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BobNvl
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Teacher

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15 Messages

Mon, Apr 11, 2022 8:00 PM

Questions regarding relocating ONT

First – I've been in Data Processing full time since 1973. I know, it is now known as Information Technology but old habits die hard and it was Data Processing when I started and I prefer that to any of the ones that have come down the pike, such a IMS, MIS, EDP, etc. Among other things, I've made up and run countless yards of coaxial cable, telephone cable, Cat6, and other cables. I have, however, never worked with fiber optic cable.

My reason for writing is to ask questions about ATT Fiber Optic Internet installation.

Question: From everything I've read, I expect the ONT to be at BGW320. Is that correct? We are talking bout an instillation done some time after 04/15/2022.

The issue is relocating the ONT at a latter date. I want to eventually install it in my backroom office which is currently gutted to the outside sheathing. I will be at least three months before I get it finished to the point where I can put the ONT in there and I need to get the Fiber Optic install requested by 4/15/2022 (ATT deadline for free install).

I'm looking at two possible ways to relocate the ONT.

  1. See if the installer will leave about 40 extra feet of cable at the ONT. I could then relocate the ONT and re-plug the cable.

  2. Get a coupler/adapter and have the installer plug in the incoming cable into it and then plug a short piece of cable between the adapter/coupler and the ONT. I can then run a cable to the new location, when ready to replicate the ONT, unplug the short cable from the adapter/coupler and ONT and plug in the new, longer cable to the adapter/coupler and ONT. I would use a per-made cable for the long run, I don't want to mess with putting connectors on bulk cable.

I've read many questions and answers on the ATT forums, and elsewhere, and the main issue people raise when relocating the ONT is the possibility of damaging the connector on the end of the cable when unplugging and re-plugging it.

QUESTIONS regarding method #1 of relocating ONT – have installer leave 40 feet of extra cable at ONT:

  1. Would the installer be willing to leave at least 40 feet of extra incoming cable?
  2. Just how fragile is the connector at the end of the fiber optic cable?

  3. If you use care, can you unplug and re-plug a cable without damage to the connector? Are there any “tricks” to observer when doing so?

  4. Do you think the installer would be willing to leave an extra 40 feet of cable?

QUESTIONS regarding method #2 – use an adapter between incoming cable and ONT

  1. As regards method #2, what type of adapter would I get to go between the incoming cable and the short cable t the ONT?

  2. Does ATT use any type of special or proprietary connectors on the incoming cable that I'd have to account for?

  3. Would this Cable from Amazon be usable to connect the adapter/coupler and the ONT?

  4. Would this Coupler from Amazon be correct to couple the incoming cable to a long extension cable? I know that the item is multiple couplers but I've not seen what appears to be a compatible coupler sold individually with free or reasonable shipping. One example was $1.42 for the coupler and $19.09 for shipping.

  5. OR - would this Cable and Coupler bundle on Amazon be suitable for extending the ATT incoming cable?

Other QUESTIONS:

The BGW320 has only four CAT6 connectors, is there a way to add more so that I can run more than four cables to various locations in the house?

Can I use the ONT jack on the BGW320 to connect my existing ATT DSL MODEM/Router and use the CAT6 jacks on the DSL MODEM/Router instead of those on the BGW320? The BGW320 has an Ethernet jack labeled ONT and the DSL MODEM/Router has one labeled Optical Fiber Internet in addition to the DSL Broadband RJ?? (not sure if it is an RJ11, 14, or what but it is where you connect the DSL incoming cable).

Can I plug in a CAT6 cable to the ONT jack on the BGW320, run that cable to the Optic Fiber Internet jack on the DSL MODEM/Router, and use the jacks on the DSL MODEM/Router for devices around the house? If so, is there anything I need to configure differently than for a normal installation of just the BWG320?

Using the DSL MODEM/Router would allow me to have the BGW320 installed inside at the cable entrance location, put the DSL MODEM/Router wherever I what it and then run a CAT6 cable between the two. I'd not have to mess with the fiber optic cable. If I did this, where would the wireless transceiver by – in the BGW320 or the DSL MODEM/Router?

Any assistance you can provide will be greatly appreciated.

browndk26

ACE - Professor

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4.6K Messages

3分前

The bgw320 had a built in ONT. ATT prefers/requires  to run fiber direct to the 320. I would just have the installer place the gateway in the room you want the gateway in. You cannot connect an Ethernet cable to the red ONT port and get a signal out. It’s an inbound connection only. You can connect a network switch to one of the Ethernet ports of the gateway to get more wired connections. 

As far as I know, the new fiber installation is no charge. If you wanted to move the gateway later, that would be a billable charge. @my thoughts may provide more detailed install and tech info in a reply. 

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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28.7K Messages

2分前

The installer will need to complete the install to a finished room.  While he probably will leave some slack cable, 40' or more is asking a bit much.  The indoor fiber is more fragile than the drop, but is reasonably sturdy.  The two main issues with running fiber are (1) It is quite sensitive to bends below a certain radius and (2) the connectors.

One option you could have is to let him complete the install to a wall plate with the BGW320 there, then purchase a length of fiber from Amazon and run the fiber from the wall plate to the new BGW320 location once the new location is ready.  

To be honest, trying to get the installation completed to avoid an install fee and then move the BGW320 later sounds like a case of being pennywise and pound foolish.

BobNvl

Teacher

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15 Messages

2分前

JefferMC:

1 - what do you consider a "finished room"?

2 -what do you mean by "wall plate"?

3 - in your phrase "...install to a wall plate with the BGW320 there..." what do you mean by "there"? Where would the wall plate be and where would the ONT be?

4 - I'm assuming the "wall plate" is a fixture, mounted in a wall, into which the incoming cable attaches and then has jacks for fiber on the other side - like an electrical outlet box but with fiber optical, of course.

That sounds a lot like a coupler, albeit mounted in  a wall. Why couldn't the installer install a coupler, which I will provide, to the incoming cable and then a short cable - provided by me, to the coupler and then to the ONT?

How about if I make a little "wall" on the shelf I plan to install at the entry point and have the installer run the incoming cable to a wall plate in the "wall" and then a cable to the ONT? The "wall" would be framed and sheathed just as a structure wall, just much smaller.

Remember the target room is undergoing a major remodel and won't have dry wall in place, or new electrical outlets, for at least three months - I'll going to be in and out of town quite often through July.

Can't the installer install the ONT in the basement right where the cable would enter from outside? Then I take care of installing a longer cable to the final destination?

As to "penny wise and pound foolish" - if necessary, I will wait until the room is finished and pay for the installation but that will greatly delay our switching to fiber.

There is a basic issue here concerning the ability of my moving things within the house - everything currently in the house - water, electrical, telephone/DSL, thermostat to furnace, door bell, etc. can be extended or relocated by me.

What if I want to move the ONT to another location, down the road, must I, absolutely, have ATT do it and pay them for what I consider (with my background and experience - 49+ years in all things "computer") a relatively run of the mill action.

I might want to relocate the ONT to a more advantage location as regards the strength of wireless signal throughout the house. Do I have ATT come out, pay for it, and try different locations for the ONT?

If fiber is so fragile that it is dangerous to unplug and re-plug a connector, it seems to me that the technology is far from mature to be in actual production use.

As to bends in a cable, I never run any sort of cable such that it requires a low radius bend - it might be more important with fiber, but any type of cable can be damaged if "kinked."

On a scale of 0 to 10, 0 being no risk and 10 being fatal risk, what is the risk level in unplugging the fiber connector to the ONT and plugging it into a coupler and then into plugging a new cable to the ONT?

Again, if fiber is so fragile that unplugging a cable and plugging in a new cable is a very high risk operation, fiber optical cable is far from robust enough for wide use.

Exactly what is your concern with using a coupler on the incoming cable to a longer cable?

Again - I intended to have the ONT installed in the basement, near the outside wall, and then relocate it later to a room upstairs. Do you consider a basement a "non finished room" or were you referring to an outside installation (which I know is not done) or in a garage or other outbuilding?

Once again, if fiber optic connectors are so fragile that it is a real danger to unplug them and replug them elsewhere, fiber optic should not be used in a residential setting.

I can't believe it is that fragile.

If you haven't grasped the idea - I will take full responsible for this relocation and if I screw things up I'll call ATT and pay to have them correct it.

One last thing - I fully understand that the majority of the population has trouble doing something like running ordinary telephone wire to another room - I don't.

An sample of something they said could not be done - years ago we needed to connect two leased lines to one MODEM and I was told, by SWB,  it would not work without a bridge to balance the strength of each line. Such a bridge was almost the same cost as another MODEM and the issue wasn't the cost of another MODEM. It was the cost of another adapter in our IBM 3705 Communication Controller attached to the computer (a mainframe to most people today.

I researched the requirements, worked out the circuit, and made one myself with an OP AMP and other components. It worked perfectly. Cost me perhaps $50 in components. I even made a PC (Printed Circuit) board for the finished product.

I'm capable of following the needed precautions when working with cable and connectors and other hardware.

If you are wondering - after my first three years in Data Processing, I have always held the Systems Programmer position, the top technical position in the shops. And I'm not just a "main-framer" - I regularly use at least six PC programming languages, including Assembler.

Name it and I have probably done it.

I can follow instructions, procedures, and policies, and I take responsible for my mistakes.

Really, if fiber so fragile that only ATT and "mess" with it in the house - I strongly recommend that the industry start a full scale, high priority project to make fiber more resilient.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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28.7K Messages

2分前

Wow.  You wrote a lot and I don't have the time to read it and give you the full answer.  I'll quickly address your first 5 points.  @my thoughts could give you much better answers if he sees your post.

1 - what do you consider a "finished room"?

A room that will satisfy the environmental conditions on the BGW320.  Temperature, humidity, poser.

2 -what do you mean by "wall plate"?

I mean an AT&T Fiber jack, which (as you say later) is a coupler mounted in a wall fixture.

3 - in your phrase "...install to a wall plate with the BGW320 there..." what do you mean by "there"? Where would the wall plate be and where would the ONT be?

If you get a BGW320, you won't get a separate ONT.  The ONT will be inside the BGW320.  And "there" is wherever you and the installer agree that the fiber can terminated (which is within 10 feet [I think] of where the BGW320 needs to be).

4 - I'm assuming the "wall plate" is a fixture, mounted in a wall, into which the incoming cable attaches and then has jacks for fiber on the other side - like an electrical outlet box but with fiber optical, of course.

Yep.

That sounds a lot like a coupler, albeit mounted in  a wall. Why couldn't the installer install a coupler, which I will provide, to the incoming cable and then a short cable - provided by me, to the coupler and then to the ONT?

Because AT&T wants to make sure the connection is robust and correct, they will want to provide the coupler.

BobNvl

Teacher

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15 Messages

2分前

JefferMC

I "write a lot" because we are dealing with a technical subject and I want to be detailed as possible to get answers which actually address my questions. Far too many people give a short question with few useful details and people have to ask them to provide more details.

You just said:

"Because AT&T wants to make sure the connection is robust and correct, they will want to provide the coupler."

Okay - so, I set up a location with power and room for everything at the site were the incoming cable enters the house - the basement, which is temperature and humility controlled.

From the PDF at https://www.dslreports.com/r0/download/2459518~f2936bb2533bad3ac13f33566dc44e29/7368_isam_ont_bgw320505.pdf  named: "Nokia-7368 Intelligent Services Access Manager ONT7368 ISAM ONT BGW320-505 Product Guide" on Page 30:

"Temperature range and humidity; 32°F to 107°F (0°C to +41.7°C) ambient temperature5% to 95% relative humidity, non-condensing at 40°C"

Additionally, from the PDF at https://fcc.report/FCC-ID/O6ZBGW320/4522478.pdf named "BGW320-500 XGS-PON Broadband GatewayRelease 1.0" on section 5.3 on page 25:

"5-3. Environment  Operating temperature: 0°C to 41.7°C (32°F to 107°F); 8% to 95% (Non Condensing) Relative Humidity"

There are two places in the house where those conditions do not occur - the detached garage and the attic.

Everywhere else, including the basement, are well withing those specifications.

So, our basement IS a "finish room" based upon what you said.

Okay, I provide a place where the ONT and power supply can sit, with an electrical supply, and a piece of wood, against the exterior concrete block wall, and ATT can pull the cable into the  house, run it to a wall box (which they provide) mounted on the piece of wood, run a cable (which they provide or I'll provide, doesn't matter to me) from the wall box to the ONT, test things, and they are finished.

Correct?

If that is correct, it in essence describes my option number 2 in my original post/question:

"Get a coupler/adapter and have the installer plug in the incoming cable into it and then plug a short piece of cable between the adapter/coupler and the ONT. I can then run a cable to the new location, when ready to replicate the ONT, unplug the short cable from the adapter/coupler and ONT and plug in the new, longer cable to the adapter/coupler and ONT. I would use a per-made cable for the long run, I don't want to mess with putting connectors on bulk cable."

If that is not correct, please elucidate.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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28.7K Messages

2分前

I think you missed the part where I said that the BGW 320 has an internal ONT and you will not get a separate ONT if you get a BGW320 and the fiber would have to run directly to the BGW320.

browndk26

ACE - Professor

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4.6K Messages

2分前

Just request that an ONT be installed in the basement. Then run Ethernet later to the new gateway location. The only real advantage to the bgw320 is it has ax Wi-Fi. You sound like the type of person who would have your own router behind the gateway and wouldn’t use the gateway Wi-Fi. The fiber connector from the wall plate to the ONT is considered fragile. No outer cover so it’s flexible. I think att just encourages customers to not unplug it. If a customer unplugs and plugs it in repeatedly it could be damaged. 

BobNvl

Teacher

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15 Messages

2分前

JefferMC,

No, I never said I thought the BGW200 was a stand-alone ONT, I just referred to the BGW200 as the ONT occasionally in my messages and I understand that the cable would have to go to the BGW200.

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