affiliates. When you use Yahoo services, you aren’t just sharing with Yahoo: you’re sharing with hundreds of third-party companies you’ve never heard of. And some of these partners are pretty sensitive. For example, Yahoo’s Privacy Policy notes that “Yahoo! advertisers include financial service providers (such as banks, insurance agents, stock brokers and mortgage lenders) and non-financial companies (such as stores, airlines, and software companies).”

 

Contributor

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2 Messages

3 years ago

Your message focuses on Oath's Terms of Service without any mention of the Privacy Policy. I was shocked to my socks to read this section under How We Collect and Use Data : 

 

This includes: analyzing content and information when you use our services (including emails, instant messages, posts, photos, attachments, and other communications), linking your activity on other sites and apps with information we have about you, and providing anonymized and/or aggregated reports to other parties regarding user trends. 

 

I take this to mean that if I attach a document containing confidential information to an email that I give up my right to privacy in order to use their platform to send my message. Let me give you an example: if I use my AT&T e-mail account to send my representative a spreadsheet with my passwords that information will be accessed by Yahoo for possible exploitation. Please tell me I'm misreading what it means when they say they can analyze the content of e-mail attachments. 

 

Thank you.

 

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

I went to read Verizon’s privacy policy, which interestingly enough SPECIFIED that IT DID NOT APPLY TO OATH so why in the heck did you bother to include it in the first place in your policy? Do you guys even read what you put out there? Anyways, when I returned to the page where I could accept the policy, it had disappeared and went straight to my email. What does that mean? Have I accepted? Have I not? I don’t know. 

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

As a long time AT&T user who “bundled”to receive savings which never materialized, I’m extremely disappointed in this turn of events.  If I had wanted to associate myself with Verizon, I would have done so long ago.  This is disturbing to say the least especially at a time when the mining and misuse of our personal data is in the forefront of everyone's concerns!  Count me as a very upset client.  I will be agreeing to terms only because a change of email address is even more distressing.

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

I have read the updated terms and conditions for yahoo and oath but do not see anywhere to select to agree or disagree. Must I also create an oath account to do this . I am confused.

Contributor

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2 Messages

3 years ago

I don't mind being subscribed but we travel some and I don't want 50 or 100 emails per day.

Teacher

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12 Messages

3 years ago

It's not my fault I have an @sbcglobal.net email address since 2008. Now I have to deal with this "AT&T/Yahoo/Verizon/Oath" terms.

Am I walking into a Facebook-type environment of personal information theft if I agree with the terms? What about future charges for "services"? Are emails such "services"? Exactly what are the "services" that will be pay-for-play services?

 

From now on, I will password protect Word or Excel file attachments.  

 

>diking77 Count me as a very upset client.  I will be agreeing to terms only because a change of email address is even more distressing.

 

I am afraid I'll be agreeing to terms as well. Is there a box I can check that says: "Agreeing under duress"?

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

Come on now. You want to analyze my emails?  I might as well post them to an open access site. I would ask if you top executives have agreed to this unholy intrusion on privacy but we all know they are likely exempt. 

Anonymous

New Member

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25.7K Messages

3 years ago

I received the email on accepting OATH, I clicked on "Review and agree now" and it opened the log in page, I logged in and it took me to Yahoo's home page. Nothing to review or agree on.

Contributor

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1 Message

3 years ago

If you have read Google's TOS and Privacy Policy, you will see they are using your email address for targeted advertising and to send to third parties along with any other info they can gather.  If you agree to that, what's the problem with OATH?  

 

I think the issue about 'future' 'impact' sure needs to be spelled out better, so we can decide whether to accept getting screwed now or later.  

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