Get superfast AT&T Fiber internet
ATTU-verseCare's profile
Community Support

Community Support

 • 

6.7K Messages

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016 8:42 PM

Troubleshooting Slow AT&T Fiber - Solutions from the AT&T Community

Learn What You Need For AT&T Fiber Speed

 

First, AT&T Fiber requires the right hardware. If your device(s) is not compatible with gigabit speeds, you may not be able to take advantage of the plan/ speed you are subscribed to. Check out what you need below!

Before troubleshooting, you'll want to check the speeds through the modem. This will help determine if you are getting fiber speeds from the outside fiber cable and isolate the issue, either with your equipment or the AT&T network. 

 

The right hardware

  •  A network card that can support the plan – some cards are not designed to go above 100 Mbps. Check the owners manual to see if your device can support gigabit speeds. Fast Ethernet supports up to 100Mbps, Gigabit Ethernet supports 1000mbps.
  • Network cables compatible with gigabit speeds – Cat-5e can be used 100Mbps speeds,  Cat-6 cables are recommended for gigabit speeds. 
  • Updated operating systems – the older the OS, the less likely it will support higher speeds. For example, if drivers are not updated, this may prevent full utilization
  • Updated network device – switches and hubs are rated for certain speeds. Make sure yours is rated to handle gigabit speeds

 

What impacts your speed

  •  Malware – viruses and other programs can run in the background and impact speeds. We recommend downloading our security suite here.
  • Other programs using the network – like malware, some programs can run in the background and use up resources. Close all programs before testing.
  • The type of USB port you use – if you are using a network adapter that uses USB, make sure the adapter is capable of gigabit speeds. USB 2.0 maxes out between 250-300 Mbps. 3.0 USB ports support 900 Mbps or higher.
  • An old CPU - a weaker processor is not capable of handling higher speeds.

 

Remember, the older the equipment is, the less likely it is going to be compatible with gigabit speeds. We recommend updating the equipment if you determine the hardware is not compatible. If you have 1G plan, testing near or around 600 mbps is within the parameters of the plan.

 

If the above does not help and you meet the hardware requirements, troubleshoot using our Troubleshoot & Resolve Tool via a browser or mobile device! It beats calling in! 

Other Helpful Links

 

ChrisZ, AT&T Community Specialist 

*I am an AT&T employee, and the postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent AT&T's position, strategies or opinions.

Still need help? Ask a question! Our 1.4 million members typically respond within 1 hour.

1 Attachment

Jezza819

Tutor

 • 

9 Messages

5 years ago

Can't. My apartment complex made a deal with AT&T to wire all of our units so we're stuck with them.

Tutor

 • 

6 Messages

5 years ago

@Kheinold  I had ATT out yesterday to hook up their Gig1000 product.   Coming from Comcast in CA where my speeds were maxing 225 downstream I also was stoked to try out the promise of Gig speeds.   I was at work when the installer came and completed the work.   When I got home,  I loaded wifi first to see what kind of speed I was going to get - 57 MPs downstream and 90 upstream. - I don't get it?    I didn't troubleshoot or plug-in via ethernet yet but are you kidding me?    I was living off my tmobile hotspot for a week until these guys came out.   My smart tv connected to the ATT modem/wifi router noted they speeds were not ideal.     Thanks, Captain Obvious.     I'll dig in this weekend.   Fingers crossed.

 

Note:   I did a query on the ATT site and they recommended to turn off IPV6 and a few other highly technical toggles none of which a normal user would be able to do.    So much for the OOBE.

Contributor

 • 

2 Messages

5 years ago

I have the 1000 mbps servicd.

I'm running an ASUS ROG with 10/100/1000 and Cat6 wired to the AT&T router. 

I had a tech come out today. He was condescending and plain rude. First he told me that my speed of 260 mbps is the best I'll get. Then he said he's never seen speeds over 300 mbps. I told him "yes on Wi-Fi that is correct" I showed him my PC. Then he argued about my cable telling me there is no such thing as Cat 6. He said unless I was using a Super Computer I wouldn't see anything more than 300 mbps wired. 

A little back and forth the he hit me with "How much are you paying for your service?" He said that I'm paying for 100 mbps and that the 1000 mbps is an introductory offer. Implying that I'm lucky to be getting what I am. The entire interaction was hostile and aggressive. Thanks AT&T for ruining my day!

timbuk2okc

Scholar

 • 

403 Messages

5 years ago

Paying $80 and getting a pretty constant 926 Mbps, but don't know where you are, may make a difference.

Tutor

 • 

5 Messages

5 years ago

AT&T seriously needs to hire people who know what they're doing. My connection was great, around 800Mbps up/down for the first few months. It has slowly degraded over time, and is now sitting at 50Mbps down and a range of 300-700 up. A tech came out and, after being here 2 hours, blamed it on my PC. He stated that my CPU was too slow because the PC Toolbox said it was. Spoiler alert, it's a 3.6GHz CPU, and is running at 3.6 per my BIOS and CPU-Z and task manager, but the PC Toolbox says it's at 2.0 (bullsh*t). Also, SIX other hardwired devices all pull the EXACT same speeds.

He also used the gateway's internal speed test, which showed 900+ coming into the modem for both up/down. However, I talked to my friend, who now works for Google Fiber here in Atlanta and used to work for AT&T, and he confirmed with me that those internal speed tests on the gateway are 100% rigged, so AT&T can take less blame. So, there's that, too.

My symptoms fall pretty close in line with a poorly installed fiber line. The fiber tips/connectors in the ONT are most likely dirty, and were most likely not properly secured. A tech is coming tomorrow to re-install everything, but if that does not solve the problem, I'll be taking my business back to Comcast. Slower speeds, but at least it was consistent.

Gpz1100

Scholar

 • 

91 Messages

5 years ago

I would not allow a tech to install any software on any of my pc's.  Have him demonstrate good speeds on his own laptop. 

 

The ideal test is a fresh windows install on a capable pc (reasonably modern cpu, decent amount of ram, gigabit port, etc) connected directly to the gateway using ethernet.  No other wired or wireless devices connected.  If you're still having issues then it could be the gateway itself or possibly too many people on the network or some other network issue on att's side.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

 • 

30.9K Messages

5 years ago

Gpz1000 makes a good point, especially "connected directly to the gateway using ethernet."  Is that what you tried @joshmutiny?  Or is it wireless performance that has fallen off?

Tutor

 • 

5 Messages

5 years ago

Unfortunately, he did it without asking, which was also annoying. It was an ATT tool, so I wasn’t too upset, but it didn’t make me happy.

 

Also, yeah, I’m directly hard wired using brand new cat 7 cables.

Tutor

 • 

5 Messages

5 years ago

joshmutiny,

Thanks for your report. That was my experience exactly! It seems that the
ATT techs are trained to blame it on your computer, NEVER their service.
I'm in San Antonio, Tx. and patiently waiting for Google Fiber to service
my neighborhood.

Contributor

 • 

3 Messages

5 years ago

same boat. download when installed aroung the 400s, now 150 to 200. upload still fast at 800s wired. can't be the laptop hardware if uploads are that fast. what gives?

Not finding what you're looking for?
New to AT&T Community?
New to the AT&T Community? Start by visiting the Community How-To.
New to the AT&T Community?
Visit the Community How-To.