Shop Now, Avoid Delays - Get Our Best Holiday Deals!
Get superfast AT&T Fiber internet
ignitus's profile

Contributor

 • 

3 Messages

Thu, Jan 7, 2016 8:01 PM

Gigapower - Possibility of Multiple Breakouts

Is it possible to have multiple hardlines back to your Gigapower install or is the only option the one jack which has the provided access point.  I actually would not be against setting up two access points.  My home is two stories and it currrently is not wired with Cat5e/6.  I would like to have direct ethernet acess back  both upstairs and downstars.  This is to avoid splitting my bandwidth across 5GHz 802.11N which is far slower then the provided promise of 1Gbs symetric. 

 

I'm told that the service comes in over the existing twisted pairs to your phone lines.  I believe these are only 2 pairs instead of the needed 4 pairs for ethernet, but my past experince with Municiple Ethernet had Ethernet with IPv6 enter directly in to the home, so I was hopping that the wireless acess provided was simply a break out box and hte actual modem from the fiber was on the outside of the house.   I called tech support on this and I believe they gave me confirmation this was possible, but when I think about the answer given I believe we might have miss communicated and started a conversation about VOIP.

 

I was told to ask sales to make sure all of my connections "Ring" and then I would be able to "Hook my Computer directly to the phone Jack" .  The person did use the word computer and not phone, so I am not sure.  I was going to order service next week and just wanted some clarification before I did.

 

All feedback is welcome

Thanks

 

 

 

mibrnsurg

Expert

 • 

20.4K Messages

6 y ago

@ignitus  Everything has to go thru the inside Residential Gateway b4 going anywhere else.  Uverse's IPv6 can cause rebooting, disconnects and browsing problems and we tell users to disable it in the RG Gui.

 

Can add an ac router behind the RG to give faster/better wireless coverage, or connect on ethernet from the RG using gigabit switches.  If you're getting TV, keep data and IPTV on separate circuits.  Good luck on your install and come back. 😉

 

Chris
__________________________________________________________

Please NO SD stretch-o-vision or 480 SD HD Channels
Need Help? PM ATT Uverse Care (all service problems)
ATT Customer Care(billing and all other problems)
Your Results May Vary, In My Humble Opinion
I Call It Like I See It, Simply a U-verse user, nothing more

Contributor

 • 

3 Messages

6 y ago

I've seen the discussions about the IPTV Multicast issues.  The problem makes sense and I'm guessing to solve bandwidth issues related to clasical Unicast based streaming.   But, it does make me wonder if everything needs to run through the gateway. How do you normall handle running lines to each TV in the house?

Contributor

 • 

3 Messages

6 y ago

Alright, after looking at http://www.dslreports.com and reviewing several images from of the ONT. I think I have a better idea of what to expect.   I am left assuming that if you sign up for IPTV then the installation must cover running a few CAT6 Drops to each of the locations, but if you exceed the port limit of the RG then you need additional swtiches capable of IGMP v3 or you need to keep the TVs on a seperate cercuit from the Unicast equipment.

 

I'll have to think on this for a bit.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

 • 

25.6K Messages

6 y ago


@ignitus wrote:

...I am left assuming that if you sign up for IPTV then the installation must cover running a few CAT6 Drops to each of the locations, but if you exceed the port limit of the RG then you need additional swtiches capable of IGMP v3 or you need to keep the TVs on a seperate cercuit from the Unicast equipment.

 

I'll have to think on this for a bit.


Whether Gigapower (ONT) or VDSL2 (Copper/NID), they will run Cat5e from the outside of the home to where your Gateway device is, that is included in the installation.  They won't fish it through walls, etc., so you might want to run it yourself and let them terminate it.

 

They will run Cat5e cable to where your DVR is located (again, no fishing).  They will normally prefer to use Wireless Receivers for the next two TV's.  After that, they may make up to two more Cat5e runs at no additional charge (but still not going to fish), but might opt to use pre-existing coax if available and of sufficient quality for HPNA based signal distribution to additional receivers.  (Not sure about using Coax, this used to be standard practice before wireless receivers and requiring the dedicated Cat5e run to the Gateway).

 

Your switches do not normally need to be Layer-3-peeking/IGMPv3 capable unless you want to connect a U-verse IPTV device to the same switch that is also serving a Wireless Access Point or Router (i.e. other than the Gateway) or some other network device that can't handle the multicast traffic well.  Good quality Gigabit switches (such as the Netgear GS105 or GS108) work fine without IGMPv3 support.  If needed to connect your TV Receivers, AT&T can normally provide a GS105.

 

 

Need help?
New to the AT&T Community? Start by visiting the Community How-To.
New to the AT&T Community?
Visit the Community How-To.