Let AT&T help you elebrate your dad with Father's Day Gifts that connect us.
Get superfast AT&T Fiber internet
bachastain's profile

New Member

 • 

5 Messages

Thursday, April 27th, 2023 10:28 PM

How see Signal Strength of Extender mesh devices

I'm a new AT&T customer with AT&T Fiber service.  I have a AT&T Arris BGW210-700 Broadband Gateway and a single AT&T AirTies 4971 Wi-Fi Extender to handle the more distant devices.

I'm troubleshooting  some very intermittent network interruptions and so far I don't see a pattern, either in which device or time of day.  I'm currently trying to figure out if I have sufficient signal strength.  Both Gateway to Extender and Extender to Mesh clients.

My question is the Gateway (at 192.168.1.254) doesn't show signal strength for the Extender mesh clients.  I'd like to monitor real time signal strength so I can compare that to the outages.  Is there any way to obtain the current signal strengths of the mesh (connected to the Extender) devices?

Thanks very much.

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

ACE - Expert

 • 

24.7K Messages

1 year ago

Signal bar indicators are calculated in different ways depending on how the mfr wants to calculate it. The best way is to use RSSI but the most common way is to use dBm, which is expressed with a negative number. “0” is the strongest signal, 0 to -100 is the “range”. 0 is perfect and -100 dBm is no signal. So:

Best is -30 to -50

Better is -50 to -67

Good is -67 to -70

Worst is -67 to -100

Most WiFi falls in the -60 to -50 range. If you want to assign a bar to the dBm then 4 is Best, 3 is Better, 2 is Good, and 1 is Worst, but that is just a guesstimate because there is no direct correlation between the two.

ACE - Expert

 • 

35.8K Messages

1 year ago

My best suggestion would be to get an app like "Wi-Fi Analyzer" for your Android phone or inSSIDer or NetSpot for Windows.  To see how good your Extender strength is at the Gateway (for the return path), look for the SSID and the Extender's MAC address while located as close as you can get to your Gateway.  Then you can wander around looking at that same signal to see where the extender is covering.  Then, switch to watching the SSID with the Gateway's MAC address, look at how its signal is at the Extender (for backhaul) and what its coverage is.  Focus mainly on 5 GHz when checking for the communication between the Gateway and the Extender, but don't forget 2.4, especially at longer distances from either device.

NetSpot will draw a heatmap for the SSID showing how they're working together for coverage of your home at large.

I will say that I really encourage you to find a way to run Ethernet from your Gateway to the Extender, technically making the Extender an Access Point and reducing your network congestion and latency.

New Member

 • 

5 Messages

1 year ago

Essentially I'm looking for a signal minimum of 2-3 bars.  How does that translate to dBm?

ACE - Expert

 • 

24.7K Messages

1 year ago

There is no direct correlation between dBm and how a phone “interprets” cellular signal strength. 

New Member

 • 

5 Messages

1 year ago

The program suggested to me above, Wifi Analyzer, reads everything in dBm.  How do I interpret thoses reading to tell if I have a good signal or a bad signal?  Keep in mind I only asked about seeing the bars for mesh devices.

New Member

 • 

5 Messages

1 year ago

Thanks!

New Member

 • 

5 Messages

1 year ago

In case anyone was still wondering, so far it looks like you can't get the signal strength on a mesh device with a browser to 192.168.1.254.  Non mesh devices show the strength but not mesh devices.

I found this accidently but using the Smart Home Manager on your phone (in my case Android) will display that.  Start at the main screen and hit the wifi signal center bottom.  Then select Network Hardware, and then select the Extender, and finally Connected Devices.  All the Extender attached devices are shown with a signal strength symbol on the right.  It's tiny so the information is limited but it's better than nothing for a quick peak at current strengths as rated by the Extender.  If the Extender shows it's happy with the signal, that seems more accurate than trying to interpret the dBm levels.

Thanks again!

(edited)

Not finding what you're looking for?
New to AT&T Community?
New to the AT&T Community? Start by visiting the Community How-To.
New to the AT&T Community?
Visit the Community How-To.