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FrogFan
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10th stratosphere!

Teacher

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41 Messages

Mon, Oct 30, 2017 3:11 PM

Periodic reboot required to connect Windows 7 to 5G

I have a Pace 5268AC router running software version 10.5.3.527171-att.  It was installed in July.  Since installation, I've had trouble connecting at 5G on my Windows 7 laptop. 

 

In the meantime, my Android phone has always connected at 5G and maintains that connection indefinitely.  Because of that, I've always thought the problem was with my computer, not the Pace.  So, I've tried all the Windows tricks, removed and re-added connections, etc.  I bought a new USB adapter, and, on initial installation, it worked will for awhile, then it wouldn't connect at 5G, either. 

 

I finally decided to restart my router and return it to factory settings to see if that would help.  That was painful, since that process required that I go back and re-enter my passwords, etc., but it worked.  The laptop connected at 5G and maintained the ability to connect for several weeks.  Yesterday, it refused to connect at 5G, so I rebooted it (without returning to factory settings) this morning.  That did the trick.  The laptop now connects at 5G.  Rebooting is better than restarting, but is still a pain.

 

Has anyone else seen this problem?  Any fixes short of periodically rebooting the Pace?

 

Thanks for any help.

 

ATTHelp

Community Support

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200.7K Messages

Il y a 5 y

Sorry to hear of the trouble you are having with WiFi connection. We will be glad to help. To assist further, we need to gather more information. Click here to send us a private message, please include your account number and the phone number that is on the account.



-BrandonP, AT&T Community Specialist

FrogFan

Teacher

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41 Messages

Il y a 5 y

Thank you Brandon.  I sent a private message as you requested.

jleblancuv

Teacher

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11 Messages

Il y a 5 y

This will continue to happen as the Pace Routers supplied by AT&T are crippled by AT&T by design. The internal buffers of the devices are set in firmware to such a low level that any reasonable load of traffic, both wired and wireless, will cause the modem to drop the DSL connection (Fiber is just DSL over fiber optics) to whatever host it talks to and causes a reconnection. This may take up to 1 - 5 minutes and happens for hours on end.

 

You can try escalating the tech support by calling, AT&T Office of the President at ***, they will open a ticket with people who will actually try to solve the problem and not just read from a script.

 

I have fought the same issues since July and even with the top level tech support they ended up admitting that the only way to solve the issue is for AT&T to remove the clamps on the internal buffers of the modem. This is done to throttle traffic and most users that occasionally surf and email won't notice. However if you are a heavy user of bandwidth, 3 Netflix Sessions, XBox traffic, PS4 traffic, streaming traffic, you will quickly hit the point at which the modem cannot cope with the load and will continually reset the DSL connection until you use less bandwidth. This is done by AT&T because their infrastructure cannot handle the loads being put on it. Classic case of AT&T selling services their network is not capable of providing at advertised speeds, so "throttling" is used until the infrastructure catches up. Basically if you have Gigabit fiber, you are getting maybe 100M on average. Yes the speed test will show 800+M up and down, but remember this is a very short test and only one computer.

 

I only use my modem as a pass through modem, no routing, no firewall, no wireless, nothing. I have behind the Pace modem a very good wireless router which is capable of handling my requirements, however, both the logs in the Pace modem and my router indicate the dropping of the DSL continuously during high bandwidth times.

Some users suggested that the AT&T modem had a power supply issue but removing the wireless and routing functions should have reduced the power requirements substantially.

 

Remember, AT&T is no different than Comcast, Cox, or any other ISP. You can only take what they give you because they don't care about the customer.

 

[Edited to remove an unaithorized AT&T contact number.]

 

FrogFan

Teacher

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41 Messages

Il y a 5 y

The internal buffers of the devices are set in firmware to such a low level that any reasonable load of traffic, both wired and wireless, will cause the modem to drop the DSL connection (Fiber is just DSL over fiber optics) to whatever host it talks to and causes a reconnection. This may take up to 1 - 5 minutes and happens for hours on end.

I think my problem might be different from the problems you've experienced, although I'm no expert.  At any given point in time, I have 3 or 4 devices connected via ethernet plus 2 cell phones, a laptop, a TV and maybe a couple of other devices, connected wirelessly.  I don't use much bandwidth unless I'm streaming TV, and I don't do much of that, either.  Many of my devices connect at 2.4G, and they seem to remain connected indefinitely.  My android phone connects at 5G and seems to remain connected indefinitely as well.  I had my TV connected at 5G for awhile, but it dropped the 5G connection and I connected it at 2.4G.  After my most recent reboot of the Pace, I reconnected the TV at 5G; we'll see how long that lasts.

 

The biggest issue I've had is with the Windows 7 PC.  Normally, when it goes to sleep or hibernates, it will connect at 5G when it awakens.  Eventually, though, say after 2-3 weeks of sleeping, waking, reconnecting, etc., it will fail to connect at 5G and connect at 2.4G instead.  A reboot of the Pace "fixes" the problem temporarily, but it happens again eventually.  I've tried all the standard Windows tricks, updating drivers, etc., and I also bought a new USB wifi adapter.  As I said, all work for awhile and eventually won't reconnect.  At 2.4G, I don't have this problem at all, but there is a lot of traffic in my neighborhood at 2.4G and I'd like to avoid it whenever I can.

 

I'm looking forward to assistance from the AT&T people, but so far nothing helpful.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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29.9K Messages

Il y a 5 y


@jleblancuv wrote:

.... The internal buffers of the devices are set in firmware to such a low level that any reasonable load of traffic, both wired and wireless, will cause the modem to drop the DSL connection...

 

(Fiber is just DSL over fiber optics)...

 


Wrong on these and most of your post.  While the Network Address Translation table is rather limited (compared to some other similar devices), the buffers are not really that low. 

 

An actual fiber (FTTH) installation uses fiber optics and no DSL is involved whatsoever.   The FTTN installations do use either ADSL2+ or VDSL2, but these are not true fiber.

 

[Please keep it courteous.]

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