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New Member

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1 Message

Tuesday, August 4th, 2020 4:47 PM

Using my own modem and router with AT&T Fiber? (August 2020)

All of the information currently available online says that AT&T does not allow customers to use their own equipment with Fiber. However, when I just called to schedule service installation, I was told that that WAS allowed now, and would knock $10/mo off the price of the service. I wanted to 1) make sure that this is correct, that I now can use my own modem and router, and 2) I wanted to know if there's any way to find out what modems and routers are currently compatible with/allowed with the service. Can I just go off of a list of Uverse compatible equipment or what?

Scholar

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3.7K Messages

3 years ago

@MRbor 

I purchased my own router online and asked the installation guy to hook mine up instead of his. Mine was exactly like his and worked right away. I am still getting a charge for the equipment on my bill. I have called and had this escalated but was told to mail a letter to the president. The service reps would tell me I was correct about the new law, but that they didn’t have the option to remove the charge. Should I file a complaint with the FCC? Or am I missing something here? 

The law you are relying on does no apply to AT&T and you are wasting your time with the FCC complaint  but Cable TV operators changing customers for the use of their own equipment AT&T is not a Multiple System Operator and not covered by the FCC rules to effect in Dec. 19, 2020

https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/5035/text#H9D3FC644679E4CEFB927457B4310C9D3

Dave

New Member

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1 Message

3 years ago

@kreik  

(4 months behind), but if you are still having the issue, you must call AT&T and have them allow the third party router access the AT&T gateway. I literally had to do it today. They paired the (new third party) router MAC address with the AT&T modem/router combo in the “background (by accessing the gateway)”. I then went on a PC and connected to my third party Router (Mesh) site/homepage. It adjusted the IP address to be compatible with the modem and I was able to set the network name and password to the same as the original AT&T setup. All my (52) devices connected right away and waaaay better speeds, no dead spots, and working seamlessly. I have a 4200sqft. home and while on a cell phone at one of the furthers points from either mesh router (main & (1) satellite), I’m getting the attached speeds. 

*Disclaimer: I am in no way shape or form a terminology or nomenclature expert in this field. Only relaying what I either was told happened (background) and what I physically did and saw. Additionally, I was also told by one of the AT&T reps; IOT use the third party router, they had to “disable” the AT&T router in the modem/router combo I have. Buuuut….. 20 min later talking to a different AT&T rep, I was told: that was not true and there is no way to disable it… Either way….. after 4 hours on with AT&T and Orbi tech reps, mission accomplished. And yes, still paying the $10/mon. 

(edited)

ACE - Professor

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5.8K Messages

3 years ago

You don’t have to call att to set up a third party router. Any customer can do it themselves. I hope you didn’t pay for att to do it for you. 

Contributor

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4 Messages

2 years ago

Fyi, everyone referencing HR 5035 is wrong for one simple reason: HR 5035 was passed by the house but no one else. It was not signed into law by the president. Instead, HR 1865 was signed into law and became codified into law as Public Law No. 116-94 and today is part of 47 USC 562. That thing is huge, but does include the same provisions that requires any provider of broadband to not charge a customer for equipment they were never given or that they returned to AT&T:

(c) Consumer rights to accurate equipment charges

A provider of a covered service or fixed broadband internet access service may not charge a consumer for—

(1) using covered equipment provided by the consumer; or

(2) renting, leasing, or otherwise providing to the consumer covered equipment if—

( A) the provider has not provided the equipment to the consumer; or
( B) the consumer has returned the equipment to the provider, except to the extent that the charge relates to the period beginning on the date when the provider provided the equipment to the consumer and ending on the date when the consumer returned the equipment to the provider.

Regarding the claim that this law does not apply to AT&T, here is where the law limits what it applies to:

(d) Definitions

In this section:

(1) Broadband internet access service

The term broadband internet access service has the meaning given such term in section 8.1(b) of title 47, Code of Federal Regulations, or any successor regulation.

(2) Covered equipment

The term covered equipment means equipment (such as a router) employed on the premises of a person (other than a provider of a covered service or fixed broadband internet access service) to provide a covered service or to provide fixed broadband internet access service.

(3) Covered service

The term covered service means service provided by a multichannel video programming distributer, to the extent such distributor is acting as a multichannel video programming distributor.

First, this applies to "broadband internet access service" which per the code of federal regulations means any Internet that is not dial-up Internet (see B). Second, "covered equipment" includes something such as a router that is physically on the premises of the person receiving the service.

Last, "covered service" means service provided by a "multichannel video programming distributor", which is further defined by 47 USC 522 as a person "who makes available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple channels of video programming". The full text is the following, which made AT&T an MVPD because they offered direct broadcast satellite service through their subsidiary DirecTV until it became a separate company on August 2, 2021:

(13) the term "multichannel video programming distributor" means a person such as, but not limited to, a cable operator, a multichannel multipoint distribution service, a direct broadcast satellite service, or a television receive-only satellite program distributor, who makes available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple channels of video programming;

However, read the first quote and note the "Consumer rights to accurate equipment charges" sub-section (c) applies to either "provider of a covered service or fixed broadband internet access service". So even if an Internet provider is not an MVPD, while sub-sections (a) and (b) would not apply, sub-section (c) regarding equipment charges does apply. In short, the accurate equipment charges law applies to both video and internet providers.

Scholar

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3.7K Messages

2 years ago

OK have fun but it still does not apply to AT&T Fiber service.

Dave

ACE - Expert

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34.4K Messages

2 years ago

So... um... this means that AT&T cannot charge you for equipment you own.

I see nowhere in what you wrote (or the entire text of the article) that says that the provider must make available equipment for sale (AT&T doesn't).  AT&T provides the equipment necessary for the service and charges an equipment fee for the equipment it provides.

There were earlier laws/regulations that require certain Internet providers to use equipment that could be obtained elsewhere.  Those would apply to tarriffed-DSL and/or CATV, but don't apply to converged services such as AT&T Fiber Internet.

ACE - Expert

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27.5K Messages

2 years ago

@someoneidk   Thanks for the analysis.  Where did you go to law school?

ACE - Expert

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23.8K Messages

2 years ago

Another poster who reads into it what he wants to but understands even less.

Contributor

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4 Messages

2 years ago

You don't need a degree in law to read law lol, it's provided for anyone to read by design. Anyways, I was considering switching to AT&T but with the additional equipment fee for nonstandard stuff they do, they are no longer the cheapest option and thus they've lost a potential customer.

ACE - Expert

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27.5K Messages

2 years ago

AT&T has a whole room full of lawyers to write up the Terms of Service.  AFAIK, no one has successfully challenged those TOS.  It's called CYA.

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